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R974.45 1950-195*/, 

"552 Property of the 
MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Andover, Mass. 

copy 2 




MEMORIAL HALL 
LIBRARY 

Andover, Massachusetts 
475-6960 



TOWN OF 

ANDOVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 




ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

TOWN OFFICERS 



For the Fiscal Year Ending 
DECEMBER 31, 1950 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Accounting Taxes and Assessments 90 

Aid to Dependent Children 73 

Animal Inspector 58 

Appropriations for 1950 52 

Armistice Day 84 

Assessors 57, 116 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 91 

Municipal Properties and Public 

Improvements 117 



General Government 



PAGE 



105 
126 
144 
118 

73 
138 

74 

76, 121 

166 

95 



65, 
73, 

75, 



Balance Sheet 
Board of Appeals 
Board of Health 
Board of Public Welfare 

Aid to Dependent Children 

Infirmary 

Old Age Assistance 

Veterans' Services 
Board of Public Works 

Accounts Receivable 

Administrative and Office 

Assessments and Receipts 

Bridges 

Highways 

Sewers 

Sidewalks 

Snow Removal and Sanding 

Superintendent' 's Report 

Town Engineer 

Trucks, Garage and Repair Shop 

Water Maint. and Construction 85 
Bonds, Redemption of See Town Debt 
Building Inspector 61, 146 



68 



81 

92 

, 71 

67 

66 

69 

72 

167 

175 

68 



Cemetery Funds 
Civilian Defense 



99 

55 



Damages to Persons and Property 83 

Departmental Accounts Receivable 95 

Director of Accounts 47 

Dog Officer 58 

Election and Registration 59 

Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital 65 

Expenditures for 1950 55 



inance Committee 


58 


ire Department 


61, 140 


Forest Fires 


64 



Election and Registration 




59 


Municipal Buildings 




59 


Town Officers 




4 


Highways 




67 


Housing Authority 




123 


Insurance 




84 


Interest 




89 


Jury List 




153 


Maturing Debt 




89 


Memorial Day 




84 


Memorial Hall Library 80, 


104, 


, 157 


Library Statistics 




165 


Report of Librarian 




158 


Trustees 




157 


Milk Inspector 




145 


Moderator 




57 


Moth Suppression 


62, 


151 


Moth Assessments 




92 


Motor Vehicles Excise Tax 




91 


Municipal Buildings 




59 


Municipal Properties and Public 




Improvements 




117 


Old Age Assistance 




74 


Overlay 




97 


Parks and Playgrounds 




81 


Planning Board 


59, 


129 


Police Department 


60, 


141 


Public Dump 




66 


Punchard Athletic Association 




80 


Receipts for 1950 




52 


Recreation Committee 


82, 


135 


Reserve Fund 




89 


Retirement Report 




112 



*School Department 76 

School Lunch 79 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 62, 148 

Selectmen 55 

Sewers 66 

Assessments 92 

Snow Removal and Sanding 72 

*Also see School Report 



Spring Grove Cemetery 
State Election 
Street Lighting 



PAGE 

I, 120 

34 
72 



Tax Collector 56, 114 

Summary of Tax Collector's Cash 

Account 115 

Tax Title Account 90 

Town Accountant 51, 56 

A ccounting Taxes and A ssessments 90 

Appropriations for 1950 52 

Balance Sheet 105 

Board of Public Works Accounts 

Receivable 95 

Departmental Accounts Receivable 95 

Director of Accounts 47 

Expenditures for 1950 55 

John Cornell Fund 98 

Maturing Debt 89 

Overlay 97 

Receipts for 1950 52 

Reserve Fund 89 

Surplus Revenue 97 

Town Debt 111 

* Trustees of Punchard Free School 101 

Water Accounts Receivable 95 



PAGE 

Town Clerk 46, 57 

Town Counsel 58 

Town Debt 111 

Town Infirmary 75, 138 
Town Meetings 

Proceedings 14 

Special 30 

Warrants 9, 186 

Town Officers 4 

Town Reports 85 

Town Scales 85 

Treasurer 56, 113 

Tree Warden 63, 149 

Trust Funds 100 
*Trustees of Punchard Free School 101 



Veterans' Quarters 
Veterans' Services 
Vital Statistics 



83, 84 

76, 121 

46 



Wages and Salaries Survey 131 

Water Accounts Receivable 95 

Water and Sewerage Investigation 137 
Water Maint. and Construction 85 
Wire Inspector 62, 147 

*Also see School Report 



88270 



Town Officers 



ELECTED AND APPOINTED 



Moderator 
Arthur Sweeney 

Board of Selectmen and Public Welfare 
Roy E. Hardy, Chairman Term expires 1951 

J. Everett Collins, Secretary Term expires 1953 

Sidney P. White Term expires 1952 

George H. Winslow, Clerk 
Arthur W. Cole, Agent, Bureau, Old Age Assistance, Welfare 

Board 
Francis P. Markey, Veterans' A fairs Agent 



Board of Assessors 
Roy E. Hardy, Chairman 
J. Everett Collins 
Sidney P. White 



Term expires 1951 
Term expires 1953 
Term expires 1952 



George H. Winslow 



James P. Christie 



Thaxter Eaton 



Town Clerk 



COLLECTOB OF TAXES 



Treasurer 



Town Accountant 
George C. Napier 



Term expires 1951 
Term expires 1952 

Term expires 1953 

Town Counsel 
Walter C. Tomlinson 



Board of Retirement 
George C. Napier, Chairman Term expires 1952 

Term expires 1952 



Edmond E. Hammond 
David L. Nicoll, Secretary 



Term expires 1953 



Board of Public Works 



Sidney P. White, Chairman 

P. Leroy Wilson 

Edward A. Doyle, Secretary 

John H. Kelly 

Alexander H. Henderson 

Warren O. Petersen, Town Engineer 

Edward R. Lawson, Superintendent 

School Committee 
Dorothy T. Partridge 
Anna M. Greeley 
Katharine A. Baldwin 
William A. Doherty, Secretary 
Gordon C. Colquhoun, Chairman 
Kenneth L. Sherman, Superintendent 



Term expires 1953 
Term expires 1951 
Term expires 1951 
Term expires 1952 
Term expires 1952 



Term expires 1953 
Term expires 1953 
Term expires 1952 
Term expires 1952 
Term expires 1951 



School Building Committee 
C. Carleton Kimball, Chairman Kenneth L. Sherman, Secretary 
Herbert P. Carter Harold T. Houston 

Roy E. Hardy Gordon L. Colquhoun 

Stanley F. Swanton 

Attendance Officer School Physician 

John Campbell Philip W. Blake, M.D. 



Athletic Medical Director 
John J. McArdle, Jr., M.D. 



School Nurse 
Ruth E. Westcott, R.N. 



Director, Continuation School 
Carl M. Gahan 



Board of Health 
Percy J. Look, M.D., Chairman 
William V. Emmons 
Charles O. McCullom 
Lotta M. Johnson, R.N., Nurse and Agent 
Robert A. Walsh, Milk Inspector 



Term expires 1952 
Term expires 1953 
Term expires 1951 



Inspector of Slaughtering 

Ray S. Youmans 

5 



Inspector of Buildings Inspector of Plumbing 

Ralph W. Coleman Alexander Thomson 

Planning Board and Board of Survey 
Sidney P. White, Chairman Term expires 1952 

Leon A. Field Term expires 1953 

Walter Tomlinson Term expires 1954 

Frederick E. Cheever Term expires 1955 

Kirk R. Batcheller Term expires 1951 

Inspector of Wires Sealer of Weights and Measures 

William J. Young Joseph Serio 

Wilson Crawford, Deputy 

Inspector of Animals 
Hartwell B. Abbot 

Trustees of Memorial Hall Library 

Winsor Gale, Chairman Term expires 1955 

Arthur W. Reynolds, Treasurer Term expires 1957 

William N. Perry, Secretary Term expires 1954 

Ernest D. Walen Term expires 1951 

Leo F. Daley Term expires 1952 

Alan R. Blackmer Term expires 1953 

Caroline P. Leavitt Term expires 1956 

Trustees of Punchard Free School 
Rev. Frederick B. Noss, President 
Rev. John S. Moses 
Rev. John G. Gaskill 

Edmond E. Hammond, Clerk and Treasurer Term expires 1952 

Fred W. Doyle Term expires 1952 

Roy E. Hardy Term expires 1952 

Harry Sellars Term expires 1952 

C. Carleton Kimball Term expires 1952 

Trustees of Cornell Fund 

Edward P. Hall Term expires 1953 

Arthur W. Cole Term expires 1951 

Frederick E. Cheever, Treasurer Term expires 1952 

6 



Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery 



Term expires 1951 
Term expires 1953 
Term expires 1951 
Term expires 1952 
Term expires 1952 



Frank R. Petty, Chairman 
Malcolm E. Lundgren 
Albert E. Curtis 
Clifford E. Marshall 
Frederick E. Cheever 
Jesse E. West, Superintendent 

Board of Registrars 
Ralph A. Bailey, Chairman 
Walter F. McDonald 
Eugene A. Zalla 
George H. Winslow, Clerk 

Finance Committee 
Howell M. Stillman, Chairman 
Stanley F. Swanton, Secretary 
Victor Mill, Jr. 
Fred W. Doyle 

Recreation Committee 
Stafford A. Lindsay, Chairman Alan F. Dunlop 

George A. Stanley, Jr. Francis L. Caverly 

Alco E. Taylor 

Superintendent of Moth Department 



Term expires 1951 
Term expires 1953 
Term expires 1952 



George E. Abbot 
Harold G. Bowen 
Louis E. Gleason 



George R. Abbott 

Tree Warden 
George R. Abbott 

Board of Appeals 
James S. Eastham, Chairman 
Roy E. Hardy, Secretary 
Edward P. Hall 

Walter C. Tomlinson, Associate Member 
Leon A. Field, Associate Member 



Appointed Annually 

Term expires 1953 

Term expires 1952 
Term expires 1953 
Term expires 1951 



Andover Housing Authority 
Douglas Crocket, Chairman Term expires 1951 

Stanley Swanton, State Member, Vice Chairman 

Term expires 1952 
Winthrop Newcomb, Treasurer Term expires 1953 

Ernest Hall, Assistant Treasurer Term expires 1954 

Charles Hatch, Secretary Term expires 1955 

7 



Fire Department 

Charles E. Buchan, Chief 

Charles E. Buchan, Forest Warden 

Police Department 

George A. Dane, Chief 

George A. Dane, Dog Officer 

Constables 

George A. Dane Term expires 1951 

George N. Sparks Term expires 1951 

J. Lewis Smith Term expires 1951 

TOWN OF ANDOVER 

Population, 1945 Census— 11920 

Registered Voters 1950—7277 

POLITICAL SUBDIVISIONS INCLUDING ANDOVER 

Senators 
Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., Beverly Leverett Saltonstall, Dover 

Fifth Congressional District 
Edith Nourse Rogers, 444 Andover St., Lowell 

Fifth Councillor District 
Cornelius J. Twomey, 176 Phillips St., Lawrence 

Fourth Essex Senatorial District 
John W. Coddaire, Jr., 33 Westland Terr., Haverhill 

Fourth Essex Representative District 
J. Everett Collins, 35 Summer St., Andover 

Frank S. Giles, 373 Lowell St., Methuen 

William Longworth, 27 Stevens St., Methuen 

Essex County Commissioners 
Arthur A. Thompson, Methuen 

C. F. Nelson Pratt, Saugus 

J. Fred Manning, Lynn 

8 



Annual Town Meeting 

MARCH 6, 1950 



Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, February 
6th, 1950, the Inhabitants of the Town of Andover, qualified to 
vote in Elections and Town Affairs, met and assembled at the 
designated polling places in Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, 
Five and Six, viz: The Central Fire Station in Precinct One; the 
Square and Compass Hall in Precinct Two; the Sacred Heart 
School, Balmoral Street, Shawsheen Village, in Precinct Three; 
the Andover Grange Hall in Precinct Four; the Fire Station, Bal- 
lardvale, in Precinct Five, and the Peabody House, Phillips 
Street, in Precinct Six, in said Andover on Monday, the sixth day 
of March, 1950, at 7:00 o'clock A.M. to act upon the following 
articles : 

Essex, ss. Andover, March 6, 1950 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of 
the Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the in- 
habitants of said town, to meet at the time and places and for the 
purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same, on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse and 
in no less than five other public places where bills and notices are 
usually posted and by publication in the Andover Townsman. 
Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

George N. Sparks, Constable 

Article 1 . Election of Officers 

Took up Article 1 and proceeded to vote for Town Officers. 
The Ballot boxes were found to be empty and registered 0000. 
The Polls were opened at seven o'clock A.M. and closed at seven 
o'clock P.M. The total number of ballots cast was 3344 — viz: 
Precinct 1—921, Precinct 2—675, Precinct 3—493, Precinct 4— 
347, Precinct 5—259, Precinct 6—649. 





Moderator — for One Year 






Precincts 




1 


2 3 4 5 6 




769 


515 416 298 219 590 Arthur Sweeney 


2807 


152 


160 77 49 40 59 Blanks 


537 



Town Treasurer — for Three Years 
Precincts 
1 2 3 4 5 6 

804 553 419 297 230 599 Thaxter Eaton 2902 

117 122 74 50 29 50 Blanks 442 

Selectman— for Three Years 
770 501 413 274 218 571 J. Everett Collins 2747 

151 174 80 73 41 78 Blanks 597 

Assessor — for Three Years 
756 482 406 274 209 564 J. Everett Collins 2691 

165 193 87 73 50 85 Blanks 653 

Board of Public Works — for Three Years 

132 158 103 16 33 58 James V. Irvine 500 

211 137 111 63 55 138 Walter E. Mondale 715 

538 336 256 254 160 430 Sidney P. White 1974 

40 44 23 14 11 23 Blanks 155 

Board of Health — for Three Years 
782 513 417 296 213 591 William V. Emmons 2812 

139 162 76 51 46 58 Blanks 532 

Trustee of Memorial Hall Library — for Seven Years 
758 468 399 286 206 557 Arthur W. Reynolds 2674 
163 207 94 61 53 92 Blanks 670 

Tree Warden — for Three Years 



694 


423 


371 


275 


192 


430 


George R. Abbott 


2386 


188 


188 


86 


59 


50 


208 


Thomas D. Blunt 


779 


38 


64 


36 


13 


17 


11 


Blanks 


179 




i 


School Committee — Two for Three Years 




499 


472 


296 


183 


161 


357 


Anna M. Greeley 


1968 


545 


297 


272 


193 


131 


453 


Dorothy T. Partridge 


1891 


68 


71 


77 


57 


29 


57 


Ernest Picard 


359 


447 


236 


211 


174 


109 


277 


Vincent F. Stulgis 


1454 


283 


274 


130 


87 


88 


154 
10 


Blanks 


1016 



School Committee — One for Two Years 





Precincts 






1 


2 3 


4 


5 


6 


303 


225 210 


146 


125 


300 


85 


76 47 


37 


21 


69 


426 


231 188 


125 


70 


226 


107 


143 48 


39 


43 


54 



Katharine A. Baldwin 1309 

Persis D. Crawford 335 

William P. Hamblet 1266 

Blanks 434 



Planning Board — for Five Years 

768 493 409 287 222 576 Frederick E. Cheever 2755 

153 182 84 60 37 73 Blanks 589 

Andover Housing Authority— for Five Years 

593 360 336 235 172 428 Charles G. Hatch 2124 

196 174 101 62 43 146 William G. Quigley 722 

132 141 56 50 44 75 Blanks 498 

Constables — Three for One Year 

767 478 402 280 202 555 George A. Dane 2684 

391 311 184 135 82 230 Chester J. S. Harnden 1333 

550 301 304 215 134 433 J. Lewis Smith 1937 

632 430 334 254 228 471 George N. Sparks 2349 

423 505 255 157 131 258 Blanks 1729 

All the foregoing officers were voted for on one ballot and the 
check lists were used. 



REPORT OF CLERK— PRECINCT 1 

Andover, March 6, 1950 
Polls opened at 7 A.M. Warden in charge, Rowland W. Luce. 
Fallot box registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 
7 P.M. Ballot box registered when polls closed 921. Number of 
ballots received 1644. Number of ballots returned 724. Number 
of ballots cast 921. Police officer on duty, William Tammany. 
Voted to count ballots at 8:00 A.M. 

Joseph W. McNally, Clerk 

it 



REPORT OF CLERK— PRECINCT 2 

Andover, March 6, 1950 
Polls opened at 7 A.M. Warden in charge, Mark Keane. Ballot 
box registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 7 P.M. 
Ballot box registered when polls closed 675. Number of ballots 
received 1568. Number of ballots returned 893. Number of ballots 
cast 675. Police officer on duty, David NicolL Voted to count 
ballots at 9:00 A.M. 

Norman K. MacLeish, Clerk 

REPORT OF CLERK— PRECINCT 3 

Andover, March 6, 1950 
Polls opened at 7 A.M. Warden in charge, Stafford A. Lindsay. 
Ballot box registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 
7 P.M. Ballot box registered when polls closed 493. Number of 
ballots received 1520. Number of ballots returned 1027. Number 
of ballots cast 493. Police officer on duty, Frank Koza. Voted to 
count ballots at 7:25 A.M. 

Garrett J. Burke, Clerk 

REPORT OF CLERK— PRECINCT FOUR 

Andover, March 6, 1950 
Polls opened at 7 A.M. Warden in charge, Francis E. Wilson. 
Ballot box registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 
7 P.M. Ballot box registered when polls closed 347. Number of 
ballots received 771. Number of ballots returned 424. Number 
of ballots cast 347. Police officer on duty, Richard Caldwell. 
Voted to count ballots at 11:00 A.M. 

Frederick J. Kearn, Clerk 

REPORT OF CLERK— PRECINCT FIVE 

March 6, 1950 
Polls opened at 7 A.M. Warden in charge, William Miller, Jr. 
Ballot box registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 
7:00 P.M. Ballot box registered when polls closed 259. Number of 
ballots received 632. Number of ballots returned 373. Number of 
ballots cast 259. Police officer on duty, George N. Sparks. Voted 
to count ballots at 1 :50 P.M. 

Eugene A. Zalla, Clerk 

12 



REPORT OF CLERK— PRECINCT SIX 

Andover, March 6, 1950 
Polls opened at 7 A.M. Warden in charge, Ralph A. Bailey. 
Ballot box registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 
7:00 P.M. Ballot box registered when polls closed 649. Number 
of ballots received 1160. Number of ballots returned 514. Number 
of ballots cast 649. Police officer on duty, Roy Russell. Voted to 
count ballots at 9 A.M. 

John M. Lynch, Clerk 



After final action of Article One, the said meeting was adjourned 
by virtue of Section 20, Chapter 39 of the General Laws to Mon- 
day, March 13th, at 7 o'clock P.M. at the Memorial Auditorium. 



13 



Adjourned Town Meeting 

MARCH 13, 1950 



The check lists were used for admittance and showed 825 
voters present. The meeting was called to order, at 7 :00 o'clock 
P.M. by Arthur Sweeney, Moderator. 

Prayer was offered by Rev. Henry B. Smith. 

Salute to the flag led by J. Everett Collins. 

Unanimous consent of the meeting was voted to admit: Mrs. 
William T. Rich III, Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. MacMackin, 
Warren Petersen, Martha Ann Fieldhouse, Mrs. Donald Thomp- 
son, Mrs. and Miss Coffin, Norman and Gladys M. Barraclough, 
Everett L. and Elizabeth B. Hull, Dino Olivetti, Douglas N. 
Howe, Frank E. Whiting, Donald Van Roosen, Louise Coffin, 
Patricia Walber, Mrs. William Dreyer, Mrs. Mary Deacon, 
Norman Cormeau, Judy Nowell, Alan Hughes, Marilyn Dixon, 
Sidney Tavern. 

The warrant and return of service by the constable was read 
by the Town Clerk. 

Article 1 — To elect a Moderator for one year, Treasurer for 
three years, Selectman for three years, Assessor for three years, a 
member of the Board of Public Works for three years, a member 
of the Board of Health for three years, Trustee of Memorial Hall 
Library for seven years, Tree Warden for three years, two mem- 
bers of the School Committee for three years, one member of the 
School Committee for two years, a member of the Planning 
Board for five years, a member of the Andover Housing Author- 
ity for five years, three Constables for one year, and all town 
officers required by law to be elected by ballot. 

All the above candidates to be voted for on one ballot. The 
polls will be open from 7:00 o'clock A.M. to 7:00 o'clock P.M. 

The Town Clerk announced the results of balloting March 6th 
and declared Arthur Sweeney elected as Moderator for the en- 
suing year and he had previously been sworn to faithfully perform 
the duties of that office. 

The moderator declared the following elected: 

Thaxter Eaton, Treasurer for three years. 

14 



J. Everett Collins, Selectman for three years. 
J. Everett Collins, Assessor for three years. 
Sidney P. White, Board of Public Works for three years. 
William V. Emmons, Board of Health for three years. 
Arthur W. Reynolds, Trustee of Memorial Hall Library for 
seven years. 

George R. Abbott, Tree Warden for three years. 
Anna M. Greeley, School Committee for three years. 
Dorothy T. Partridge, School Committee for three years. 
Katharine A. Baldwin, School Committee for two years. 
Charles G. Hatch, Andover Housing Authority for five years. 
George A. Dane, Constable for one year. 
J. Lewis Smith, Constable for one year. 
George N. Sparks, Constable for one year. 

Article 2 — To elect all other officers not required by law to be 
elected by ballot. 

Upon motion of Mr. Hardy and duly seconded, it was VOTED, 
that Edward P. Hall be elected Trustee of Cornell Fund for three 
years. 

Article 3 — To establish the salaries of elected Town Officers for 
the ensuing year. 

It was VOTED to establish the salaries of the elected Town 
Officers for the ensuing year as follows (each item being voted on 
separately) : 
Chairman, Board of Selectmen per annum $ 400.00 

Two members at $300. each per annum 600 . 00 

Board of Assessors 

Three members at $400. each per annum 1200. 00 

Board of Public Welfare 

Three members at $100. each, per annum 300.00 

Town Clerk 3434.50 

Collector of Taxes 341 5 . 00 

Town Treasurer 3340.00 

Moth Superintendent and Tree Warden 

combined salary for both per week beginning 

April 1st 62.00 

Board of Health 

Three members at $100. each per annum 300.00 

15 



Secretary of the Board of Public Works 
Treasurer, Library Trustees 
Moderator, per meeting 



100.00 

100.00 

10.00 



Article 4 — To determine what sums of money shall be appro- 
priated for the following purposes : 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to raise 
and appropriate the following sums of money, each item being 
voted on separately: 

American Legion $ 600 . 00 

Veterans of Foreign Wars 600 . 00 

Disabled Veterans 480 . 00 

Armistice Day 150.00 

Memorial Day 1250.00 

Aid to Dependent Children 13200.00 

Veterans Services 13000.00 

Old Age Assistance 72500 . 00 

Public Welfare 18000.00 

Retirement Fund 21653 . 00 

Damages to Persons and Property 500.00 

Elections and Registrations 5185.00 

Insurance 18000.00 

Essex T. B. Hospital 16942 . 40 

Recreation 9600.00 

Public Dump 1500.00 

Printing Town Report 1288 . 50 

Selectmen 2655.00 

Treasurer 4516.00 

Collector of Taxes 7 1 34 . 00 

Accountant 4627.00 

Assessors 8305 . 00 

Town Clerk 5606.00 

Moderator 30.00 

Town Counsel 750.00 

Finance Committee 20.00 

Planning Board and Survey 200 . 00 

Dog Officer 225.00 

Animal Inspector 350.00 

Building Inspector 1 100 . 00 

Town Scales 200.00 



16 



Inspector of Wires 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Municipal Buildings 

Infirmary 

Moth Suppression 

Police Department (inc. $2000. of Parking Meter 

receipts) 
Fire Department 
Brush Fires 
Interest 

Retirement of Bonds 
Tree Warden 
Board of Health 
Care of T. B. Patients 

Trustees of Memorial Library (plus dog tax) 
Spring Grove Cemetery 
School Committee 
Highway Maintenance 
Water Maintenance 
Parks 

Sewer Maintenance 
Snow Removal and Sanding (incl. $2000. for equip. 

and plowing private ways as approved) 
Trucks, Garage and Repair Shop 
Street Lighting 
Administrative and Office 

Total Departmental 

Special Articles 

Article 5 — Two new automobiles, Police Dept. 
Article 6 — Oil burner unit and boiler including fuel 

tanks, Fire Department 
Article 7 — Two-way radio, Forest Fire Department 
Article 8 — Chapter 90 Highway Maintenance 
Article 9 — Improvement of Main Street 

($12000.00 trans, from surplus revenue and to be returned) 
Article 11 — Repair and build sidewalks 7500 . 00 

Article 12 — Tractor with attachments 2500 . 00 



$ 925. 


00 


600. 


00 


6868. 


00 


11100 


00 


7958, 


00 


64688 


.00 


75838 


.00 


1800 


.00 


2646 


.25 


39000 


.00 


11476.00 


5500 


.00 


4000 


.00 


28334 


.78 


16500 


.00 


335273 


.00 


56300 


.00 


49450 


.00 


6200 


.00 


6350 


.00 


15500 


.00 


10450. 


00 


23250. 


00 


16750. 


00 


$1,026,923.93 


$2266.00 
I 


i 

1300. 


00 


t 500. 


00 


3000. 


00 


4000. 


00 



17 



$ 450.00 



250 


00 


2500. 


00 


34500 


00 


20000 


00 


4000. 


00 


1700. 


00 


980. 


00 



1585.00 



Article 14— Land acquisition and construction 

Chandler Road 
Article 15 — Land acquisition and construction 

North Street 
Article 16 — Widening Stevens Street 
Article 18 — Water Department improvement' 
Article 21 — Extending and improving water system 
Article 22 — Control Dutch Elm Disease 
Article 23 — New Truck, Moth and Tree Department 

(plus turn-in of 1934 truck) 
Article 24 — Vocational Education 
Article 25 — Members of Teachers Retirement — 

military leave of absence 
Article 26 — Preliminary plans, elementary school 

buildings 
Article 27 — Eugene V. Lovely retirement 
Article 28 — Converting boiler to oil — 

Memorial Hall Library 
Article 30 — Improve and Resurface B.V. playground 
Article 42 — Printing the Town By-Laws 
Article 1 — Supplementary Warrant 

Engine-driven centrifugal pump 

Total Special Articles 

Total Budget and Special Articles 

Article 5 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $2266.00 for the purchase of two new automobiles for 
the Police Department, and use the trade-in value of the 1947 
Plymouth Sedan and the 1948 Pontiac Sedan as part of the 
purchase price. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 5 
as read. 

Article 6— To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
$1300.00 to meet the expense of purchase and installation of an 
oil burner including fuel tanks, at the Central Fire Station. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to raise and appro- 
priate $1300.00 to meet the expense of purchase and installation 
of an oil burner unit and boiler, including fuel tanks, at the 
Central Fire Station. 



10000 


.00 


2375 


.00 


775 


.00 


2350 


.00 


350 


.00 


15000 


.00 


$117881. 


.00 


$1144804.93 



18 



Article 7 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
$500.00 to meet the expense of purchase of a two-way radio 
mobile unit for the Forest Fire Department. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 7 
as read. 

Article 8 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
or transfer from unappropriated available funds in the treasury, 
a sum of money for Chapter 90, Highway Maintenance, or take 
any action in relation thereto. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to raise and appro- 
priate $3000.00 for Chapter 90, Highway Maintenance. 

Article 9 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of $4000.00 for the improvement of Main Street; said 
money to be used in conjunction with any money which may be 
allotted by the State or County, or both, for this purpose. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of 
$4000.00 be raised and appropriated to meet the town's share of 
the cost of Chapter 90, Highway Construction, and in addition, 
the sum of $12,000.00 to be transferred from surplus revenue to 
meet the State and County's share of the cost of the work, the 
reimbursements from the State and County to be restored, upon 
their receipt, to surplus revenue. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to take up Article 
10, and Article 20 together. 

Article 10 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of $2500.00 for the improvement of Lowell Street in the 
vicinity of Argilla Road; said money to be used in conjunction 
with any money which may be allotted by the State or County, 
or both, for this purpose. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to refer Article 1 
to Annual Town Meeting, 1951. 

Article 11 — To see if the town will authorize the Board of Pub- 
lie Works to repair and build sidewalks and raise and appropriate 
the sum of $7500.00 therefor. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to raise and appro- 
priate $7500.00 under Article 11. 

19 



Article 12 — To see if the town will authorize the Board of Pub- 
lic Works to purchase a tractor with attachment for loading 
back-filling, plowing, etc., and raise and appropriate the sum of 
$2500.00 therefor. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to raise and appro- 
priate $2500.00 under Article 12. 

Article 13 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the amount of $14000.00 for the purpose of enclosing Roger's 
Brook in a buried culvert between the west line of Whittier 
Street and the south line of Chestnut Street together with such 
regrading as may be necessary therefor. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to postpone action 
on Article 13 until Annual Town Meeting of 1951, before which 
time the Board of Public Works is requested to make a survey 
and study of conditions and report at said meeting. 

Article 14 — To see if the town will vote to purchase or seize 
by eminent domain a parcel of land necessary to reduce the 
curvature and widen the present roadway on the easterly side of 
Chandler Road abutting land of Octave Jr. and Florence A. 
Bourdelais for a distance of 245 feet more or less, as shown on a 
plan on file at the office of the Town Clerk, and grade and re- 
surface said section of roadway as widened, and raise and appro- 
priate the amount of $450.00 for said land acquisition and con- 
struction work. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED unanimously to 
accept Article 14 as read. 

Article 15 — To see if the town will vote to purchase or seize by 
eminent domain a parcel of land necessary to reduce the curva- 
ture and widen the present roadway on the westerly side of North 
Street abutting land of Agnes V. Bateman for a distance of 144 
feet more or less, as shown on a plan on file at the office of the 
Town Clerk, and grade and resurface said section of roadway as 
widened, and raise and appropriate the amount of $250.00 for 
said land acquisition and construction work. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED unanimously to 
accept Article 15 as read. 

Article 16 — To see if the town w T ill vote to raise and appropriate 
the amount of $2500.00 for the purpose of relocating the existing 

20 



curb stones on the west side of Stevens Street and widen the 
traveled way to 26 feet for a distance of about 700 feet in the 
vicinity of house numbers 29 to 75. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 16 
as read. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to take up Article 
18 and then to take up Article 17. 

Article 17 — To see if the town will vote to purchase by negoti- 
ated sale or seize by right of eminent domain, a parcel of land off 
Bancroft Road to be used in conjunction with the construction 
of a water distribution reservoir; said parcel of land being owned 
now or formerly by George J. Flathers and Melrena Flathers and 
containing about 3.49 acres; as shown on a plan on file in the 
Town Clerk's Office entitled "Plan of Land on Bancroft Road to 
be acquired for a New Distribution Reservoir drawn by Warren 
O. Petersen, Town Engineer, dated February 8, 1950" and raise 
and appropriate the sum of $4000.00 therefor. 

Article defeated. 

Article 18 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the amount of $114,500.00 for the purpose of improving and 
enlarging certain facilities of the water system; the work con- 
templated under this article consists of the following major sub- 
divisions which are enumerated in the order of their urgency and 
desirability for the improvement of the system as a whole; first 
the construction of a new Low-Service Distribution Reservoir of 
six million gallon capacity with necessary piping, secondly a new 
dual-driven pump, controls, measuring devices and necessary 
piping rearrangements all at the High-Service Pumping Station; 
lastly, the cleaning and relining of the present force main from the 
High-Service Pumping Station to the High-Service Reservoir and 
cleaning and relining small portions of the High Service mains: 
work to proceed only with the approval of the Board of Select- 
men, the Finance Committee and the Board of Public Works. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to raise and appro- 
priate the amount of $34,500.00 for the purpose of improving and 
enlarging certain facilities of the water system. The work con- 
templated under this article consists of the following: First, new 
pumping equipment, controls, measuring devices and necessary 
piping re-arrangements all at the High-Service Pumping Station; 

21 



secondly, the cleaning and relining of the present force main from 
the High-Service Pumping Station to the High-Service Reservoir, 
and cleaning and relining small portions of the High-Service 
mains; work to proceed only with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, the Finance Committee and the Board of Public 
Works. 

Article 19 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $12,000.00 for the purpose of purchasing and installing 
a high-pressure horizontal tubular steam boiler to replace an 
existing boiler which has been condemned at Haggetts Pond 
Pumping Station. 

Article withdrawn. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED at this time to take 
up Article One, Supplementary Warrant. See Supplementary 
W 7 arrant following Article 50, Regular Town Meeting Warrant. 

Article 20 — To see if the town will vote to purchase a parcel of 
land necessary for the relocation of a portion of Argilla Road at 
Lowell Street abutting land of Arthur Peatman, said parcel con- 
taining about 23,000 square feet or 0.53 acres, as shown on a 
plan on file at the office of the Town Clerk; and grade and pave 
said relocated portion of Argilla Road ; and raise and appropriate 
the amount of $4,700.00 for said land acquisition and roadway 
construction work. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to refer Article 20 
to Annual Town Meeting of 1951. 

Article 21 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $20,000.00 for the purpose of extending and improving 
the water system of the Town of Andover, all work to be done 
under the supervision of the Board of Public Works and no work 
to be started until approved by the Board of Selectmen, the 
Finance Committee and the Board of Public Works. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to consider with 
Article 21, Articles 31-34 inclusive. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $20,000.00 for the purpose of extending and im- 
proving the water system of the Town of Andover, all work to be 
done under the supervision of the Board of Public Works and no 

22 



work to be started until approved by the Board of Selectmen, the 
Finance Committee and the Board of Public Works. 

Article 22 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $4,000.00 for control of the Dutch Elm Disease as re- 
quired by Chapter 761 of the General Laws of Massachusetts, 
Acts of 1949. Up to $200.00 of the above sum to be available to 
the Moth Superintendent in seeking information outside the 
Commonwealth. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 

22 as read. 

Article 23 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $1700.00, plus the turn-in value of an old 1934 truck 
to purchase a new truck for use in the Tree and Moth Depart- 
ments. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 

23 as read. 

Article 24 — To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
School Committee to continue to maintain State-aided vocational 
education in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 74, Gen- 
eral Laws, and Acts amendatory thereto, or dependent thereon, 
and further raise and appropriate the sum of $980.00 therefor. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 

24 as read. 

Article 25 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
$1585.00 to be paid to the Commonwealth for assessments for 
members of the Teachers' Retirement Association on military 
leave of absence'. This is to be paid under Section 9 of Chapter 708 
of the Acts of 1941 and Section 9A of said 708, as inserted by 
Chapter 419 of the Acts of 1943. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 

25 as read. 

Article 26 — To see if the town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of $10,000.00 for preliminary plans for a new 12 basic room 
elementary school building plus other facilities at the Central 
Plant and for a new six basic room elementary school building 
plus other facilities in the West Center District, and authorize the 
Moderator to appoint a school building committee. 

23 



Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $10,000. for preliminary plans for a new ele- 
mentary school building, plus other facilities, at the Central 
Plant, and for a new elementary school building, plus other facili- 
ties, in the West Center District, and authorize the Moderator to 
appoint a school building committee. 

Article 27 — To see what action the town will take relative to a 
pension for retirement of Eugene V. Lovely at one-half the annual 
salary as Principal of Punchard High School. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Chapter 
212 Acts 1950 of the Legislature, recently passed, to establish 
pension for retirement for Eugene V. Lovely at $2375.00 per 
annum and raise and appropriate that amount. 

Article 28 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $775.00 for the purpose of converting the present 
boiler in the Memorial Hall Library to oil. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 
28 as read. 

Article 29 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $2175.00 for the purpose of improving the lighting in 
the Memorial Hall Library through the installation of modern 
electric light fixtures. 

Article defeated. Yes 62. No 182. 

Article 30 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $2500.00 to resurface and improve a portion of the 
Ballardvale Playground on Andover Street, for year round recre- 
ational purposes, this money to be expended under the super- 
vision of the Board of Public Works and the Committee on Recre- 
ation. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to raise and appro- 
priate $2350.00 under Article 30. 

Article 31 — To see if the town will authorize the Board of Pub- 
lic Works to extend the ten-inch water main on Bailey Road a 
distance of approximately 800 feet and raise and appropriate the 
sum of $7,500.00 therefor, on petition of George W. Brouillard 
and others. 

Article 31 referred to under Article 21. 

24 



Article 32 — To see if the town will authorize the Board of Pub- 
lic Works to extend the water main from the present dead end on 
Flint Circle along Flint Circle a distance of 400 feet and appro- 
priate the sum of $1600.00 therefor, on petition of Edward P. 
Hall and others. 

Article 32 referred to under Article 21. 

Article 33 — To see if the town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to install a water main in Lovejoy Road extending 
a distance of twelve hundred (1200) feet from Dascomb Road to 
property owned by Robert F. MacMackin and raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $5000.00 therefor, on petition of Robert F. 
MacMackin and others. 

Article 33 referred to under Article 21. 

Article 34 — To see if the town will authorize the Board of Pub- 
lic Works to extend the water line on Salem Street a distance of 
3,550 feet from the property owned by Fred A. Gould to a point 
opposite the Conway property at the corner of Jenkins Road and 
Salem Street and raise and appropriate the sum of $18,000.00 
therefor, on petition of John J. Conway and others. 

Article 34 referred to under Article 21. 

Article 35 — To see if the town will vote to accept as a public 
way, Beech Circle, so called, for a distance of 400 feet northerly 
from the northerly line of Shawsheen Road, as approved by the 
Planning Board and as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as 
shown on a plan with descriptions dated July, 1946, made by Clin- 
ton F. Goodwin, Engineer, Haverhill, on file at the Town Clerk's 
Office, on petition of George F. Dufton and others. 

Article 35 withdrawn. 

Article 36 — To see if the town will vote to accept as a public 
way and name Cornell Road, as approved by the Board of Survey 
and laid out by the Board of Selectmen, as shown on a plan en- 
titled, Acceptance Plan for Cornell Road, Andover, Mass., made 
January, 1949, by Ralph B. Brasseur, Civil Engineer, Haverhill, 
Mass. Both plan and description referred to being on file at the 
Town Clerk's Office, on petition of Edward F. Murach, and 
others. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article- 36 
as read. 

25 



Article 37 — To see if the town will vote to accept as a public 
way and name "Elm Court" as approved by the Board of Survey 
and as laid out by the Board of Selectmen, on a revised plan 
entitled "Acceptance Plan for Elm Court, Andover, Mass." 
made March, 1949, by Clinton F. Goodwin, Engineer, Haverhill, 
Mass., said plan on file in the office of the Town Clerk, on peti- 
tion of Mary C. Connor and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 
37 as read. 

Article 38 — To see if the town will vote to accept as a public 
way Marwood Drive from Lowell Street southerly to a turning 
circle as laid out 40' in width as shown on a plan of said way made 
August, 1948, by Clinton F. Goodwin, Engineer, and on file at the 
office of the Town Clerk, on petition of Claude P. Woodworth and 
others. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 38 
as read. 

Article 39 — To see if the town will vote to accept as a public 
way and name West Wind Road, as approved by the Board of 
Survey, as laid out by the Board of Selectmen, as shown on a 
plan entitled "Acceptance Plan for W 7 est Wind Road, Andover, 
Mass. made October, 18, 1948, by Warren M. Mirrick, C.E., of 
Stoneham, Mass.", on file in the Town Clerk's office, on petition 
of Lilla A. Burton and others. 

Article withdrawn. 

Article 40 — To see if the town will vote to rescind the vote 
passed on Article 6 of the warrant of Annual Town Meeting, 
March 11, 1946, relative to the sum of $35,000 voted for sewer 
system. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to rescind the vote 
passed on Article 6 of the warrant of Annual Town Meeting, 
March 11, 1946. 

Article 41 — To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-Law T by designating as a Business District the area on the 
northerly side of Essex Street between Railroad Avenue on the 
east, the Shawsheen River on the w r est and bounded on the north 
by the Industrial District two hundred (200) feet north of Essex 
Street, on petition of Edward O'Hagan and others. 

26 



Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED unanimously to 
amend the Zoning By-Law by designating as a Business District 
the area on the northerly side of Essex Street between Railroad 
Avenue on the east, the Shawsheen River on the west and bound- 
ed on the north by the Industrial District two hundred (200) 
feet north of Essex Street. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to take up Article 

44 before Article 42. 

Article 42 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
$350.00 for printing Town By-Laws. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 
42 as read. 

Article 43 — To see if the town will vote to accept sections 132 
to 136 of Chapter 140, General Laws relative to smoke nuisance 
prevention. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept sections 
132 to 136 of Chapter 140, General Laws relative to smoke 
nuisance prevention. 

Article 44 — To see if the town will vote to accept the recom- 
mendations of special committee for revision of building laws, 
and adopt these recommendations as the Building Code for the 
Town of Andover when approved by the Attorney General. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept the re- 
port of the Committee to Revise the Town Building Laws as 
printed in the Annual Town Report for 1949, Pages 138 through 
157. 

Article 45 — To see if the town will vote to accept from M. T. 
Stevens & Sons Co., a parcel of land on the easterly side of 
Stevens Street as described on a plan on file in the office of the 
Town Clerk and entitled "Land of M. T. Stevens & Sons Co. in 
Andover, Mass., to be acquired for Stevens Street Widening," 
dated April, 1949, and prepared by C. T. Gilliard, Town Engineer. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 

45 as read. 

Article 46 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $550.00 for the purpose of constructing a press booth 

27 



on the permanent bleachers at the Central Playstead, on petition 
of Andover Boosters Committee. 

Article 47 — To see if the town will vote to accept the sum of 
$4,399.00 received in 1949 for the perpetual care of lots in Spring 
Grove Cemetery, and $500.00 for lots in the South Church Ceme- 
tery on petition of Thaxter Eaton, Treasurer. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 
47 as read. 

Article 48 — To determine what disposition shall be made of un- 
expended appropriations and free cash in the treasury. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED that all unexpend- 
ed appropriations be turned into the treasury except the follow- 
ing: 

Article 8 (1946)— History of Andover $2000 . 00 

Article 22 (1945)— Shaw Property Plans 2500.00 

Article 4 (Dec. 1948)— Sewer— Morton St. 400.00 

Article 19 (1945) — Water and Sewer Special Com. Study 716.50 
Article 44— Sewer Chestnut Street 600 . 00 

Board of Public Works Machinery Account 2088 . 76 

Article 7 (Dec. 1948)— Central St. Bridge 70.68 

Article 19— Andover Street Bridge 6103 . 04 

Article 38 (1948)— Widening Dascomb Road 19.80 

Article 54— Land and Wall, Dascomb Road 1500.00 

Article 30 (1948)— Shawsheen School Yard * 758 . 07 

Article 1 (May 1948)— Housing Authority 395.47 

Article 5 — Extending Water System 1283.05 

Article 24 — Pumping Equipment — Bancroft Road 6080. 13 

Article 33— Water— Red Spring Road 1200 . 00 

That $15000.00 of the Overlay Reserve be transferred to the 
Reserve Fund, and that $65000.00 free cash be voted to the 
Assessors to reduce the 1950 tax rate, and to offset appropriations 
for capital outlays voted in preceding articles. 

Article 49 — To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 
Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept report of 
town officers and place on file. 

Article 50 — To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to adjourn at 
11:18 P.M. 

28 



SUPPLEMENTARY WARRANT 

At 8:30 P.M. after motion duly seconded it was VOTED to 
take up Article One, Supplementary Warrant, with Article 19, 
Regular Town Meeting Warrant. 

Article 1 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money for the purpose of purchasing and installing a 
new engine-driven centrifugal pump together with necessary 
diesel engine, foundations, piping, and other appurtenances, for 
use at Haggetts Pond Pumping Station, on petition of the Board 
of Public Works. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of fifteen thousand ($15,000.00) dollars for the 
purpose of purchasing and installing an electric-driven centrifugal 
pump together with the necessary electric motor, foundations, 
piping, and other appurtenances including provisions for connec- 
tion to a gasoline or diesel power unit to be used as a future 
auxiliary; for use at Haggetts Pond Pumping Station. 

APPOINTMENTS BY THE MODERATOR 

Finance Committee 
Howell M. Stillman Stanley F. Swanton George E. Abbot 
Victor J. Mill, Jr. Harold G. Bowen Louis E. Gleason 

Frederick W. Doyle 

School Building Committee 

Roy E. Hardy Stanley F. Swanton Gordon L. Colquhoun 

Kenneth L. Sherman Harold T. Houston C. Carleton Kimball 

Herbert P. Carter 

i 

Sewer and Water Advisory Committee 

Sidney P. White Joseph A. McCarthy William R. Edwards 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

Attest: 
George H. Winslow, Town Clerk 



29 



Special Town Meeting 

NOVEMBER 13, 1950 



Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, October 13, 
1950, the Inhabitants of the Town of Andover, qualified to vote in 
Town Affairs met and assembled in the Memorial Auditorium on 
Bartlet Street on Monday, the Thirteenth Day of November, 
1950, at 7:30 o'clock P.M. 

The meeting was called to order by Moderator Arthur Sweeney 
at 7:30 P.M. Prayer was offered by Rev. Frederick B. Noss. 
Selectman J. Everett Collins led in a salute to the flag. Unani- 
mous consent of the meeting to admit several non-voters was 
asked. This vote failed to pass and the applicants were not ad- 
mitted. 

The warrant and return of service by the Constable was read 
by the Town Clerk, as well as each article as it was taken up. 

(Constable's return at the end of record.) 

Article 1— To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
or take from available funds the sum of $1,200,000.00 for the pur- 
poses of acquiring land, and the construction of two elementary 
school buildings; one of twelve or eighteen basic class rooms on 
the Bartlet Street site now owned by the Town : the other of six 
basic class rooms in West Andover; $50,000.00 to be included in 
the 1951 tax levy, $75,000.00 to be taken from the post-war reha- 
bilitation fund, $275,000.00 to be taken from available funds, and 
the balance of $800,000.00 to be obtained by an issue of bonds 
payable in not over fifteen years from date of issue. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to use 
printed ballots on the final vote on Article 1. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to raise 
and appropriate or take from available funds the sum of $1,200,- 
000.00 for the purposes of acquiring land, and the construction of 
two elementary school buildings; one of twelve or eighteen basic 
class rooms on the Bartlet Street site now owned by the Town; 
the other of six basic class rooms in West Andover; $50,000.00 to 
be included in the 1951 tax levy, $75,000.00 to be taken from the 
post-war rehabilitation fund, $275,000.00 to be taken from avail- 

30 



able funds, and the balance of $800,000.00 to be obtained by an 
issue of bonds payable in not over fifteen years from date of issue. 
Counted ballots— Yes 1030; No 299. 

Article 2 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of nine hundred dollars for the continuance of Depart- 
ment of Civil Defense from January 1st, 1951, through March 
10th, 1951. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to raise 
and appropriate the sum of nine hundred dollars for the continu- 
ance of the Department of Civil Defense from January 1st, 1951, 
through March 10th, 1951. 

Article 3 — To see if the town will vote to re-zone to a private 
recreational area the following described property. 

Beginning at a point in the Northerly line of Lowell Street at 
an iron post set in the ground by land formerly of one Jefferson, 
more recently of one Bailey: thence running North 18° 15' West 
by a wall by land now or formerly of said Bailey and by land now 
or formerly of one Biederman seven hundred seventy feet to a 
corner of a wall by land retained by one Agnes Wallace; thence 
turning by a fence by said retained land; thence running South 
5°20 / West by a wall thirty feet; thence running South 78° 35' 
West by a fence twenty-five feet to a point marked by a post, 
thence turning and running South 2° East one hundred feet by a 
wall to a post; thence running South 7°45' West one hundred 
thirty-two feet by a wall to a post; thence running South 16° 35' 
West one hundred thirty-two feet by a fence to Lowell Street, 
all of said boundaries being by land retained by the said Agnes 
Wallace; thence turning and running by said Lowell Street in 
three courses: South 73° East fifty-four feet, South 30' East six 
hundred seventy-four feet and North 78° 35' East fifty-eight and 
5/10 feet to the point of the beginning, on petition of Richard K. 
Gordon and others. 

A standing vote was taken and counted. Motion was lost, Yes 
85; No 677. 

Article 4 — To see if the Town of Andover will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or transfer from available funds, the sum of $14,- 
000.00 to constitute a general raise of ten dollars a week for all 
permanent full-time employees of the Town of Andover, on peti- 
tion of Joseph E. O'Brien and others. 

31 



Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to use 
printed ballots on the final vote on Article 4. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded on Amendment to 
original motion it was VOTED that action on this article be re- 
ferred to the next regular town meeting in 1951 and that a com- 
mittee of three persons, other than elected officials or town em- 
ployees, be appointed by the Moderator to act with the heads of 
the various town departments to make a careful study of town 
salaries and wages and report their findings and recommenda- 
tions to the next annual Town Meeting. 

Counted ballots. Yes 870; No 366. 

Article 5. To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the 
Moderator appoint a building committee to carry out work 
authorized in vote on Article 1. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to give 
the building committee a vote of thanks for the excellent w T ork 
done on the subject of Article 1. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to ad- 
journ at 10:50 P.M. 

The check lists were used and 1372 voters were admitted to 
the meeting. 

(Constable's Return) 
Essex, ss. Andover, November 13, 1950 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the 
constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabitants 
of said town, to meet at the time and places and for the purposes 
stated in said warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the 
same, on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse, and in no less 
than five other public places where bills and notices are usually 
posted and by publication in the Andover Townsman. Said war- 
rants have been posted and published seven days. 

George N. Sparks, Constable 

A true record: 

Attest: 

George H. Winslow, Town Clerk 



32 



APPOINTMENTS BY MODERATOR 

School Building Committee 
(Same as appointed at Annual Town Meeting March 13, 1950) 
Herbert P. Carter Gordon L. Colquhoun Roy E. Hardy 
Harold T. Houston C. Carleton Kimball Kenneth L. Sherman 
Stanley F. Swanton 

Salary and Wage Study Committee 

Emil J. C. Shulze, Chairman 

Charles W. Arnold William S. Titcomb 



33 



State Election 

NOVEMBER 7, 1950 



Warrant 
THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Andover Greeting : 
In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified 
to vote in Elections to meet in Precincts, One, Two, Three, Four, 
Five, Six viz: The Central Fire Station, Precinct One; The 
Square and Compass Hall, Precinct Two; the Sacred Heart 
School, Balmoral Street, Precinct Three; the Grange Hall, Pre- 
cinct Four; the Ballard vale Fire Station, Precinct Five; and the 
Peabody House, Phillips Street, Precinct Six, in said Andover, on 
Tuesday, the seventh day of November, 1950, at 7:00 o'clock 
A.M., for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Election Officers for the Election 
of the following officers : 

Governor — For this Commonwealth 

Lieutenant Governor — For this Commonwealth 

Secretary — For this Commonwealth 

Treasurer — For this Commonwealth 

Auditor — For this Commonwealth 

Attorney General — For this Commonwealth 

Representative in Congress — For Fifth Congressional District 

Councillor — For Fifth Councillor District 

Senator— For Fourth Essex Senatorial District 

Three Representatives in General Court — For Fifth Essex 

Representative District ' 
District Attorney — For Eastern District 
County Commissioner — For Essex County 
Sheriff — For Essex County 

Also to vote Yes or No on the following questions: 

34 



QUESTION ,NO. 1 

Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 
Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Con- 
stitution summarized below which was approved by the General 
Court in a joint session of the two branches held June 9, 1947, 
received 244 votes in the affirmative and in the negative, and in 
a joint session of the two branches held June 8, 1949, received 
242 votes in the affirmative and 7 in the negative? 

Summary 
This proposed amendment to the Constitution provides for the 
time when the respective terms of office of the governor, lieu- 
tenant-governor and councillors shall begin and the time when 
their respective terms shall end. It also makes provision relative 
to the succession to the office of governor in the event of the death 
of the governor elect before qualification for the office of governor; 
and it further makes provision relative to the succession to the 
office of governor in the event of the death of both the governor 
elect and the lieutenant-governor elect before qualification for 
their respective offices. 

YES NO 

QUESTION NO. 2 
Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 
Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Con- 
stitution summarized below which was approved by the General 
Court in a joint session of' the two branches held June 4, 1948, 
received 154 votes in the affirmative and 44 in the negative, and 
in a joint session of the two branches held June 8, 1949, received 
160 votes in the affirmative and 93 in the negative? 

Summary 
This proposed amendment to the Constitution provides for an 
increase in the number of signatures of qualified voters required 
upon an initiative or upon a referendum petition, and it further 
makes provision for changes in legislative procedures thereon 
with reference to dates upon, or within which, acts shall be done 
in the various stages necessary to be taken upon such petitions. 

YES NO 

35 



QUESTION NO. 3 
Do you approve of a law summarized below on which the 
House of Representatives did not vote and on which the Senate 
did not vote? 

Summary 

This measure provides for minimum payment of seventy-five 

dollars per month, or eighty-five dollars per month if blind, as 

assistance to deserving aged persons who have reached the age 

of sixty-three years or over and are in need of relief and support. 

YES NO 

QUESTION NO. 4 

Do you approve of a law summarized below on which the 
House of Representatives did not vote and on which the Senate 
did not vote? 

Summary 

This measure provides for the creation of a Massachusetts 
commission for the purpose of conducting once every month a 
lottery drawing to raise additional funds by means of tickets sold 
to the public, within the Commonwealth, the net proceeds to be 
divided as follows: 50 per cent to the winners as prizes, 35 per cent 
for assistance to needy aged persons, l}/2 per cent for assistance to 
needy blind persons, 1}/% per cent for assistance to dependent 
children. 
YES NO 

QUESTION NO. 5 
Do you approve of a law summarized below which was disap- 
proved in the House of Representatives by a vote of 77 in the 
affirmative and 139 in the negative and in the Senate by a vote 
of 13 in the affirmative and 25 in the negative? 

Summary 
The proposed measure strikes out the first sentence of section 
113B of Chapter 157 of the General Laws (Tercentenary Edition) 
as most recently amended by section 4 of Chapter 459 of the acts 
of 1935, and inserts in place thereof a sentence which provides 
that the Commissioner of Insurance shall annually, on or before 
September fifteenth, after due hearing and investigation, fix and 
establish fair and reasonable classifications of risks and adequate, 

36 



just, reasonable and non-discriminatory premium charges to be 
used and charged by insurance companies in connection with the 
issue or execution of motor vehicle liability policies or bonds, as 
denned in section 34A of Chapter 90 of the General Laws, for the 
ensuing calendar year or any part thereof, but said classifications 
and premium charges shall be uniform throughout the Common- 
wealth and shall not be fixed or established according to districts 
or zones. 
YES NO 

QUESTION NO. 6 

A. Shall the pari-mutuel system of betting on licensed horse 
races be permitted in this county? 

YES NO 

B. Shall the pari-mutuel system of betting on licensed dog 
races be permitted in this county? 

YES NO 

QUESTION NO. 7 

A. Shall licenses be granted in this city (or town) for the sale 
therein of all alcoholic beverages (whiskey, rum, gin, malt bever- 
ages, wines and all other alcoholic beverages) ? 

YES NO 

B. Shall licenses be granted in this city (or town) for the sale 
therein of wines and malt beverages (wines and beer, ale and all 
other malt beverages) ? 

YES NO 

C. Shall licenses be granted in this city (or town) for the sale 
therein of all alcoholic beverages in packages, so called, not to be 
drunk on the premises? 

YES NO 

QUESTION NO. 8 

(a) If a voter desires that this city (or town) shall declare by 
popular referendum that a shortage of rental housing accommo- 
dations exists which requires the continuance of federal rent 

37 



control in this city (or town) after December thirty-first, nine- 
teen hundred and fifty, and until the close of June thirtieth, 
nineteen hundred and fifty-one, in accordance with the provisions 
of the Housing and Rent Act of 1950, he will vote YES on said 
question. 

(b) If he desires that federal rent control shall cease to be in 
effect in this city (or town) at the close of December thirty-first, 
nineteen hundred and fifty, he will vote NO on said question. If 
a majority of the votes cast in any such city or town in answer to 
said question is in the affirmative, such city or town shall be 
deemed to have declared by popular referendum, pursuant to the 
Housing and Rent Act of 1950, that a shortage of rental accom- 
modations exists which requires the continuance of federal 
rent control in such city or town after December thirty-first, nine- 
teen hundred and fifty, and until the close of June thirtieth, nine- 
teen hundred and fifty-one, in accordance with the provisions of 
said Act. If a majority of the votes cast in any such city or town 
in answer to said question, is not in the affirmative, such city or 
town shall be deemed not to have declared by popular referendum, 
pursuant to the Housing and Rent Act of 1950, that a shortage of 
rental accommodations exists which requires the continuance of 
federal rent control in such city or town after December thirty- 
first, nineteen hundred and fifty. 

Shall a declaration be made by popular referendum, pursuant 
to the Housing and Rent Act of 1950, that a shortage of rental 
housing accommodations exists which requires the continuance of 
federal rent control in such city or town after December thirty- 
first, nineteen hundred and fifty, and until the close of June thir- 
tieth, nineteen hundred and fifty-one, in accordance with the 
provisions of said Act? 
YES NO 

All the above candidates and questions to be voted for upon 
one ballot. 

The polls will be open from 7:00 A.M. to 7:00 P.M. 
Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 16th day of October A.D. 1950. 

Roy E. Hardy 
J. Everett Collins 
Sidney P. White 

Selectmen of Andover 
38 



Essex, ss. 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabitants 
of said town, to meet at the time and places and for the purposes 
stated in said warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the 
same, on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse and in no less 
than five other public places where bills and notices are usually 
posted and by publication in the Andover Townsman. Said war- 
rants have been posted and published seven days. 

George N. Sparks, Constable 

At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
qualified to vote in Elections at the designated polling places in 
Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five and Six in said Andover, 
on the Seventh day of November, 1950 





Governor 




Precincts 






12 3 4 5 


6 




357 633 471 227 236 


246 Paul A. Dever of Cambridge 


2170 


1042 588 791 443 299 


824 Arthur W. Coolidge of Reading 


3987 


4 4 3 11 


3 Horace I. Hillis of Saugus 


16 


12 4 2 1 


6 Mark R. Shaw of Melrose 


16 


18 23 8 24 4 


12 Blanks 


89 



333 


589 


433 218 199 


1058 


628 


822 451 332 


4 


5 


8 2 1 


27 


28 


14 26 9 



361 


584 


442 222 197 


1013 


606 


801 439 313 


3 


4 


5 4 6 


3 


6 


7 1 2 


42 


50 


22 31 23 



Lieutenant Governor 

209 Charles F. Jess Sullivan of Worcester 1981 

860 Laurence Curtis of Boston 4151 

2 Lawrence Gilfedder of Boston 22 

20 Blanks 124 



Secretary 

227 Edward J. Cronin of Chelsea 2033 

826 Russell A. Wood of Cambridge 3998 

9 Ellsworth J. M. Dickson of Needham 31 

1 Fred M. Ingersoll of Lynn 20 

28 Blanks 196 

39 



Treasurer 

6 

317 John E. Hurley of Boston 2384 

711 Fred J. Burrell of Medford 3618 

1 Henning A. Blomen of Boston 21 

10 Harold J. Ireland of Worcester 23 

52 Blanks 232 

Auditor 

263 Thomas J. Buckley of Boston 2225 

787 William G. Andrew of Cambridge 3792 

3 Robert A. Simmons of Boston 21 

1 Francis A. Votano of Lynn 19 

37 Blanks 221 

Attorney General 

177 Francis E. Kelly of Boston 1825 

881 Frederick Ayer, Jr., of Wenham 4233 

1 Anthony Martin of Boston 16 

5 Howard B. Rand of Haverhill 28 

27 Blanks 176 

Congressman — Fifth District 

1212 892 1004 539 452 949 Edith Nourse Rogers of Lowell 5048 

182 312 241 133 78 103 Clement G. McDonough of Lowell 1049 

1 Philip K. Allen of Andover 1 

28 46 32 25 11 38 Blanks 180 

Councillor — Fifth District 

489 664 547 281 237 277 Cornelius J. Twomey of Lawrence 2495 

911 532 705 387 284 789 Herbert S. Tuckerman 3608 

22 54 25 29 20 25 Blanks 175 

Senator — Fourth Essex District 

422 625 496 263 219 286 John W. Coddaire, Jr., of Haverhill 2311 

948 553 734 400 291 771 Archibald M. Eastabrook of Haverhill 3697 

52 72 47 34 31 34 Blanks 270 

40 







Precincts 


1 


2 


3 


4 5 


432 


643 


507 


249 236 


935 


553 


726 


410 283 


5 


4 


7 


2 2 


5 


- 


8 


- 


45 


50 


29 


36 20 


396 


617 


489 


242 218 


980 


564 


738 


425 298 


3 


5 


4 


4 2 


4 


2 


8 


2 2 


39 


62 


38 


24 21 


311 


558 


386 


203 190 


079 


639 


846 


456 332 


3 


1 


8 


3 - 


4 


4 


7 


3 5 


25 


48 


30 


32 14 



Representatives in General Court — Fifth Essex District 

6 

896 J. Everett Collins of Andover 4384 

807 Frank S. Giles, Jr., of Methuen 3777 

795 William Longworth of Methuen 3569 

133 Herbert B. Bower of Methuen 1159 

269 Joseph A. Horan of Andover 2372 

113 Walter Sliva of Lawrence 1200 

260 Blanks 2373 

District Attorney — Eastern District 

1002 630 731 416 334 801 Hugh A. Cregg of Methuen 3914 
385 569 523 252 186 270 Charles W. Trombly of North Andover 2185 

35 51 23 29 21 20 Blanks 176 

County Commissioner — Essex County 

1126 742 941499 381 904 Arthur A. Thompson of Methuen 4593 







Precincts 


1 


2 


3 4 5 


1122 


675 


859 480 352 


926 


550 


778 415 301 


887 


511 


723 390 263 


156 


334 


281 134 121 


412 


701 


503 237 250 


157 


370 


295 152 113 


606 


609 


392 283 223 



244 


438 


295 


171 


136 144 Charles M. Boyle of Peabody 


1428 


52 


70 


41 


27 


24 43 Blanks 

* 
Sheriff— Essex County 


257 


017 


607 


748 


415 


320 816 Frank E. Raymond of Salem 


3923 


359 


563 


491 


252 


196 230 Everett B. Dowe of Lawrence 


2091 


46 


80 


38 


30 


25 45 Blanks 

QUESTION NO. 1 

Amendment — Succession in Office 


264 


995 


717 


867 


423 


341 798 Yes ' 


4141 


192 


199 


166 


121 


92 130 No 


900 


23-5 


334 


244 


153 


108 163 Blanks 

QUESTION NO. 2 
A mendment — -Referendum Petitions 


1237 


716 


472 


511 


268 


204 587 Yes 


2758 


423 


433 


515 


275 


222 326 No 


2194 


283 


345 


251 


154 


115 178 Blanks 

QUESTION NO. 3 

Increased Old Age Benefits 


1326 


328 


433 


351 


190 


194 236 Yes 


1732 


947 


615 


765 


396 


301 750 No 


3 774 


147 


202 


161 


111 


46 105 Blanks 


772 



41 



QUESTION NO. 4 







Precincts 




1 


2 


3 4 5 


6 

State Lottery 


207 


266 


250 136 113 


135 Yes 


1077 


790 


869 457 369 


857 No 


138 


194 


158 104 59 


99 Blanks 

QUESTION NO. 5 
Flat Rate Insurance 


45 


43 


52 30 21 


26 Yes 


1283 


1115 


1169 614 492 


1008 No 


94 


92 


56 53 28 


57 Blanks 



1107 
4419 

752 



217 

5681 

380 

QUESTION NO. 6 

A (Pari-Mutuel Horse Races) 
438 465 441 221 217 293 Yes 2075 

820 572 689 378 249 681 No 3389 

164 213 147 98 75 117 Blanks 814 

B (Pari-Mutuel Dog Races) 

377 404 413 188 186 225 Yes 1793 

822 571 670 377 261 699 No 3400 

223 275 194 132 94 167 Blanks 1085 

QUESTION NO. 7 

A — (All-Alcoholic on premises) 
805 833 826 431 356 630 Yes 3881 

494 264 321 187 136 369 No 1771 

123 153 130 79 49 92 Blanks 626 

QUESTION NO. 7 

B — (Wines and Malt Beverages) 
793 793 809 423 347 629 Yes 3794 

447 232 288 169 119 323 No 1578 

182 225 180 105 75 139 Blanks 906 

QUESTION NO. 7 

C — (Packages) 
873 842 858 452 365 736 Yes 4126 

402 200 267 155 110 239 No 1373 

147 208 152 90 66 116 Blanks 779 

42 



QUESTION NO. 8 

Precincts 
1 2 3 4 5 6 

Rent Control 
656 645 633 286 266 493 Yes 2979 

474 311 377 229 150 385 No 1926 

292 294 267 182 125 213 Blanks 1373 

TOTAL VOTE 
1422 1250 1277 697 541 1091 6278 



District Vote — Representative 5th Essex District 





id P4 
o ^ 
U 


Giles 

(R) 


O 


Bower 
(D) 


Horan 
(D) 


Sliva 

(D) 


Andover 


4384 


3777 


3569 


1159 


2372 


1200 


Lawrence — Ward 1 


1602 


2451 


1688 


2824 


3390 


3450 


Methuen — Precinct 1 


1165 


1511 


1593 


1018 


857 


665 


Methuen — Precinct 2 


445 


637 


639 


793 


675 


570 


Methuen — Precinct 4 


675 


1291 


919 


828 


694 


638 


Methuen — Precinct 5 


854 


1144 


1127 


855 


725 


505 


North Andover 


2152 


2142 


2195 


1273 


1761 


1343 



11277 12953 11730 8750 10474 8371 

REPORT OF CLERK— PRECINCT 1 

Andover, November 7th, 1950 
Polls opened at 7 A.M. Warden in charge, Rowland L. Luce. 
Ballot box registered when polls opened, 0000. 
Polls closed at 7 P.M. Ballot box registered when polls closed, 
1422. Number of absentee ballots received — 44. Number of bal- 
lots received — 1887. Number of ballots returned — 509. Number 
of ballots cast — 1422. Police officer on duty — John Deyermond. 
Voted to count ballots at 7:30 A.M. 

Joseph W. McNally, Clerk 

43 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 2 

Andover, November 7th, 1950 
Polls opened at 7 A.M. Warden in charge, Mark Keane. 
Ballot box registered when polls opened, 0000. 
Polls closed at 7 P.M. Ballot box registered when polls closed, 
1239. Number of ballots received, 1778. Number of ballots re- 
turned, 539. Number of ballots cast, 1239. Police officer on duty — 
David Nicoll. Voted to count ballots at 7:45 A.M. 

Norman K. MacLeish, Clerk 

REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 3 

Andover, November 7th, 1950 
Polls opened at 7:00 A.M. Warden in charge, Stafford A. Lind- 
say. 

Ballot box registered when polls opened, 0000. 
Polls closed at 7:00 P.M. Ballot box registered when polls 
closed, 1277. Number of ballots received, 1762. Number of bal- 
lots returned, 485. Number of ballots cast, 1277. Police officer on 
duty, Richard Caldwell. Voted to count ballots at 7:15 A.M. 

Garrett J. Burke, Clerk 

REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 4 

Andover, November 7th, 1950 
Polls opened at 7 A.M. Warden in charge, Francis E. Wilson. 
Ballot box registered when polls opened, 0000. 
Polls closed at 7 P.M. Ballot box registered when polls closed, 
686. Number of ballots received, 870. Number of ballots returned, 
184. Number of ballots cast, 686. Police officer on duty, Raymond 
Collins. Voted to count ballots at 9 A.M. 

Frederick J. Kearn, Clerk 

REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 5 

Andover, November 7th, 1950 

Polls opened at 7 A.M. Warden in charge, William Miller, Jr. 

Ballot box registered when polls opened, 0000. 

Polls closed at 7 P.M. Ballot box registered when polls closed, 

541. Number of ballots received, 718. Number of ballots returned, 

180. Number of ballots cast, 541. Police officer on duty, George 

N. Sparks. Voted to count ballots at 9:15 A.M. 

Eugene A. Zalla, Clerk 

44 



REPORT OF CLERK, PRECINCT 6 

Andover, November 7th, 1950 
Polls opened at 7:00 A.M. Warden in charge. Ralph Bailey. 
Ballot box registered when polls opened, 0000. 
Polls closed at 7:00 P.M. Ballot box registered when polls 
closed, 1091. Number of ballots received, 1383. Number of ab- 
sentee ballots received, 48. Total 1431. Number of ballots re- 
turned, 340. Number of ballots cast, 1091. Police officer on duty, 
Joseph O'Brien. Voted to count ballots at 8:00 A.M. 

John M. Lynch, Clerk 

The foregoing is a true copy of the warrant and of the officers' 
return on the same, also a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

Attest: 

George H. Winslow, Town Clerk 



45 



Report of the Town Clerk 



To the Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report for the office of the Town Clerk for 
the year 1950. 

The total number of registered voters in Andover at the close 
of registration, October 6, 1950, was 7277 by precincts as follows : 

1 1608 

2 1487 

3 1503 

4 806 

5 637 

6 1236 



7277 



VITAL STATISTICS 



Number of births recorded 








221 


Males 








107 


Females 








114 


Number of deaths recorded 








145 


Males 








67 


Females 








78 


Number of marriages 








145 


Respectfully submitted, 






George 


H. 


Winslow, Town Clerk 



46 



Report of Director of Accounts 

July 21, 1950. 
To the Board of Selectmen 
Mr. Roy E. Hardy, Chairman 
Andover, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen : 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the books and ac- 
counts of the town of Andover for the fiscal year ending December 
31, 1949, made in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 44, 
General Laws. This is in the form of a report made to me by Mr. 
Herman B. Dine, Assistant Director of Accounts. 

Very truly yours, 
Francis X. Lang 

Director of Accounts 



Mr. Francis X. Lang 

Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

State House, Boston 

Sir: 

As directed by you, I have made an audit of the books and 
accounts of the town of Andover for the fiscal year ending De- 
cember 31, 1949, and report thereon as follows: 

An examination and verification was made of the recorded 
financial transactions of the town as shown on the books of the 
departments receiving or disbursing money or committing bills 
for collection. 

The books and accounts of the town accountant were examined 
and checked in detail. The recorded receipts were compared with 
the departmental records of payments to the treasurer and with 
the treasurer's record of receipts, while the recorded payments 
were checked with the treasury warrants and with the treasurer's 
records of disbursements. 



47 



The appropriations and transfers as recorded on the ledger 
were compared with the town clerk's record of financial votes 
passed at town meetings and with the records of the finance com- 
mittee. 

The ledger was analyzed, a trial balance was drawn off proving 
the ledger to be in balance, and a balance sheet showing the 
financial condition of the town on December 31, 1949 was pre- 
pared and is appended to this report. 

The books and accounts in the town treasurer's office were 
examined and checked. The cash book was footed throughout, 
the receipts being analyzed and compared with the departmental 
records of payments to the treasurer, with other sources from 
which the town received money, and with the town accountant's 
books. The recorded payments were checked with the selectmen's 
warrants authorizing the disbursement of town funds. 

The cash balance on December 31, 1949 was verified by recon- 
ciliation of the bank balances with statements furnished by the 
banks in which town money is deposited and by actual count of 
the cash in the office. 

The recorded payments on account of debt and interest were 
checked with the amounts falling due and with the cancelled 
securities and coupons on file. 

The transactions of the several trust, investment, and retire- 
ment funds in the custody of the town treasurer and the treasur- 
ers of the John Cornell, Punchard Free School, and Memorial 
Hall Library funds were verified, and the securities and savings 
bank books representing the investment of these funds were ex- 
amined and listed. 

The tax titles and tax possessions held by the town were listed 
from the records kept by the treasurer and all transactions per- 
taining thereto were verified and checked with the records at the 
Registry of Deeds. 

The records of deductions from employees' salaries for federal 
taxes, for the purchase of savings bonds, and for Blue Cross and 
Blue Shield were examined and checked. The payments to the 
Collector of Internal Revenue and for the purchase of bonds, as 
well as the payments to the Massachusetts Hospital Service, Inc., 
were verified. 

The books and accounts in the tax collector's office were ex- 
amined and checked. The taxes, excise, and assessments out- 

48 



standing at the time of the previous audit and all subsequent 
commitments were audited and compared with the assessors' 
warrants. The cash receipts as posted in the commitment books 
were compared with the cash book record of collections, the 
abatements were compared with the assessors' record of abate- 
ments granted, the payments to the treasurer were verified, and 
the outstanding accounts were listed and proved with the control 
accounts in the accountant's ledger. 

The town clerk's records of sporting, dog, and town licenses, as 
well as of permits, recording fees, etc., were examined and 
checked. The payments to the Division of Fisheries and Game 
were verified by comparison with the receipts on file, and the 
payments to the town treasurer were compared with the treas- 
urer's cash book. 

The surety bonds of the officials required by law to furnish 
them were examined and found to be in proper form. 

The records of departmental accounts receivable were ex- 
amined. The payments to the treasurer were verified, the abate- 
ments were checked, and the outstanding accounts were listed 
and reconciled with the accountant's ledger accounts. 

The books and accounts of the public works department were 
examined. The records of water and sewer charges were examined 
and checked. The recorded collections were compared with the 
payments to the treasurer, the abatements as recorded were 
verified, and the outstanding accounts were listed and reconciled 
with the town accountant's ledger accounts. 

Verification of the outstanding tax, excise, assessment, de- 
partmental, and water accounts was made by sending notices to 
a number of persons whose names appeared on the books as owing 
money to the town, and from the replies received it appears that 
the accounts, as listed, are correct. 

The records of cash receipts of the sealer of weights and 
measures, of the inspectors of buildings, wires, and plumbing, 
of the health, police, school, and library departments, and of all 
other departments wherein money is collected for the town were 
examined and checked, the payments to the treasurer and the 
cash on hand being verified. 

Appended to this report, in addition to the balance sheet, arc 
tables showing a reconciliation of the treasurer's and the town 
clerk's cash, summaries of the tax, excise, assessment, tax title, 

49 



departmental, and water accounts, as well as tables showing the 
condition and transactions of the trust, investment, and munici- 
pal contributory retirement funds. 

For the cooperation extended by the several town officials 
during the audit, I wish, on behalf of my assistants and for my- 
self, to express appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Herman B. Dine, 

Assistant Director of Accounts 



50 



Report of the 
Town Accountant 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES FOR THE YEAR 
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1950 



To the Board of Selectmen, 

Andover, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

In accordance with Chapter 41, Section 61, of the General 
Laws, I submit herewith my annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1950. 

A detailed statement of the receipts and their sources, and of 
the payments and the purposes therefor, follows. The condition 
of the various trust funds, as well as the Town of Andover Re- 
tirement Fund, sources of incomes and the amounts paid out are 
also set forth. A statement of the temporary loans, maturing 
debt and interest is included. 

A balance sheet, which is appended to this report, was pre- 
pared showing the assets and liabilities as of December 31, 1950. 

The State Accountants have complied with statutes and audit- 
ed the Town books for the year ending December 31, 1949. They 
are expected in the near future to audit the Town's accounts for 
1950. 

May I express my thanks for the co-operation accorded to me 
by your Board, as well as by each Town Department during the 
past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George C. Napier, 

Town Accountant 



51 



Appropriations for 1950 



APPROPRIATIONS 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 13, 1950 

General Government $ 46,471.00 
Protection to Persons and Property 172,151.00 

Health and Sanitation 34,292 . 40 

Highways 125,700.00 

Charities and Veterans' Service 127,800 . 00 

Schools and Libraries 376,947 . 78 

Recreation and Unclassified 82,346.50 

Enterprises and Cemeteries 135,450.00 

Interest and Maturing Debt 41,646.25 



Total Appropriations, March 13, 1950 $1,142,804.93 

APPROPRIATIONS 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, NOVEMBER 13, 1950 
(To be raised in 1951) 

Article 1 , School Construction $50,000 . 00 

Article 2, Dept. of Civilian Defense 900.00 



Total Appropriations, November 13, 1950 $50,900.00 



Receipts for 1950 



Tax Collector $834, 178.98 

Treasurer, Dog Tax, Historical Booklets 2,193.33 

Town Clerk, Fees and Licenses 3,695.50 

Board of Selectmen, Licenses 7,193.00 

Police Department: 

Fines and Permits $ 446 . 00 

Parking Meters 10,362 . 78 

Insurance for Damages, Etc. 27.04 

10,835.82 



Amount Carried Forward $858,096.63 

52 



Amount Brought Forward 

Fire Department, Ambulance, Oil Burner 

Inspections, Sale of Truck 
Municipal Buildings, Rentals 
Building Inspector's Fees 
Wire Inspector's Fees 
Sealer of Weights and Measures Fees 
Public Weigher's Fees 
Board of Health, Licenses and Fees 
Health and Sanitation, Fees 

Board of Public Works, Sale of 
Scrap and Boat Licenses 

Highways : 

Board of Public Works Machinery 

Account $ 507 . 95 

From State: 

For Snow Plowing 130 . 00 

Div. of Highways, Chapter 90 

Contract 1 1 798 Maint. 1 ,000 . 00 

Contract 12422 Constr. 7,329.01 

From County: 

Contract 12422 Constr. 3,664.50 

Curbings 16.50 

Infirmary 

Reimbursements for Public Welfare 

Aid to Dependent Children 

Old Age Assistance 

Veterans' Service 
Veterans' Service, Photostats, Sale 

and Surveying of Veterans' Lots 
School Department, Tuition, Rentals and Other 
Library Department, Income, Fines, Etc. 
Recreation, Refreshment Stand Pomps Pond 
Water Department, Rates and Services, Misc. 
Cemetery Department 

Amount Carried Forward 



8,096. 


63 


481 


.50 


610 


.65 


2,937 


.00 


629 


.00 


323 


.80 


161 


.00 


643 


.00 


2,692 


.01 



41.75 



$12,647.96 

$ 2,600.60 

3,313.39 

5,280.62 

49,109.49 

3,767.23 

31.46 
7,099.89 
4,193.31 

50.00 

68,180.04 

4,819.85 

$1,027,710. 18 



53 



Amount Brought Forward $1,027,710. 18 

Trust and Investments: 

Perpetual Cares $3,715 . 78 

Trust Funds 1,842.45 

5,558.23 

Withholding Taxes 53,091 . 00 

Savings Bonds 4,355.98 

Blue Cross 5,301.98 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts: 

Reimburse Loss Taxes 956.91 

Vocational Education 973 . 95 

Smith-Hughes-George-Barden Funds 27.22 

Income Taxes 

Corporation Taxes 

Meal Taxes 

Income Taxes School Aid 

School Transportation 

Hawkers' and Pedlers' Licenses 

Aid to Dependent Children Grants 

Old Age Assistance Grants 

Punchard Athletic Association 

School Lunch 

Refunds 

Total Receipts, 1950 



76,957.14 




117,482.16 




2,481.87 




1,365.00 




5,006.00 




136.00 




6,227.48 




62,690.70 




1,098.05 




12,913.19 






$288,315.67 






572.91 




$1,384,905.95 



54 



Expenditures for 1950 



APPROPRIATION ACCOUNTS 



CIVILIAN DEFENSE 






Cr. 






Reserve Fund 






$1,500.00 


Revenue 1951 


Dr. 




900.00 


Salary, Director 




$ 968.00 




Office Maintenance 




447 . 73 




Use of Car and Other 




70.33 




Total Expenditures 


$1,486.06 




Revenue 1951 




900.00 




Balance to Reserve Fu 


nd 


13.94 






$2,400.00 


$2,400.00 


SELECTMEN 






Cr. 






Appropriation 


Dr. 




$2,655.00 


Salaries, Selectmen 




$1,000.00 




Salaries, Clerks 




950.00 




Perambulation of Town Bounds 


76.57 




Office Maintenance and Other 




389.67 




Total Expenditures 


$2,416.24 




Balance to Revenue 




238.76 






$2,655.00 


$2,655.00 



55 



ACCOUNTANT 






Cr. 






Appropriation 


Dr. 




$4,627.00 


Salary, Accountant 




$3,343.00 




Salary, Clerk 




824.00 




Office Maintenance 




358.89 




Total Expenditures 


$4,525.89 




Balance to Revenue 




101.11 






$4,627.00 


$4,627.00 


TREASURER 






Cr. 






Appropriation 


Dr. 




$4,516.00 


Salary, Treasurer 




$3,340.00 




Salaries, Clerks 




505.60 




Office Maintenance 




654.37 




Total Expenditures 


$4,499.97 




Balance to Revenue 




16.03 






$4,516.00 


$4,516.00 


TAX COLLECTOR 






Cr. 






Apppropriation 


Dr. 




$7,134.00 


Salary, Tax Collector 




$3,415.00 




Salary, Clerk 




2,262.00 




Office Maintenance 




1,443.57 




Total Expenditures 


$7,120.57 




Balance to Revenue 




13.43 






$7,134.00 


$7,134.00 



56 



ASSESSORS 
Cr. 



Appropriation 
Petty Cash Refund 


Dr. 




$8,305.00 
5.00 


Salaries, Assessors 




$1,200.00 




Assistant Assessors 




750.00 




Salaries, Clerks 




3,380.00 




Engineering 

Office Maintenance and Other 




2,198.51 
780.58 





Total Expenditures 
Balance to Revenue 



,309.09 
.91 









$8,310.00 


$8,310.00 




TOWN CLERK 




Appropriation 

Salary, Town Clerk 
Salary, Clerk 
Office Maintenance 


nditures 
Revenue 


Cr. 
Dr. 


vS3,434.50 

1,867.50 

268.78 


$5,606.00 


Total Expe 
Balance to 


$5,570.78 
35.22 






$5,606.00 


s$5,606.00 




MODERATOR 




Appropriation 

Salary, Moderator 
Balance to Revenue 




Cr. 
Dr. 


$20.00 
10.00 


S30.00 



S30.00 



57 



S30.00 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Cr. 

Appropriation $20 . 00 

Dr. 
Membership Fee $10.00 

Balance to Revenue 10.00 



$20.00 

TOWN COUNSEL 

Cr. 

Appropriation 

Dr. 
Salary, Town Counsel $500 . 00 
Court Services, Etc. 244 . 30 


$20.00 
$750.00 


Total Expenditures 
Balance to Revenue 


$744.30 
5.70 





$750.00 $750.00 

DOG OFFICER 

Cr. 

Appropriation $225 . 00 

Dr. 

Salary, Dog Officer $225 . 00 







$225.00 


ANIMAL INSPECTOR 






Cr. 






Appropriation 


Dr. 






Salary, Animal Inspector 


/ 


$325. 


.00 


Balance to Revenue 




25, 


00 



$225.00 



$350.00 



$350.00 $350.00 

58 



PLANNING BOARD AND BOARD OF SURVEY 

Cr. 

Appropriation $200 . 00 

Dr. 



Salary, Clerk 




$100.00 




Balance to Revenue 




100.00 






$200.00 


$200.00 


ELECTION AND REGISTRATION 






Cr. 






Appropriation 






$5,185.00 


Reserve Fund 


Dr. 




1,500.00 


Salaries, Clerks 




$ 220.70 




Salaries, Registrars 




408.00 




Assistant Registrars 




750.00 




Election Officers 




2,118.00 




Election Expenses 




891.86 




Street Lists 




481.00 




Printing and Advertising 




1,584.63 




Office Maintenance 




145.68 




Total Expenditures 


$6,599.87 




Balance to Reserve Fund 


85.13 





.,685.00 $6,685.00 



MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS 
Cr. 

Appropriation 

Dr. 
Salary, Janitor 
Extra Janitorial Service 
Fuel 

Lawrence Gas and Electric Company 
Repairs and Maintenance 
Janitor's Supplies 

Total Expenditures 
Balance to Revenue 



59 





$6,868.00 


$2,443.50 




34.00 




1,141.60 




618.01 




1,394.35 




406.53 




$6,042.99 




825.01 




$6,868.00 


$6,868.00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Cr. 

Appropriation $62,688 . 00 

Parking Meters Receipts 2 ,000 . 00 

Refunds 5.94 

Dr. 
Salaries : 

Chief $ 3,779.50 

Patrolmen 47,988.06 

Clerk, Special Police, Matron and 

Other Employees 4,628 . 91 

Office Maintenance and Other 1,093 . 54 

Equipment Maintenance 3,896.34 

Traffic Lights, Signs and Signals 1,254.62 

Equipment for Men 526.82 



Total Expenditures $63,167 . 79 

Balance to Revenue 1,526.15 



$64,693.94 $64,693.94 

ARTICLE 5— POLICE DEPARTMENT— TWO NEW 
AUTOMOBILES 

Cr. 

Appropriation 
Refund 

Dr. 

Purchase Two New Automobiles 
Change Over Radio Equipment 

Total Expenditures 
Balance to 1951 

$2,447.94 $2,447.94 

ARTICLE 6— FIRE DEPARTMENT— OIL BURNER UNIT 
AND BOILER INCLUDING FUEL TANKS 

Cr. 

Appropriation $1 ,300 . 00 

60 



$2,166.30 
141.53 


$2,266.00 
181.94 


$2,307.83 
140.11 





Amount Brought Forward 

Dr. 

Installation Oil Burner Unit 
Specifications for Boiler 


$1,275.00 
25.00 


$1,300.00 




$1,300.00 


$1,300.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 





Gr. 






Appropriation 


Dr. 




$75,838.00 


Salaries : 








Chief 




$ 3,932.50 




Firemen 




57,630.65 




Callmen 




4,064.61 




Ambulance Assistance and 








Other Employees 




202 . 00 




Apparatus, Hose and Truck 








Maintenance 




2,919.65 




Equipment 




1,117.89 




Equipment for Men 




607 . 00 




Alarm Boxes, Etc. 




603 . 00 




Fuel 




1,244.38 




Lawrence Gas and Electric Company 


690.49 




Maint. of Buildings and Grounds 


2,098.36 




Office Maintenance and Other 




711.48 




Total Expenditures 


$ 75,822.01 




Balance to Revenue 




15.99 






$75,838.00 


$75,838.00 


BUILDING INSPECTOR 






Gr. 






Appropriation 






$1,100.00 



61 



Amount Brought Forward $1,100.00 

Dr. 

Salary, Building Inspector $ 750.00 

Use of Car, Supplies, Etc. 303.04 



Total Expenditures $1,053 . 04 

Balance to Revenue 46.96 



$1,100.00 

WIRE INSPECTOR 

Cr. 

Appropriation 

Dr. 

Salary, Wire Inspector $600 . 00 
Use of Car 125.00 


$1,100.00 
$925.00 


Total Expenditures $725 . 00 
Balance to Revenue 200 . 00 





$925.00 $925.00 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Cr. 

Appropriation $600 . 00 

Dr. 

Salary, Sealer Weights and Measures $475 . 00 
Use of Car, Supplies, Etc. 120 . 26 



Total Expenditures $595 . 26 




Balance to Revenue 4 . 74 




$600.00 


$600 . 000 


MOTH SUPPRESSION 




Cr. 




Appropriation 


$7,958.00 


Refund 


13.41 



62 



Amount Brought Forward 



$7,971.41 



Dr. 

Salary, Moth Superintendent 

Labor 

Office Maintenance and Other 

Gas, Oil and Truck Maintenance 

Insecticides, Hardware and Tools 

Total Expenditures 
Balance to Revenue 



$1,044 


.00 


4,051, 


.18 


127 


,25 


782 


.90 


1,344 


19 


$7,349 


.52 


621. 


89 



$7,971.41 



,971.41 



ARTICLE 22— CONTROL DUTCH ELM DISEASE 

Cr. 



Appropriation 

Salary, Superintendent 

Labor 

Insecticides, Tools and Other 



Dr. 



$ 372.00 
2,146.48 
1,481.52 

$4,000.00 



$4,000.00 



$4,000.00 



ARTICLE 23— NEW TRUCK 
MOTH AND TREE DEPARTMENTS 



Appropriation 

Purchase New Truck 
Balance to 1951 


Cr. 

Dr. 

$1,588.97 
111.03 


$1,700.00 


Appropriation 


$1,700.00 

TREE WARDEN 
Cr. 


$1,700.00 
$11,476.00 



63 



Amount Brought Forward $11,476.00 

Dr. 

Salary, Tree Warden $ 1,730.00 

Labor 8,256.33 

Gasoline, Oil and Truck Maintenance 721 . 54 
Trees, Insecticides, Equipment 

and Tools 624.87 

Office Maintenance 135 . 16 



Total Expenditures $11,467 . 90 
Balance to Revenue 8 . 10 


$11,476.00 


$11,476.00 


FOREST FIRES 




Cr. 

ropriation 

isfer from Reserve Fund 


$1,800.00 
2,343.30 



Dr. 

Salary, Fire Warden $ 225 . 00 

Wages, Fighting Fires, Repair Work 931.00 

Purchase New Truck 1,926.30 

Gas, Oil and Truck Maintenance 1,032.22 



Total Expenditures $4,114.52 

Balance to Reserve Fund 28.78 



143.30 $4,143.30 



ARTICLE 7— TWO WAY RADIO— FOREST FIRE DEPT. 

Cr. 

Appropriation $500 . 00 

Dr. 
Purchase Two Way Radio $500 . 00 



$500.00 $500.00 

64 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 



Gr. 






Appropriation 




$5,500.00 


Reserve Fund 




1,000.00 


Petty Cash Refund 




10.00 


Dr. 






Salaries, Board of Health 


$ 300.00 




Salary, Agent 


2,400.00 




Additional Clerical Assistance 


140.00 




Office Maintenance 


326.74 




Rabies Vaccine and Dog Vaccinations 


293.00 




Baby Clinic 


369.17 




Milk Inspector, Salary and Expenses 


288.22 




Agent, Use of Car 


400.00 




Plumbing Inspections 


844.00 




Board and Treatment Hospitals 


1,000.75 




Recording Vital Statistics 


15.50 




Total Expenditures 


$6,377.38 




Balance to Reserve Fund 


132.62 






$6,510.00 


$6,510.00 



CARE AND TREATMENT OF TUBERCULAR PATIENTS 

Gr. 

Appropriation $4,000 . 00 

Dr. 
Care and Treatment of Tubercular 

Patients $1,753.50 

Balance to Revenue 2,246 . 50 



$4,000.00 $4,000.00 



ESSEX COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL 

Cr. 

Appropriation $16,942.40 

65 



Amount Brought Forward $16,942.40 

Dr. 

Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital $15,590 . 32 
Balance to 1951 1,352.08 





$16,942.40 


$16,942.40 


PUBLIC DUMP 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$1,500.00 


Dr. 






Salary, Keeper of Dump 


$1,040.00 




Trees 


78.00 




Total Expenditures 


$1,118.00 




Balance to Revenue 


382.00 






$1,500.00 


$1,500.00 


SEWER MAINTENANCE 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$6,350.00 



Dr. 

Labor $4,121.55 

Tools and Equipment 96 . 26 

Lawrence Gas and Electric Company 2,081 . 89 

Miscellaneous 32 . 75 



Total Expenditures $6,332 . 45 

Balance to Revenue 17.55 



$6,350.00 $6,350.00 



ARTICLE 4— SEWER— MORTON STREET 

Cr. 

Balance from 1949 $3,231 . 03 

66 



Amount Brought Forward $3,231 .03 

Dr. 

Labor $ 45 . 26 

Tarvia 114.21 



Total Expenditures $ 159.47 

Transferred to Surplus Revenue 2,831.03 
Balance to 1951 240.53 



$3,231.03 $3,231.03 



ARTICLE 19— SEWER SPECIAL COMMITTEE STUDY 

Cr. 

Balance from 1949 $716 . 50 

Dr. 
Engineering $230.43 

Balance to 1951 486.07 



$716.50 $716.50 



ARTICLE 44— SEWER— CHESTNUT STREET 

Cr. 

Balance from 1949 $3,553 . 13 



»r 


$ 274.84 


ia and Roller 


198.87 



Total Expenditures $ 473.71 

Transferred to Surplus Revenue 2,953. 13 
Balance to 1951 126.29 



$3,553.13 $3,553.13 

HIGHWAYS MAINTENANCE 

Cr. 

Appropriation $56,300 . 00 

67 



Amount Brought Forward $56,300.00 

Dr. 

Labor $35,456.78 
Equipment, Repairs and Maintenance 2,756.08 

Sand, Gravel and Cement 787.96 

Asphalt, Tarvia and Road Oil 15,137.34 

Transportation 366 . 85 

Telephone and Other 288 . 59 



Total Expenditures $54,793 . 60 

Balance to Revenue 1,506.40 



$56,300.00 $56,300.00 

TRUCKS, GARAGE AND REPAIR SHOP MAINTENANCE 

Cr. 



Appropriation 




$10,450.00 


Dr. 






Labor 


$3,297.36 




Shop Maintenance 


604.08 




Gas, Oil and Truck Maintenance 


5,843.19 




Hardware, Tools, Etc. 


705.37 





$10,450.00 $10,450.00 



ARTICLE 7— NEW BRIDGE— CENTRAL STREET 

Cr. 

Balance from 1949 $1,372.47 

Dr. 

Labor $ 70.68 



Expenditures $ 70.68 

Transferred to Surplus Revenue 1,301 . 79 



$1,372.47 $1,372.47 

68 



ARTICLE 8— CHAPTER 90 WORK— MAINTENANCE 

Cr. 

Appropriation $3,000 . 00 

Dr. 

Labor $ 708.64 

Crushed Stone 607 . 30 

Tarvia, Oil 1,581.76 



Total Expenditures $2,897 . 70 

Balance to 1951 102.30 







$3,000.00 


$3,000.00 


ARTICLE 9— CHAPTER 90 WORK— IMPROVEMENT OF 


MAIN STREET 






Cr. 






Appropriation 






$4,000.00 


Surplus Revenue 


Dr. 




12,000.00 


Labor 




$ 725.19 




Tarvia, Concrete, Etc. 




13,275.27 




Use of Compressor, Police 




657.55 




Total Expenditures 


$14,658.01 




Balance to 1951 




1,341.99 






$16,000.00 


$16,000.00 



ARTICLE 11— REPAIR AND BUILD SIDEWALKS 

Cr. 

Appropriation $7,500 . 00 

Dr. 
Labor $2,610.03 

Equipment 435.54 

Tarvia and Gravel 1 ,909 . 68 



Total Expenditures $4,955 . 25 

Balance to 1951 2,544.75 



$7,500.00 $7,500.00 



69 



ARTICLE 12- TRACTOR WITH ATTACHMENTS 

Cr. 

Appropriation $2,500 . 00 

Dr. 

Purchase Ford Tractor $2,500 . 00 



$2,500.00 $2,500.00 



ARTICLE 14— CHANDLER ROAD 
LAND ACQUISITION AND CONSTRUCTION 



Appropriation 

Purchase Land 

Labor and Recording Fee 


Cr. 
Dr. 


$300.00 

148.05 


Total Expenditures 
Balance to 1951 


$448.05 
1.95 



$450.00 



$450.00 $450.00 



ARTICLE 15— NORTH STREET 


LAND ACQUISITION AND CONSTRUCTION 


Cr. 




Appropriation 


S250.00 


Dr. 




Purchase Land 


$175.00 


Labor and Recording Fee 


66.97 


Total Expenditures 


$241.97 


Balance to 1951 


8.03 



S250.00 $250.00 
70 



ARTICLE 16— WIDENING STEVENS STREET 

Cr. 

Appropriation s $2,500 . 00 

Dr. 
Labor $1,295.72 

Equipment, Tarvia, and Gravel 491 . 94 



Total Expenditures $1,787.66 

Balance to 1951 712.34 



$2,500.00 $2,500.00 



ARTICLE 19— REPAIR ANDOVER STREET BRIDGE 

Cr. 

Balance from 1949 $6,103 . 04 

Dr. 

Labor $ 306.90 

Lumber, Nails, Carpenters 4,431.67 

Painting and Other 384 . 14 



Total Expenditures $5,122.71 

Balance to 1951 980.33 



$6,103.04 $6,103.04 



ARTICLE 38— WIDENING DASCOMB ROAD 

Cr. 

Balance from 1949 $675.01 

Dr. 
Labor $ 19.80 



Expenditures $ 19.80 

Transferred to Surplus Revenue 655 . 2 1 



$675.01 $675.01 

71 



ARTICLE 54— DASCOMB ROAD 
WIDENING AND RETAINING WALL 

Cr. 

Balance from 1949 $1,500.00 

Dr. 
Purchase of Land and Recording Deed $ 254 . 50 
Labor 11.00 

Planting of Trees 209 . 00 



Total Expenditures 


$ 474.50 




Balance to 1951 


1,025.50 






$1,500.00 


$1,500.00 


SNOW REMOVAL AND SANDING 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$15,500.00 


Dr. 






Labor 


$10,933.52 




Plowing and Sanding Roads 


1,548.98 




Tools, Equipment and Repairs 


1,099.75 




Gasoline and Oil 


309.93 




Salt and Sand 


1,364.40 




Weather Service, Transportation 






and Other 


223.48 




Total Expenditures 


$15,480.06 




Balance to Revenue 


19.94 






$15,500.00 


$15,500.00 


STREET LIGHTING 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$23,250.00 


Dr. 






Street Lighting 


$22,776.13 




Balance to Revenue 


473.87 






$23,250.00 


$23,250.00 



72 



PUBLIC WELFARE 



Appropriation 



Gr. 



Dr. 



Salaries, Board of Public Welfare 


$ 300.00 


Salary, Agent 


645.00 


Clerk 


351.00 


Groceries and Provisions 


1,694.00 


Fuel 


166.00 


Board and Care 


1,054.64 


Medicine and Medical Attendance 


885.95 


State Institutions 


2,820.38 


Cash Grants to Individuals 


5,625.70 


Relief by Other Cities and Towns 


987.53 


Total Expenditures 


$14,530.20 


Balance to Revenue 


3,469.80 




$18,000.00 



$18,000.00 



$18,000.00 



AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN 




(TOWN 






Cr. 




Appropriation 


Dr. 


$13,200.00 


Administration: 






Salary, Agent 




$ 370.30 


Clerk 




296.88 


Office Maintenance 




54.10 


Aid: 






Aid to Dependent Children 


11,317.40 



Total Expenditures 
Balance to Revenue 



$12,038.68 
1,161.32 



$13,200.00 $13,200 00 



73 



AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN 
(FEDERAL GRANTS) 





Cr. 






Federal Grants Received in 


1950 




$6,227.48 


Recovery 


Dr. 




90.00 


Administration : 








Salary, Agent 




$ 277.70 




Clerk 




106.12 




Office Maintenance 




39.66 




Aid: 








Aid to Dependent Child 


ren 


4,263.85 





Total Expenditures $4,687 . 33 

Balance to 1951 1,630.15 



$6,317.48 $6,317.48 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 






(TOWN) 








Cr. 






Appropriation 






$72,500.00 


Refunds 


Dr. 




162.60 


Administration : 








Salary, Agent 




$ 587.67 




Clerk 




444.57 




Office Maintenance 




50.42 




Aid: 








Old Age Assistance 




66,078.34 





Paid to Other Cities and Towns 2,325.73 



Total Expenditures $69,486 . 73 

Balance to Revenue 3,175.87 



$72,662.60 $72,662.60 

74 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 




(FEDERAL GRANTS) 






Cr. 






Federal Grants Received in 1950 




$62,690.70 


Refund 


Dr. 




23.15 


Administration : 








Salary, Agent 




$ 1,776.84 




Clerk 




1,037.43 




Office Maintenance 




232.78 




Aid: 








Old Age Assistance 




59,264.31 




Total Expenditures 


$62,311.36 




Balance to 1951 




402.49 






$62,713.85 


$62,713.85 


INFIRMARY 






Cr. 






Appropriation 


Dr. 




$11,100.00 


Salary, Matron 




$ 1,040.00 




Other Employees 




2,790.40 




Groceries and Provisions 




3,072.99 




Dry Goods and Clothing 




111.33 




Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds 664.70 




Fuel and Electricity 




1,151.31 




Household Furnishings and Supplies 


456.57 




Medicine and Medical Services 


395 . 40 




Miscellaneous Expenses 




334.29 




Total Expenditures 


$10,016.99 




Balance to Revenue 




1,083.01 






$11,100.00 


$11,100.00 



75 



VETERANS SERVICE 



. Cr. 






Appropriation 




$13,000.00 


Transfer from Reserve Fund 




1,500.00 


Dr. 






Administration : 






Salary, Agent 


$ 3,549.00 




Clerk 


2,021.50 




Clerk, Photostats 


87.10 




Office Maintenance 


371.77 




Veterans Benefits: 






Cash Allowance 


5,633.79 




Groceries, Provisions, Fuel 






and Other 


904.14 




Board and Care 


135.00 




Medicine and Medical Care 


1,521.25 




Total Expenditures 


$14,223.55 




Balance to Reserve Fund 


276.45 





$14,500.00 $14,500.00 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 
Cr. 



Appropriation 




$335,273.00 


Refunds 


Dr. 


34.80 


Salaries, Superintendent 


$ 6,811.80 




Clerks 


5,653.98 




Truant Officer 


100.00 




Office Maintenance 


2,298.54 




Teachers' Salaries: 






High 


56,700.20 




Junior High 


57,256.53 




Elementary 


113,452.56 




Amount Carried Forward 


$242,273.61 


$335,307.80 



76 



Amount Brought Forward 


$242,273.61 


$335,307.80 


Text Books and Supplies: 






High 


3,431.09 




Junior High 


2,946.85 




Elementary 


4,715.46 




Tuition, High 


871.40 




Transportation : 






High 


5,853.69 




Junior High 


4,009.20 




Elementary 


6,371.36 




Janitor Services: 






High 


8,861.83 




Junior High 


8,867.34 




Elementary 


8,867.64 




Fuel: 






High 


3,462.85 




Junior High 


3,380.69 




Elementary 


5,297.11 




Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds: 




High 


5,675.05 




Junior High and Elementary 


10,462.15 




Health : 






High 


1,734.15 




Junior High 


1,599.50 




Elementary 


2,933.35 




Lawrence Gas and Electric Co. : 






High 


1,292.66 




Junior High 


1,204.07 




Elementary 


1,120.49 




Total Expenditures 


$335,231.54 




Balance to Revenue 


76.26 





$335,307.80 $335,307.80 



77 



ARTICLE 24— VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

Cr. 

Appropriation $980.00 

« 

Dr. 

Teachers' Salaries 
Miscellaneous Expenses 

Total Expenditures 
Balance to 1951 

$980.00 $980.00 



ARTICLE 25— MILITARY LEAVE OF ABSENCE 
MEMBERS OF TEACHERS' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 



$878 


.26 


100 


.90 


$979 


.16 




,84 



Appropriation 

Teachers' Retirement Board 



Cr. 
Dr. 


$1,585.00 


$1,585.00 




$1,585.00 


$1,585.00 



ARTICLE 26— PRELIMINARY PLANS 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BUILDINGS 

Cr. 

Appropriation $10,000 . 00 

Dr. 

Engineering and Architectural Services $6,822 . 00 
Building Committee. Reports 326 . 61 

Miscellaneous Expenses 57 . 60 



Total Expenditures $ 7,206.21 

Balance to 1951 2,793.79 



$10,000.00 $10,000.00 

78 



Labor 



ARTICLE 30— SHAWSHEEN SCHOOL YARD 




Cr. 




ce from 1949 


Dr. 


$758.07 
$ 85.97 


Grading and Trucking 




205.42 


Total Expenditures 


$291.39 


Balance to 1951 




466.68 



$758.07 



$758.07 



SMITH— HUGHES— GEORGE— BARDEN FUND 

Cr. 



Balance from 1949 
From State 

Salaries, Teachers 



Dr. 



$28.74 
$28.74 



$ 1.52 
27.22 



$28.74 



Receipts in 1950 
Petty Cash Refund 



SCHOOL LUNCH 
Cr. 



Salary, Supervisor 

Labor 

Groceries and Provisions 

Maintenance of Kitchen 

Miscellaneous Expenses 

Total Expenditures 
Balance to 1951 



Dr. 





$12,913 


.19 




10 


00 


$ 1,056.00 






2,768.26 






5,716.22 






406.06 






74.42 






$10,020.96 




2,902.23 






$12,923.19 


$12,923. 


19 



79 



PUNCHARD ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



Cr. 



Receipts in 1950 



Dr. 

Johnson High Athletic Association 
Services, Officials at Games 
Miscellaneous Expenses 

Total Expenditures 
Balance to 1951 



$ 23.44 
72.00 
41.29 


$1,098.05 


$ 136.73 
961.32 




$1,098.05 


$1,098.05 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 



Cr. 



Appropriation 






$28,334.78 


Dog Account Refund 






2,191.83 


Income from Investments 


Dr. 




2,750.00 


Salaries, Librarian 




$ 3,766.00 




Assistants 




12,974.66 




Janitors 




2,816.00 




Treasurer 




100.00 




Books and Periodicals 




6,603.59 




Bindings 




834.40 




Fuel and Light 




1,542.91 




Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds 2,392 . 12 




Office Maintenance 




2,045.46 




Miscellaneous Expenses 




188.72 




Total Expenditures 


$33,263.86 




Balance to Revenue 




12.75 






$33,276.61 


$33,276.61 



80 



ARTICLE 28— MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 
CONVERTING BOILER TO OIL 

Cr. 

Appropriation $775 . 00 

Dr. 
Purchase New Boiler $775 . 00 



$775.00 $775.00 

ADMINISTRATION AND OFFICE— BOARD OF PUBLIC 

WORKS 

Cr. 



Appropriation 






$16,750.00 


Petty Cash Refund 


Dr. 




50.00 


Salary, Superintendent 




$ 4,888.00 




Engineer 




4,405.00 




Clerks 




6,602.00 




Office Maintenance 




852.68 





Total Expenditures $16,747 . 68 

Balance to Revenue 52.32 





$16,800.00 


$16,800.00 


PARK DEPARTMENT 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$6,200.00 


Dr. 






Labor 


$5,075.95 




Rental and Maintenance of Grounds 


538.90 




Equipment and Repairs 


544.36 




Total Expenditures 


$6,159.21 




Balance to Revenue 


40.79 





$6,200.00 $6,200.00 

81 



ARTICLE 27— EUGENE V. LOVELY PENSION 

Cr. 

Appropriation 

Dr. 
Pension, Eugene V. Lovely 
Balance to 1951 





$2,375.00 


$1,863.58 
511.42 




$2,375.00 


$2,375.00 



ARTICLE 30— IMPROVE AND RESURFACE 
BALLARDVALE PLAYGROUND 

Cr. 



Appropriation 


Dr. 




$2,350.00 


Labor 




$ 370.66 




Paving Skating Rink 




1,740.00 




Gravel 




42.59 




Total Expenditures 


$2,153.25 




Balance to 1951 




196.75 






$2,350.00 


$2,350.00 


RECREATION 






Cr. 






Appropriation 


Dr. 




$9,600.00 


Playgrounds : 








Salaries, Instructors 




$ 3,307.00 




Police, Matron and Other 






Employees at Dances 




302 . 00 




Labor 




157.73 




Repairs 




332.58 




Recreational Supplies 




1,291.30 




Amount Carried Forward 


$ 5,390.61 


$ 9,600.00 



82 



Amount Brought Forward 


$5,390.61 


$9,600.00 


Pomps Pond: 






Salaries, Lifeguards 


2,555.85 




Equipment and Repairs 


677.16 




Truck, Bulldozer Hire 


119.00 




Miscellaneous Expenses 


83.91 




Skating : 






Scraping and Flooding 


358.29 




Plowing 


37.00 




Installation of Lights and Lighting 283.62 




Total Expenditures 


$9,505.44 




Balance to Revenue 


94.56 






$9,600.00 


$9,600.00 



DAMAGES TO PERSONS AND PROPERTY 
Cr. 

Appropriation S500 . 00 

Dr. 
Damages to Persons and Property $ 95 . 79 

Balance to Revenue 404.21 



$500.00 $500.00 

AMERICAN LEGION QUARTERS 
Cr. 

Appropriation $600 . 00 

Dr. 

Rent for Quarters $600 . 00 



$600.00 $600.00 

VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS QUARTERS 

Cr. 

Appropriation $600 . 00 

Dr. 
Rent for Quarters $600 . 00 



$600.00 S600.00 

83 



DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS POST 18 QUARTERS 

Cr. 



Appropriation 


Dr. 




$480.00 


Rent for Quarters 




$480.00 






$480.00 


$480.00 




INSURANCE 






Cr. 






Appropriation 


Dr. 




$18,000.00 


Insurance 




$17,998.49 




Balance to Revenue 




1.51 






$18,000.00 


$18,000.00 




ARMISTICE DAY 






Cr. 






Appropriation 


Dr. 


• 


$150.00 


Wreaths and Bugler 




$21.00 




Renting and Showing 


of Films 

ditures 
Levenue 


94.20 




Total Expen 
Balance to E 


$115.20 
34.80 






$150.00 


S150.00 




MEMORIAL DAY 






Cr. 






Appropriation 


Dr. 




$1,250.00 


Bands and Sound Service 


$270.00 




Flowers and Wreaths 




532.90 




Flags, Markers and Cartridges 
Transportation and Lunches 


191.45 
165.20 





Total Expenditures $1,159.55 

Balance to Revenue 90 . 45 



$1,250.00 $1,250.00 



84 



TOWN REPORTS 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$1,288.50 


Dr. 






Printing Town Reports 


$1,288.50 






$1,288.50 


$1,288.50 


TOWN SCALES 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$200.00 


Transferred from Reserve Fund 




400.00 


Dr. 






Salary, Public Weigher 


$100.00 




Repairs to Scales 


398.00 




Total Expenditures 


$498.00 




Balance to Reserve Fund 


102.00 






$600.00 


$600.00 


ARTICLE 42— PRINTING THE TOWN BY-LAWS 


Cr. 






Appropriation 




$350.00 


Dr. 






Printing the Town By-Laws 


$240.25 




Posting of Town By-Laws 


7.15 




Total Expenditures 


$247.40 




Balance to 1951 


102.60 






$350.00 


$350.00 


WATER DEPARTMENT 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$49,450.00 



85 



Amount Brought Forward $49,450.00 

Dr. 

Office Maintenance $ 575.05 

Labor 16,538.65 
Lawrence Gas and Electric Company 8,298.70 

Pipe, Meters and Fittings 5,621 .48 

Equipment, Hardware and Tools 1,053.97 

Chlorine, Lime, Etc. 983.75 

Miscellaneous Expenses 22.00 

Maintenance of Pumping Station 16,323.79 



Total Expenditures $49,417 . 39 

Balance to Revenue 32.61 



$49,450.00 $49,450.00 

ARTICLE 1— SUPPLEMENTARY WARRANT— ENGINE 
DRIVEN CENTRIFUGAL PUMP 





Cr. 






Appropriation 


Dr. 




$15,000.00 


Centrifugal Pump 




$ 67,5 . 00 




Miscellaneous Expenses 




22.75 




Total Expenditures 


$ 697.75 




Balance to 1951 




14,302.25 






$15,000.00 


$15,000.00 



ARTICLE 5 -EXTENDING WATER SYSTEM 

Cr. 



Balance from 1949 

Labor 

Pipe and Hydrants 

Miscellaneous Expenses 



Dr. 



$ 319.36 

944.59 

19.10 


$1,283.05 


$1,283.05 


$1,283.05 



86 



ARTICLE 18— WATER DEPARTMENT IMPROVEMENTS 

Gr. 



Appropriation 


Dr. 




$34,500.00 


Labor 




$ 757.78 




Lining Pipe 




17,919.39 




Tat Patch, Etc. 




205.20 




Miscellaneous Expenses 




115.89 




Total Expenditures 


$18,998.26 




Balance to 1951 




15,501.74 






$34,500.00 


$34,500.00 


ARTICLE 21— EXTENDING AND IMPROVING WATER 


SYSTEM 






Cr. 






Appropriation 


Dr. 




$20,000.00 


Labor 




$ 3,010.08 




Pipe, Hydrants, Etc. 




8,525.84 




Tractor Shovel 




1,186.19 




Blasting 




282.93 




Miscellaneous Expenses 




60.53 




Total Expenditures 


$13,065.57 




Balance to 1951 




6,934.43 






$20,000.00 


$20,000.00 


ARTICLE 24— PUMPING EQUIPMENT— BANCROFT RD. 




Cr. 






Balance from 1949 


Dr. 




$6,080.13 


New Pumping Equipment 




$ 437.40 




Pump Control Metameter Receiver 


281.17 




Postage 




.48 




Total Expenditures 


$ 719.05 




Balance to 1951 




5,361.08 






$6,080.13 


$6,080.13 



87 



ARTICLE 33— WATER— RED SPRING ROAD 

Gr. 



Balance from 1949 

Labor 

Pipe 

Tarvia 



Dr. 



279.71 
448.91 

278.83 



$2,185.42 



Total Expenditures $1 ,007 . 45 

Transferred to Surplus Revenue 985 . 42 

Balance to 1951 192.55 



,185.42 



$2,185.42 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 
Cr. 



Balance from 1949 

Appropriation 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Interest 

Petty Cash Refund 

Refunds 

Dr. 



Salary, Superintendent 


$ 2,718.00 


Clerk 


200.00 


Labor 


10,562.55 


Office Maintenance 


133.86 


Equipment, Tools and Truck Maint. 


1,301.60 


Containers 


535.50 


Paving Avenue 


700.00 


Seed, Loam and Gravel 


365.08 



Total Expenditures $16,516. 59 

Transferred to Surplus Revenue 2,143.95 
Balance to 1951 2,245.04 

Balance to Revenue .67 



$ 2,143.95 

16,500.00 

2,245.04 

10.00 

7.26 



$20,906.25 $20,906.25 



88 



Appropriation 
Interest 



INTEREST 
Cr. 

Dr. 



$2,646.25 



$2,646.25 



$2,646.25 



$2,646.25 



Appropriation 
General Loans 



MATURING DEBT 
Cr. 



Dr. 



Town Clerk's Dog License Money 
Cemetery Perpetual Cares 
Private Trust Funds 
Retirement Fund 
Essex County Tax 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Withholding Taxes 
Savings Bonds 
Blue Cross 
Refunds 

Total Expenditures, 1950 



$39,000.00 



$39,000.00 



$39,000.00 $39,000.00 

$2,775.80 
3,712.03 
3,257.39 

21,653.00 

53,470.70 
3,656.47 

53,767.50 
4,312.50 
5,301.98 
4,344.05 



$1,326,627.28 



RESERVE FUND 
Cr. 



Transferred from Overlay Surplus 
Transfer Balances 



Amount Carried Forward 



89 



815,000. 00 
638.92 

815.638.92 



Amount Brought Forward 


Dr. 






$15,638.92 


Civilian Defense 






$ 1,500.00 




Election and Registration 






1,500.00 




Forest Fires 






2,343.30 




Health Department 






1,000.00 




Veterans' Service 






1,500.00 




Town Scales 






400.00 




Balance to Overlay Surplus 






7,395.62 






$15,638.92 


$15,638.92 


TAXES 


1940 TO 1947 




Tax Titles Disclaimed 






$110.49 




Tax Titles Taken 








$110.49 




$110.49 


$110.49 


TAXES 


1948 






Balance from 1949 






$946.37 




Tax Titles Disclaimed 






28.90 




Collected in 1950 








$859.32 


Abated 








84.50 


Tax Titles 








31.45 




$974.27 


$974.27 


TAXES 


1949 






Balance from 1949 






$38,018.96 




Refunds 






72.00 




Tax Titles Disclaimed 






30.60 




Collected in 1950 








$34,210.69 


Abated 








1,267.66 


Tax Titles 








120.60 


Balance to 1951 








2,522.61 




$38,121.56 


$38,121.56 



90 



TAXES 1950 

Commitments $741,471.04 

Refunds 1,178.30 

Collected in 1950 $691,600. 13 

Abated 6,809.55 

Tax Titles 197.10 

Balance to 1951 44,042.56 



$742,649.34 $742,649.34 

ESTATE OF DECEASED PERSONS 

Commitments $432 . 73 

Collected in 1950 $432.73 



$432.73 $432.73 

CLASSIFIED FOREST LAND 

Commitment $4.68 

Collected in 1950 $4.68 



$4.68 $4.68 

MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE TAXES 1949 

Balance from 1949 $3,951 . 33 

Commitments in 1950 617.53 

Refunds 74.52 

Collected in 1950 $3,970.45 

Abated 623.93 

Balance to 1951 49.00 



$4,643.38 $4,643.38 

MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE TAXES 1950 

Commitments $104,962.66 

Refunds 2,110.74 

Collected in 1950 S91.339.62 

Abated 10,238.91 

Balance to 1951 5,494.87 



8107,073.40 $107,073.40 

91 



MOTH ASSESSMENTS 1948 

Balance from 1949 $2.72 

Collected in 1950 $2.72 



$2.72 


$2.72 


MOTH ASSESSMENTS 1949 




Balance from 1949 $61.01 




Collected in 1950 


$58.43 


Abated 


2.58 



$61.01 $61.01 



APPORTION SEWER ASSESSMENTS PAID IN ADVANCE 

Commitments $1,161 . 20 

Collected in 1950 $1,161.20 



$1,161.20 $1,161.20 



UNAPPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1949 

Balance from 1949 $338 . 30 

Abated $338.30 



$338.30 $338.30 

UNAPPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1950 



Commitments 


$8,577.12 




Unapportioned Sewer Assessments 






Added to Taxes 1948 


368.67 




Collected in 1950 




$4,801.93 


Apportioned Sewer Added to Taxes 




1,989.73 


Special Assessment Revenue 




368.67 


Balance to 1951 




1,785.46 



$8,945.79 $8,945.79 
92 



UNAPPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS ADDED TO 

TAXES 1948 



Balance from 1949 


$11,428.97 




Commitment, 1950 


109.96 




Refund 


40.63 




Collected in 1950 




$ 1,158.55 


Unapportioned Sewer Assessments 195C 


1 


368.67 


Abated 




728.47 


Balance to 1951 




9,323.87 



$11,579.56 $11,579.56 



UNAPPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS ADDED TO 

TAXES 1949 

Balance from 1949 $15,793 .51 

Commitment, 1950 595 . 01 

Refund 382 . 08 

Collected in 1950 $ 1,061.19 

Apportioned Sewer Assessments Added 

to Taxes 497.50 

Abated 3,527.67 

Balance to 1951 11,684.24 



$16,770.60 $16,770.60 



APPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS ADDED TO 
TAXES 1949 

Balance from 1949 $135 . 87 

Committed Interest Unapportioned 

Sewer Assessmen ts 1 949 4.21 

Collected in 1950 X 94.75 

Abated 4.21 

Balance to 1951 41.12 



$140.08 $140.08 

93 



APPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS ADDED TO 
TAXES 1950 

Commitment, 1950 $989.25 

Collected in 1950 S939.36 

Abated 15.92 

Balance to 1951 33.97 



S989.25 S S989.25 

COMMITTED INTEREST ON SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1948 

Balance from 1949 $204.57 

Commitment, 1950 3.01 

Refund 132.55 

Collected in 1950 

Special Assessment Revenue 

Abated 



$ 4 


.03 


3 


.01 


333 


.09 



$340.13 $340.13 

COMMITTED INTEREST ON SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1949 



Balance from 1949 $347 . 37 




Refund 158.40 




Collected in 1950 


$ 29.64 


Apportioned Sewer 


7.31 


Apportioned Sewer Assessments Added to Taxes 1949 


4.21 


Abated 


449.99 


Balance to 1951 


14.62 



$505.77 $505.77 

COMMITTED INTEREST ON SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1950 

Commitment, 1950 S213.77 

Estimated Receipts 

Refunds 

Collected in 1950 

Abated 

Balance to 1951 

$312.07 $312.07 

94 



1.22 




97.08 






$211.94 




97.08 




3.05 



TAX TITLE ACCOUNT 

Balance from 1949 $ 469.49 

Tax Titles Taken 380.01 

Added to Tax Titles 199 . 1 1 

Tax Titles Disclaimed $ 231 . 45 

Balance to 1951 817.16 



$1,048.61 $1,048.61 

TAX TITLE POSSESSIONS 

Balance from 1949 $841 . 42 

Balance to 1951 $841.42 



$841.42 $841.42 

DEPARTMENTAL ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Balance from 1949 $13,052 . 95 

Charges, Accounts Receivable in 1950 63,542.34 

Collected in 1950 $66,620.08 

Abated 396.52 

Adjustment 21.77 

Balance to 1951 9,556.92 



$76,595.29 $76,595.29 

STATE AND COUNTY AID TO HIGHWAYS ACCOUNTS 

RECEIVABLE 

Balance from 1949 $1,000.00 

Charges to State and County 13,000 . 00 

Collected in 1950 $11,993.51 

State and County Aid to Highways Revenue 1,006.49 

Balance to 1951 1,000.00 



$14,000.00 $14,000.00 

WATER RATES ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Balance from 1949 $12,711.42 

Charges, Commitments, 1950 69,921 .07 



Amount Carried Forward $82,632.49 

95 



Amount Brought Forward 


$82,632.49 




Collected in 1950 




s $67,442.43 


Water Liens Added to Taxes 




1,159.73 


Abated 




19.54 


Adjustment 




.80 


Balance to 1951 




14,009.99 



$82,632.49 $82,632.49 

WATER SERVICES AND MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS 

RECEIVABLE 



Balance from 1949 


$237.39 




Charges, Commitments, 1950 


708.93 




Collected in 1950 




$720.68 


Balance to 1951 




225.64 



$946.32 $946.32 

WATER LIENS ADDED TO TAXES 1948 

Balance from 1949 $3.49 

Collected in 1950 $3.49 



$3.49 $3.49 

WATER LIENS ADDED TO TAXES 1949 

Balance from 1949 $1,420.65 

Collected in 1950 $ 480.14 

Balance to 1951 940.51 



$1,420.65 $1,420.65 

WATER LIENS ADDED TO TAXES 1950 

Commitment, 1950 $1,159.73 

Collected in 1950 $ 421.48 

Balance to 1951 738.25 



$1,159.73 $1,159.73 
96 



OVERLAY SURPLUS 

Balance from 1949 

Overlays 1948-1949 

Reserve Fund — Unexpended Balance 

Transferred to Reserve Fund $15,000.00 

Balance to 1951 24,922.63 



$25,197.26 
7,329.75 
7,395.62 





$39,922.63 


$39,922.63 




OVERLAY 1948 




Balance from 1949 




$946.37 


Abatements 


$ 84.50 




Overlay Surplus 


861.87 





$946.37 



$946.37 



OVERLAY 1949 



Balance from 1949 






$10,258.15 


Abatements 


$ 1,267. 


66 




Overlay Surplus 


6,467. 


88 




Balance to 1951 


2,522. 


61 






$10,258, 


.15 


$10,258.15 


OVERLAY 1950 






Overlay 1950 






$22,913.76 


Abatements 


$ 6,809.55 




Balance to 1951 


16,104 


.21 






$22,913 


.76 


$22,913.76 


SURPLUS REVENUE 






Balance from 1949 






$429,200.19 


State and County Aid to Highways Revenue 




11,993.51 


Unexpended Appropriation Balances 






17,744.50 


Tailings Old Checks 






13.62 


Refunds 1949 






8.16 


Estates of Deceased Persons 






432.73 


Public Welfare Reimbursements 






1,749.34 


Aid to Dependent Children Recovery 






412.00 


Amount Carried Forward 


$461,554.05 



97 



Amount Brought Forward 






$461,554.05 


Tax Titles 






169.99 


Revenue 1950 






57,541.27 


Article 9 — Improvement Main 


Street 


$ 12,000.00 




Transfer to Revenue 




65,000.00 




Article 1 — School Construction 




275,000.00 




Tax Titles 




459.64 




Special Assessment Revenue 




600.36 




Refunds 




11.85 




Balance to 1951 




166,193.46 





$519,265.31 $519,265.31 



JOHN CORNELL WOOD AND COAL FUND 

Principal Fund 

Andover Savings Bank, Book 13259 Andover 

Essex Savings Bank, Book 82865 Lawrence 

Broadway Savings Bank, Book 13403 Lawrence 
City Institution for Savings, Book 69782 Lowell 
The Central Savings Bank, Book 21760 Lowell 



Receipts 
Balance on hand January 1st, 1950 
Interest received during 1950 



Expenditures 
March 11, 1950, Cross Coal Co. $23.75 
March 24, 1950, Cross Coal Co. 23.75 
December 8, 1950, Cross Coal Co. 25.25 
December 28, 1950, Cross Coal Co. 25.25 



S98.00 less 



Balance on hand January 1st, 1951 

Respectfully submitted, 
Edward P. 



$1,000.00 


1,000 


.00 


1,000 


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1,000. 


00 


1,000. 


00 


$5,000. 


00 


$665.87 


100. 


00 



$765.87 



98.00 



$667.87 



Hall, Chairman 
Fred E. Cheever, Treasurer 
Arthur W. Cole 



98 



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100 



Report of the 
Trustees of Punchard Free School 

Year Ending December 31, 1950 



January 1, 1950 

Cash in Banks $12,944.38 

Real Estate Mortgages 31,035.70 

Bonds at Book Value 33,019 . 92 



$77,000.00 



December 31, 1950 

Cash in Banks $19,985 . 86 

Real Estate Mortgages 23,994 . 22 

Bonds at Book Value 33,019 . 92 



$77,000.00 



INCOME ACCOUNT 



Jan. 1, 1950 Cash on Hand 


$6,542.41 




Interest and Dividends Rec'd 


2,698.73 


$9,241.14 






Expenditures 






Safe Deposit Box 


$ 12.00 




Treasurer's Bond 


25.00 




E. E. Hammond — Salary 


200 . 00 




Expenditures for Punchard Library 






and Incidentals 


1,425.59 




December 31, 1950 — Cash on Hand 


7,578.55 









$9,241.14 



GOLDSMITH FUND 

Jan. 1, 1950 Cash in Savings Bank $328.73 

Interest Received 6.60 



Dec. 31, 1950 Cash in Savings Hank $ 335.33 

101 



DRAPER FUND 

Jan. 1, 1950 Cash in Savings Bank $1,506.72 

Interest Received 29 . 97 



Scholarship Awarded 

Dec. 31, 1950 Cash in Savings Bank 

BARNARD Fltt 

Jan. 1, 1950 Cash in Savings Bank 
Dividends Received 
Interest Received 

Prizes Awarded 
Dec. 31, 1950 Cash in Savings Bank $28.73 

CHAPIN FUND 

Jan. 1, 1950 Cash in Savings Bank $2,228.20 

Interest Received 44.38 



1,536. 


69 




30 


00 








$1,506.69 


$28.57 




40 


.00 
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68 


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40 


.00 





2,272.58 
Scholarship Awarded 40 . 00 



Dec. 31, 1950 Cash in Savings Bank $2,232.58 

RESERVE FUND 

Jan. 1, 1950 Cash in Savings Bank $3,662.51 

Interest Received • 73.61 



Dec. 31, 1950 Cash in Savings Bank $3,736. 12 

HENRY WARREN BARNARD AND MABEL PARADISE 
BARNARD FUND 

Jan. 1, 1950 Cash in Savings Bank $1,083.20 

Interest Received 21.77 



Dec. 31, 1950 Cash in Savings Bank $1,104.97 

102 



ELIZABETH T. GUTTERSON SCHOLARSHIP 

Jan. 1, 1950 Cash in Savings Bank $1,026.01 

Interest Received 20.42 



1,046.43 
Scholarship Awarded 20 . 00 



Dec. 31, 1950 Cash in Savings Bank $1,026.43 



M. E. GUTTERSON BOTANY PRIZES 



$308.97 
6.15 


315, 

5, 


12 
00 



Jan. 1, 1950 Cash in Savings Bank 
Interest Received 



Prizes Awarded 

Dec. 31, 1950 Cash in Savings Bank $310. 12 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edmond E. Hammond 

Treasurer 

This is to certify that the securities belonging to the Trustees of 
Punchard Free School and the income accruing therefrom have 
been checked and found to be correct. 

The remaining items in the above account are examined by the 
Town Accountant. 

C. C. Kimball 
Roy E. Hardy 



103 



Report of 
Trustees of Memorial Hall Library 



Cash January 1, 1950 $ 458.47 

Income from Investments 2,381.00 

Income from Savings Bank Accounts 168.52 
Income from Contributions or Additions 

to Principal 334.51 

Total Cash and Income 

Paid Town of Andover 
Safe Deposit Box Rental 
Petty Cash (Revolving Fund) 
Postage, Insurance, on Securities 

Total Disbursements $2,782 . 00 

Balance, December 31, 1950 $ 560.50 

Arthur W. Reynolds 

Treasurer 



83,342.50 

$2,750.00 

15.00 

15.00 

2.00 



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110 



Town Debt 

DETAIL OF PAYMENT BY YEARS 







Junior High 






Sewer 


School' 




Year 


Rate 4^% 


2 & 2M% 


Total 


1951 


$ 5,000. 


$19,000. 


$24,000. 


1952 


5,000. 


19,000. 


24,000. 


1953 


5,000. 


19,000. 


24,000. 


1954 




4,000. 


4,000. 


1955 




4,000. 


4,000. 



$15,000. $65,000. $80,000 

Authorized but not issued for School Buildings $800,000. 



Ill 



Board of Retirement Report 



To the Board of Selectmen, 
Andover, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

The Town of Andover Board of Retirement herewith submits 
the following report for the year 1950: 



Balance, January 1, 1950 




$1,068.40 


Receipts, January 1 — December 31, 1950: 




Deductions, Group I and II 


$17,258.72 




Interest on Bonds and Stocks 


5,400.00 




Appropriation 


21,653.00 


$45,380.12 






Expenditures: 






Pensions paid, Group I and II 


$21,142.96 




Investments 


19,473.73 




Refunds, Deductions and Interest 


346.66 




Office Expenses 


1,052.35 


$42,015.70 






Balance, December 31, 1950 




$3,364.42 


The Total Active Members : 






January 1, 1950 




122 


December 31, 1950 




126 



January 1, 1950 December 31, 1950 

Active Members 122 126 

Pensioners 24 24 

Total Membership— December 31, 1950 150 

During the year $19,000 worth of Bonds were purchased. 
The Securities held at the close of the year cost $192,153.57. 
$22,134.00 is the amount recommended to be added to the fund 
by Town appropriation for 1951. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George C. Napier, Chairman 
David L. Nicoll, Secretary 
Edmond E. Hammond 

Board of Retirement 

112 



Treasurer's Report 



Receipts and payments for the year were as follows : 

Balance, January 1, 1950 $ 475,214.58 

Receipts 1,384,905.95 



$1,860,120.53 

Payments 1,326,627.28 



Balance, December 31, 1950 $ 533,493.25 

Disbursements were in accordance with 113 selectmen's war- 
rants, 16,300 checks having been issued. The increase of more 
than 1000 was due partly to its being a state election year and 
partly to two new functions of the office, prescribed by law: 
handling the receipts and expenditures of the School Lunch Pro- 
gram and, late in the year, of the Punchard Athletic Association 
funds. Included in the totals is $53,767.50, withheld from the pay 
of 295 full- and part-time employees for federal taxes. Pay deduc- 
tions for the purchase of U.S. Savings Bonds amounted to 
$4,401.73 and $5,585.93 for the dues of the Blue Cross and Shield. 

Reference to other pages of the report will show the amount of 
cemetery perpetual care and other trust funds and of the Retire- 
ment Board's funds, in the treasurer's custody. The number 
of pensioners at the end of the year was the same as at the be- 
ginning — 24, and the average monthly pension about $75. 

Tax titles number 18 and amount to $846.70. 

Parking meter receipts were $10,362.78— about $200. less 
than last year due to the re-surfacing of Main Street. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Tiiaxter Eaton, Treasurer 



113 



Report of Tax Collector 





POLL TAXES 




Year 


Collected 


Abated 


Outstanding 




1950 


in 1950 


Jan. 1, 1951 


1949 


$ 10.00 


$ 18.00 




1950 


7054.00 


*1170.00 


$ 18.00 


* 


Abatements to men over 65 years- 


-$974.00 






PERSONAL TAXES 




Year 


Collected 


Abated 


Outstanding 




1950 


in 1950 


Jan. 1, 1951 


1948 


$ " 402.58 


$ 84.50 




1949 


3,430.69 


36.00 


$ 676.01 


1950 


93,175.88 


268.20 


5,585.22 




REAL ESTATE TAXES 




Year 


Collected 


Abated 


Outstanding 




1950 


in 1950 


Jan. 1, 1951 


1948 


$ 456.74 






1949 


30,770.00 


$ 1,213.66 


$1,846.60 


1950 


591,370.25 


5,371.35 


38,439.34 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES 

Year Collected Abated Outstanding 

1950 in 1950 Jan. 1, 1951 

1949 $ 3,970.45 $ 623.93 $ 49.00 

1950 91,339.62 10,238.91 5,494.87 

MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTIONS 

Estate of Deceased Persons $ 432 . 73 

Water Liens 905 . 1 1 

Moth Assessments 61.15 

Sewer Assessments (apportioned) Paid in Advance 1,161.20 

Sewer Assessments (apportioned) 1,034.11 

Sewer Assessments (unapportioned) 7,021.67 

Committed Interest on Sewer Assessments 244 . 39 

Classified Forest Land Tax 4 . 68 

Interest on Delinquent Taxes 1,333.73 

114 



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115 



Assessors' Report 



We herewith submit our annual report :- 

Number of polls assessed 4,095 
Number of persons assessed 3,579 
(real and personal) 



Valuation— personal property $ 


: 2, 


,747,314.00 


Valuation — real estate 


17,608,085.00 






<ft90 3^ 3QQ OH 






«p/u,ooo,oyy . uu 


Tax on polls $ 




8,190.00 


Tax on personal property 




98,903.30 


Tax on real estate 




633,891.06 

74.0 QQA 7A 






i L t\j,yo'-k . oo 


Apportioned sewer 




989.25 


Committed interest 




213.77 


Water liens added to taxes 




1,159.73 


Abatements : — 






Poll taxes 




1,188.00 


Personal property 




388.70 


Real estate 




6,585.01 


Rate of taxation per $1,000.— $36.00 




Number of assessed 






Horses 




60 


Cows 




407 


Yearlings, bulls, and heifers 




101 


Swine 




341 


Fowl 




43,597 


Sheep 




95 


All other 




595 


Number of acres land assessed 




16,822 + 


Dwellings assessed 




3,076 



Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 
Number of vehicles assessed, 5,936 
Assessed valuation $3,057,750.00 

Excise 105,580.19 

Abatements 10,862.84 

Rate — $44.16 per thousand 

116 



Additional Assessments 
Number of polls assessed 25 
Number of persons assessed, real and personal 55 
Valuation — personal property $2,500.00 

Valuation — real estate 9,760.00 

Tax on polls 50 . 00 

Tax on personal property 90 . 00 

Tax on real estate 351 . 36 

Number of acres assessed 43.53 + 



Respectfully submitted, 

Roy E. Hardy, Chairman 
J. Everett Collins 
Sidney P. White 



Municipal Properties and Public Improvements 





Land and 


Equip, and 


Total 




Buildings 


other property 




Town Hall 


$ 115,900 


$ 15,150 


$ 131,050 


Shaw Property 


12,000 




12,000 


Fire Department 


92,175 


48,000 


140,175 


Police Department 


600 


2,700 


3,300 


Schools 


1,939,750 


52,000 


1,991,750 


Library 


212,000 


40,000 


252,000 


Water Department 


117,750 


1,231,892 


1,349,642 


Sewer Department 


2,600 


628,310 


630,910 


Highway Department 


26,200 


70,200 


96,400 


Parks and Playgrounds 


62,175 


6,200 


68,375 


Tree Warden and Moth Departments 




9,200 


9,200 


Infirmary 


80,300 


2,500 


82,800 


Spring Grove Cemetery 


36,350 


1,125 


37,475 


Weights and Measures 




350 


350 


Town Scales 




500 


500 


Old Schoolhouse, Ballardvale 


26,500 




26,500 


Punchard School Fund 




83,522 


83,522 


Memorial Hall Investment Funds 




92,952 


92,952 


Burnham Road — Land 


2,500 




2,500 


Pomps Pond Bathing Beach 


7,050 


300 


7,350 


Indian Ridge — Land 


1,000 




1,000 


Woodland — West District 


275 




275 


Public Dump Site 


6,000 




6,000 


Tax Title Possessions 


3,075 




3,075 


Carmel Woods — Land 


12,300 




12,300 


Main and Dwight Sts. — Land 


5,000 




5,000 


Totals 


$2,761,500 


$2,284,901 


$5,046,401 



117 



Board of Public Welfare 



The Board of Public Welfare submits the following report for 
the year 1950. 

During the year 1950, we added 36 cases to our Old Age 
Assistance rolls, and dropped 23 through death and other causes. 
We had 170 cases at the start of 1950, and closed the year with 
183 cases. 

The Legislature made only a few changes in welfare laws during 
1950, but at the biennial election held in November the voters 
accepted a referendum which could seriously undermine the 
financial setup of the state. Some of the high points of the law are 
to allow non-citizens Old Age Assistance, and to give people 63 
years old and up a minimum allowance of $75.00 a month. The 
state estimates an additional tax of fifty-four millions, if this bill 
goes through. Taking into consideration the cost of Civil De- 
fense, which will be very high, I do not see how Massachusetts 
can afford to increase Old Age Assistance above actual need. 
This bill will come before the Supreme Court of Massachusetts 
to test its validity before the time of enactment on June 1, 1951. 

The Federal Government has enacted legislation to assist in 
the care of permanently disabled persons of all ages throughout 
the country, which, if accepted by the Massachusetts Legislature, 
will compel us to set up a new form of aid. This will be called 
"Assistance to Persons Who Are Disabled." Until the Massachu- 
setts Legislature accepts this new form of aid and outlines the 
way it must be handled, it is difficult to tell what the cost will be. 

Our Aid to Dependent Children form of assistance has run 
about the same for the past few years. At the end of 1950, we 
were aiding twelve families, with a total of thirty children. To 
offset the increased cost of living, the Federal Government is 
bearing an increased share of the cost, which will keep our ex- 
penses at the same level. 

Public Welfare, a form of relief in which the expense is borne 
almost entirely by the town, takes care of people who are not 
eligible for Aid to Dependent Children or Old Age Assistance. 
Under this form of aid, we give assistance to families temporarily 
in need, neglected children, and persons in state institutions. 

118 



The cost of this form of aid has remained about the same for the 
past few years. 

At this time, we wish to thank all citizens and private organ- 
izations who have assisted our department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Roy E. Hardy, Chairman 
J. Everett Collins 
Sidney P. White 
Arthur W. Cole, Welfare Agent 



119 



Report of Trustees of Spring Grove 
Cemetery 



The Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery submit their annual 
report for the year 1950. 

There were fifty interments during the year, ten new lots were 
sold and eight old lots were put under perpetual care. 

The amount of perpetual care for lots sold was $3,021.75. The 
income from perpetual care funds for the year amounted to 
$2,230.04. Monies received from annual care, sale of lots, founda- 
tions, interments, etc., amounted to $2,494.31. 

Seven hundred and sixty-six feet of curbing was installed, some 
new and some replaced old curbing. 

Three hundred and eighty-two feet of permanent hard black 
top road was constructed on the east side of the cemetery. If said 
road could be carried through to the end of the east side and 
carried through the west side main road it would be both an 
economical and a needed improvement. 

Trees and shrubbery have been pruned and trimmed. Parts of 
some sections and other land have been reseeded. 

The land along the wall on Abbot Street has been cleared so 
that it can be clipped with the power mower. 

The cemetery needs a power lawn roller and the trustees hope 
same will be provided under an article in the warrant. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank R. Petty, Chairman 
Fred E. Cheever, Secretary 
Albert E. Curtis 
Malcolm E. Lundgren 
Clifford E. Marshall 



120 



Office of Veterans' Service 



The year 1950 has been a most eventful one for this office. A 
dream of four years was culminated when fifty-six World War II 
veterans and their families took up residence in the Andover 
Housing Project. We also saw the formation of a new group of 
veterans as many of our young men joined the armed forces in 
the current Korean conflict. All men, recalled, enlisting, or being 
inducted during this crisis will be eligible for the veteran benefits 
now enjoyed by veterans of World Wars I and II. Several veter- 
ans recalled to service have left behind wives and sometimes 
three or four children who must be cared for, financially, until the 
serviceman receives his first pay. The .usual waiting period for 
pay and allotments has been about two months. We face prob- 
lems vastly different from those in 1944 to 1946 and the social and 
domestic phases of our work have become quite complex since 
last August. 

Education — This year marks the beginning of the end of 
"G.I." education or training. A veteran must have initiated and 
be pursuing a course not later than July 25th, 1951, otherwise he 
will be ineligible for this benefit. All education must be completed 
by July, 1956, except in a few special cases. 

Employment — Calls for work were reduced over fifty percent 
from August to December 1st. This was due to war production 
and general stepup in business. In December the woolen industry 
started to lay off again and as the year ends we face new unem- 
ployment problems. 

Hospitalization, Medical and Dental Care— General medical, 
out-patient, and dental care pertaining to Veterans Administra- 
tion benefits are gradually showing a yearly increase. Hospital 
bills under the State laws have soared to new heights and this 
was one factor which necessitated our seeking additional funds to 
carry us through November and December. Hospital bills and 
medical cases will continue to increase year after year as the World 
War I veterans grow older and the families of the World War II 
veterans increase. This is a challenging problem and an expensh e 
one. Too many of our citizens who could cover their families with 
Blue Cross and Blue Shield, or some other similar agency, fail to 
do so and when adversity comes, they turn to society for as- 
sistance. 

121 



Veterans' Benefits — Ordinarily, Veterans' Benefits show a de- 
crease as employment increases. This year, however, the gains 
made in this field were wiped out by new State Legislation grant- 
ing War Allowance and Benefits to those recalled to service and 
who left dependents at home. While awaiting pay and family 
allotments, the Town and State assisted in all cases where there 
was need. This unforeseen obligation was the second factor which 
exhausted our budget. We can never estimate too accurately 
what demands will be made on this office, but we can state very 
accurately that each year will show a gradual increase. The men 
now serving our country in the Korean struggle will add to our 
future veteran responsibilities. 

Veteran Deaths — Veteran deaths during the year were: World 
War 1—2; World War II— 2; and the Korean conflict— 1. 
Paper Work Cases 
Compensation 29 

Dental Care 63 

Education 104 

Employment 103 

Hospitalization 114 

Housing 286 

Insurance 138 

Medical 106 

Pensions 102 

Photostats 182 

Training-on-job 27 

Veterans Benefits 163 

All Other Cases 772 



2,189 
We express our sincere thanks at this time for the cooperation 
received during the year from all local veteran organizations, the 
Red Cross, the Welfare Department, and all other benevolent 
and charitable groups. This cooperation is deeply appreciated. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Roy E. Hardy, Chairman, Board of Selectmen 
J. Everett Collins 
Sidney P. White 
Francis P. Markey, Director 
Office of Veterans' Services 

122 



Second Annual Report of the Andover 
Housing Authority 



For the year 1950, the Andover Housing Authority is happy to 
report the completion of the 56 homes for families of low-income 
veterans at the Morton Street site. Fifty-six (56) families of 
Andover veterans are now happily living in adequate homes, 
most of them for the first time since they came back from the 
service. 

The year 1950 was not all smooth sailing. The construction 
contract called for completion in the spring, but many delays 
were encountered. The contractor ran into both supervisory and 
financial difficulties, and final completion was not made until 
October although some tenants moved in on October 1. The con- 
tractor is still making minor adjustments, but as a whole, the 
construction has been completed in a satisfactory manner and 
these homes will be available for families of Andover veterans for 
many years to come. Special commendation is due to Mr. James 
Gordon, the Authority's supervisor of construction, who brought 
about a well-built job in spite of the difficulties encountered. 

The development is for families of Andover veterans of low 
income. For first admission, the families may not have an income 
in excess of $3,250.00 if there are two or fewer minor dependents 
and $3,500.00 if there are three or more minor dependents. 
The families now living in the development have a margin for 
increase in income before any action is taken by the Authority as 
to eviction or rent based entirely without subsidy. Rents will go 
up as income goes up. 

Each application received by the Authority was carefully 
checked both with the Veterans' Service Officer in Andover and 
with the employer. A special investigator experienced in social 
service work and home visits then visited each applicant at the 
place that applicant was then living. A complete report on each 
such visit was prepared for the Authority. Based upon all this 
data, the Authority made its final selection of the 56 families. 

The Authority has selected James E. Manning, an Andover 
veteran, to act as manager and maintenance man with an office 
at the development. He is collecting the rents and is taking care of 

123 



all maintenance problems. An office has been set up in the main- 
tenance quarters. The development is a low-rent development and 
each family is expected to maintain its own grounds and to keep 
its apartment in proper condition. Failure to do so on the part of 
the tenants will result in the work being done by the Authority, 
but charges for that work will be made against the family. This 
will encourage proper maintenance by the tenants so that the 
rents can be kept at a low level. At the same time, this policy will 
insure the type of maintenance the citizens of Andover would 
like to have. The members of the Andover Housing Authority 
wish to assure the people of Andover that the development will be 
well maintained so that it will be a credit to the Town. 

In closing, the Authority wishes to express a word of apprecia- 
tion to Mr. Francis Markey and to his assistant, Mrs. Hitchings, 
for their cooperation in providing an office for the Authority and 
in rendering many services to the Authority throughout the con- 
struction period. 

A complete financial statement as of December 31, 1950, is 
attached. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Douglas P. Crockett, Chairman 
Charles Hatch, Member 
Winthrop Newcomb, Treasurer 
Ernest W. Hall, Asst. Treasurer 
Stanley F. Swanton, Vice Chairman 

ADMINISTRATION FUND 
Trial Balance — December 31, 1950 



Administration Fund — Cash 


$4,450.54 






Security Deposit Fund-^Cash 


346.00 






Accounts Receivable 


29.50 






Tenants Security 




$ 346, 


00 


Prepaid Rents 




1. 


83 


Dwelling Rent Schedule 




7,926. 


74 


Management Salaries and Expenses 


86.27 






Operating Services 


942.54 






Utilities 


1,672.00 






Repairs, Maintenance, Replacements 


13.15 






General Expenses 


734.57 







Total $8,274.57 $8,274.57 

124 



DEVELOPMENT FUND 

Balance Sheet — December 31, 1950 

ASSETS 
Cash — Development Fund 

Andover National Bank $16,193 . 62 

Bay State Merchants National 20,478 . 40 



$36,672.02 

U. S. Treasury Bills 30,000.00 

Accounts Receivable— Mat's Stored 800 . 2 1 

Prepaid Utilities 85 . 86 

Development Cost 601,859.67 

Incompleted Cost 20,057 . 69 



$689,475.45 



LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL 

Acc't Payable— Contract Retentions $ 32,564.43 

Notes Authorized— Temporary 635,000 . 00 

Interest Accrued — Temporary Notes 1,774. 13 

Inearned Discount on Treasury Bills 79.20 

Contract Award — Benoit Constr. Co., Inc. 20,057.69 



$689,475.45 



125 



Board of Appeals Report 



To the Board of Selectmen: 

The Board of Appeals under the Zoning By-Law of the Town 
of Andover has the following members: James S. Eastham, Chair- 
man, term expiring May 1, 1952; Roy E. Hardy, Secretary, term 
expiring May 1, 1953; Edward P. Hall, term expiring May 1, 
1951; and two associate members, Leon A. Field and Walter C. 
Tomlinson, terms expiring May 1, 1951. 

During the year 1950, the fifteenth year of the Zoning By-Law, 
the Board heard and decided twenty-four cases as follows : 

Petition of Scott H. Black and Frederick S. Black, decided on 
April 12, 1950, for permission to enlarge the service station oper- 
ated by them on property owned by The Cyr Trust at 13 Union 
Street in said Andover. Granted 

Petition of John J. Fleming and Edward Fleming, decided on 
May 8, 1950, for permission to subdivide property owned by the 
said John J. Fleming on the northwest corner of Haverhill Street 
and Fleming Avenue in said Andover. Granted 

Petition of Marjorie Stearns, decided on May 8, 1950, for per- 
mission to convert a single family dwelling house owned by her at 
12 Locke Street in said Andover into a two-family or apartment 
house. Granted 

Petition of Gustave A. Schlott, decided on May 8, 1950, for per- 
mission to erect and maintain a gasoline and oil filling station on 
the property of Winfield Folley at 199 North Main Street in said 
Andover. Denied 

Petition of William A. Pitochelli and Marie Pitochelli, decided 
on May 8, 1950, for permission to erect and operate a roadside 
stand on property owned by them on the southwest corner of 
Wildwood Road and the By-Pass in said Andover. Granted 

Petition of Alfred L. Parizo and Eva B. Parizo, decided on 
June 19, 1950, for permission to convert the double house owned 
by them at 161-163 North Main Street in said Andover into an 
apartment house. Granted 

Petition of Irving G. Clark, decided on June 19, 1950, for 
permission to display and sell used cars on the property of Win- 
field C. Folley at 199 North Main Street in said Andover. Denied 

126 



Petition of Evelyn R. Marr, decided on July 27, 1950, for per- 
mission to convert a four-apartment house owned by her at 11 
Locke Street in said Andover, into a five-apartment house. Denied 

Petition of James A. Green, decided on July 31, 1950, for a 
variance from the Zoning By-Law with respect to the erection 
of a dwelling on a lot numbered 16 on plan No. 1241 recorded in 
the North District of Essex Registry of Deeds, on the south side 
of Appletree Lane in said Andover. Denied 

Petition of Joseph Hines and Yvonne Hines, decided on July 
31, 1950, for a variance from the Zoning By-Law with respect to 
the erection of a dwelling on a lot lettered A on a plan numbered 
17241 A in the Land Court, off the north side of County Road in 
said Andover. Denied 

Petition of James M. Gordon, decided on July 31, 1950, for 
permission to maintain a golf driving range on property owned by 
him and Ella M. Gordon on the east side of Lowell Street in said 
Andover. Denied 

Petition of Vincent A. Salvo, decided on July 31, 1950, for per- 
mission to erect a commercial building on property owned by 
him and Mary Salvo on South Main Street, north of the Howard 
Johnson restaurant at the By-Pass in said Andover. Denied 

Petition of Barbara K. Reynolds, decided on August 30, 1950, 
for permission to operate a tearoom on property to be purchased 
by the petitioner at 138 Elm Street in said Andover. Denied 

Petition of Peter DeAngelo and Nellie DeAngelo and Rosario 
Grasso and Paula Grasso, decided on August 30, 1950, for per- 
mission to convert a duplex house at 406-408 North Main Street 
in said Andover into a three-apartment house. Granted 

Petition of Phillip A. Costello and Dorcas Costello, decided on 
September 28, 1950, for permission to convert a two-family 
house at 13 Summer Street in said Andover into a three-apart- 
ment house. Granted 

Petition of Helen E. Hardy, decided on September 28, 1950, 
for permission to construct an addition to the house on property 
owned by her at 113 Chestnut Street in said Andover. Granted 

Petition of Paul DeTeresi, decided on October 18, 1950, for 
permission to erect a garage on property owned by him at 17 Red 
Spring Road in said Andover. Granted 

Petition of Harry R. Dockam and Laura C. Dockam, decided 
on October 18, 1950, for permission to construct and maintain a 

127 



dairy bar, gift shop, and gasoline station on property owned by 
them on the west side of the By-Pass in said Andover. Denied 

Petition of M. T. Stevens & Sons Company, decided on Octo- 
ber 18, 1950, for permission to subdivide the property owned by 
it on the east side of High Street in said Andover. Granted 

Petition of Francis P. Viera, decided on December 4, 1950, for 
a variance of the Zoning By-Law so that he may erect a garage 
2,400 square feet in area on the east side of Andover Street, at 
approximately 122 Andover Street. Denied 

Petition of Annie B. Swanton, decided on December 4, 1950, 
for permission to convert a two-family house at 23 Summer Street 
in said Andover into a three-apartment house. Granted 

Petition of George A. Noury and Lillian E. Noury, decided on 
December 4, 1950, for permission to convert a three-apartment 
house owned by them at 9 Chestnut Street in said Andover into 
a four-apartment house. Denied 

Petition of Eleanor E. Shaw, decided on December 4, 1950, for 
permission to erect a garage at the side of the house on property 
owned by her at 30 Foster Circle in said Andover. Granted 

Petition of Margaret H. Fairweather, decided on December 
26, 1950, for permission to subdivide the property owned by her 
on the north side of Summer Street in said Andover, there being 
two houses located on said property numbered 102 and 104 Sum- 
mer Street. Granted 

Respectfully submitted, 

James S. Eastham, Chairman 
Roy E. Hardy, Secretary 
Edward P. Hall 



128 



Report of Planning Board and Board 
of Survey 



The following Public Hearings were held by the Planning 
Board during the year 1950: 

January 13 — A proposed amendment to the Zoning By-Laws 
re-zoning a section of land near Fosters Pond from a residential to 
a business district was approved. Later, the petitioner, Willis P. 
Chick, withdrew his petition. 

February 3 — A proposed amendment to the Zoning By-Laws 
designating as a Business District, a section of land on the North- 
erly side of Essex Street adjacent to the Shawsheen River. The 
proposed change was approved. 

June 2 — Plan of land Northerly side of Central Street near 
Lupine Road, on petition of Alexander H. Henderson, for purpose 
of subdivision and opening for public use, a private way as shown 
thereon. This plan was approved and recommended for accept- 
ance. 

October 6 — A proposed amendment to the Zoning By-Laws, 
re-zoning to a private recreational district a certain parcel of land 
on the North side of Lowell Street at the junction of Bellevue 
Road was disapproved. 

October 27 — A proposed amendment to the Zoning By-Laws, 
re-zoning from a residential district to a business district, a parcel 
of land on the Easterly side of the junction of the Andover By- 
Pass and South Main Street was disapproved. 

November 24 — For approval of a plan of land located on the 
Easterly side of Stirling Street for purpose of subdivision only. 
The Board recommended that the petitioner, Edward Jones, 
present complete plans and petition for a hearing for street ac- 
ceptance. 

December 8 — For approval of a plan of land on an extension 
of Lincoln Circle for purpose of subdivision and opening a private 
way for public use. No action on the plan was taken. Petitioner 
Joseph Cussell was requested to bring before the Board a com- 
plete set of plans. 

December 15 — For approval of a plan of land on Central Street, 
near School Street on the former A. Ripley estate for the purpose 

129 



of subdivision and opening a private way for public use. This 
plan was approved and recommended for acceptance, provided 
certain conditions relating to the construction of a sewer line are 
met. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sidney P. White, Chairman 
Walter C. Tomlinson, Secretary 
Leon A. Field 
Frederick E. Cheever 
Kirk R. Batcheller 

Edward R. Lawson, Clerk 



130 



Report on Wages and Salaries Survey 



The Committee appointed for the purpose of making a survey 
of wages and salaries of employees of the Town of Andover has 
made this study with the assistance and advice of the heads of all 
of the various departments. 

Effort has been made to make comparisons of prevailing wages 
and salaries of communities in this section of the State. It was 
found that classifications were quite varied as to work performed 
and responsibilities assumed. Therefore consideration for adjust- 
ment was given accordingly. 

The Committee has confined its study strictly within the 
limits of the vote of the Special Town Meeting. Consequently, it is 
our understanding that any proposed adjustments are to be made 
on present basic wages, assignments and general work ccnditions. 
We are also passing this report to the Town Clerk on this day, 
January 19, 1951, for proper publicity purposes so that all inter- 
ested citizens may familiarize themselves with this report well in 
advance of Regular Town Meeting. 

The Committee wishes to express their appreciation and 
thanks to the Department heads and other Town officials with 
whom we conferred for their cooperation and able assistance 
which enabled us to arrive at what we trust are reasonable ad- 
justments to all concerned. 

Attached herewith are our recommendations which, if ac- 
cepted, should become effective on April 1, 1951. 

Emil J. Schulze 
William E. Titcomb 
Charles W. Arnold 



Police Department 



Chief 

Sergeant 

Patrolman 

Clerk 

New Officers 



$76.50 


to 


$85 . 00 


64.00 




72.00 


56.00 




62 . 00 


50.00 




54.00 
57.00 



131 



Fire Department 



Chief 


$ 76.50 


to I 


i 85.00 


Deputy 


64.00 




72.00 


Lieutenant 


61.00 




67.00 


Privates 


56.00 




62.00 


New Men 


51.00 




57.00 


Town Hall 






Town Clerk 


3500.00 
430.00 








500.00 


Plus 


300.00 


Clerks 


40.00 


to 


45.00 


Treasurer 


3340.00 


Plus 


400.00 


Accountant 


65.58 


Plus 


300.00 


Clerk 


34.00 


to 


37.00 


Tax Collector 


3415.00 


Plus 


300.00 


Tax Clerk 


43.50 


to 


45.00 


Assessors' Clerk 


40.00 


to 


50.00 


Assessors' Assistant Clerk 


35.00 


to 


37.00 


Welfare Agent 


3750.00 


Plus 


300.00 


Welfare Assistant 


44.00 


to 


48.00 


Janitor 


46.50 


to 


48.00 


Health Department Agent 


2400.00 


Plus 


300.00 


Civilian Defense Director 


76.50 




85.00 


Veterans' Service Officer 


70.00 


Plus 


300.00 


Veterans' Clerk 


40.00 


to 


45.00 


School 


Department 






Teachers 






260.00 


Nurses 






260.00 


Secretaries 






260.00 


Custodians (Full Time) 






208.00 


Bus Drivers 






208.00 


Board of 


Public Works 






Highway 








Laborers 


1.10 to 


l.l7J^perhr. 


Truck Drivers 


1.10 to 


1.25 


per hr 


Foreman 


1.35 to 


1.45 


per hr. 


Heavy Equipment Operators 


1.24 to 


1.30 


per hr. 



132 



Water and Sewer 

Foreman (2) 

Laborers 

Heavy Equipment Operators 

Park 

Foreman 

Laborers 

Pumping Station 
Resident Engineer 
Other Engineer 



$1.20 to 1.30 per 
1.10 to 1.17^ 
1.24 to 1.30 



hr. 



1.20 to 1 . 30 per hr. 
1.10 to 1.173^ 

1.35 to 1.45 per hr. 
1.19 to 1.30 



Supervision and 


Office 










Superintendent 




94.00 


weekly 


to 


5200.00 annu 


Assistant Superintendent 











Clerk 




45.00 




to 


45.00 same 


Clerk 




37.00 




to 


40.00 


Clerk 




44.00 




to 


45.00 


Engineer 




85.00 




to 


90.00 



Tree Warden and 
Moth Superintendent 
Foreman 
Expert Climbers 
Ground Men 



Tree Department 

62.00 to 67.00 weekly (44 hrs.) 
1.26 to 1.36 per hr. (44 hrs.) 
1.22 to 1.30 per hr. (44 hrs.) 
1.12 to 1.17}^ per hr. (44 hrs.) 



Superintendent 

Mechanic 

Laborers 



Cemetery Department 

2718 . 00 to 2926 . 00 annually 
1. 24 to 1.30 per hr. (40 hrs.) 
1. 13 to 1.1 7^ per hr. (40 hrs.) 



Library Department 



Librarian 

Assistant Librarian 
Children's Librarian 
Catalogue and Reference 
Secretary and Assistant 



3766 . 00 to 4066 . 00 annually 
2906.00 to 3166.00 
2806.00 to 3066.00 
2586.00 to 2846.00 
1638.02 to 1846.00 



133 



Janitor $2556 . 00 to $2660 . 00 

Part time Assistant Librarian (1) l.OOto 1.123/2 per hr. 

Ballardvale Librarian 600 . 00 to 660 . 00 annually 

Ballardvale Janitor 260 . 00 to 286 . 00 

Chairman of Selectmen 400 . 00 to 800 . 00 

Selectman 300.00 to 600.00 

Selectman 300.00 to 600.00 

Board of Public Works, Chairman 300 . 00 



134 



Report of Recreation Committee 



The Andover Recreation Committee submits its report for the 
year 1950: 

Playgrounds 

This division of recreation was supervised by Mr. James D. 
Doherty, with an assistant supervisor and twelve instructors. 
The system now operates five playgrounds; Central at Stowe 
School ; Shawsheen at Richardson School ; West Andover at West 
Center School ; Indian Ridge School and Ballardvale. 

Attendance Records 

Central 13862 

Shawsheen 2834 

Ballardvale 8753 

West Center 2481 

Indian Ridge 5271 

The usual program of activities was carried out including many 
special contests and exhibitions of handicraft work. Three hund- 
red and twenty-seven children attended the Annual Picnic at 
Canobie Lake Park. The Easter Egg Hunt was revived after a 
lapse of fifteen years and it was a most welcome and successful 
event. It was held on Easter Saturday afternoon in the Park and 
attracted over one thousand children who picked up more than 
11,000 candy packages in less than three minutes. The second 
Annual Hallowe'en Party was a gala event and an added attrac- 
tion this year was a parade of the children up Main Street to the 
Memorial Auditorium where twelve hundred children enjoyed 
an entertainment followed by refreshments. 

Swimming at Pomp's Pond 

This division was supervised by Mr. Donald D. Dunn, physical 
educator in the Public Schools. He was assisted by five instructors 
and a matron. The season was of nine weeks duration during 
which time a complete water safety program was conducted. 
Several highly successful water exhibitions of various phases of 
this work were given and the year was the most beneficial and en- 

135 



joyable to date. Provisions have been made for playing games, and 
tables and benches encourage cookouts and picnics for the parents 
as well as the children. Daily classes for beginners, swimmers, 
intermediates and advanced swimmers were held as well as classes 
for Junior and Senior Water Safety Certificates. Pomp's Pond is 
constantly improving and the entire staff has been very cooper- 
ative and enthusiastic about giving Andover one of the best swim- 
ming spots in this vicinity. 

Skating 

A new skating area, provided with flood lights, was sponsored 
in Ballardvale. The periods of skating have not been too numerous 
to date, but when weather permitted, both Ballardvale and the 
Playstead areas offered thorough enjoyment to large attendances. 

Acknowledgments 

The Recreation Committee wishes to express sincere thanks to 
the following: Mr. Irving E. Rogers of the Andover Townsman 
for the souvenir baseballs for the winning baseball team in the 
playground league; Mr. Maurice Holland of Canobie Lake Park 
for his generous cooperation to the children at the annual picnic; 
Mr. Jerome Cross of the Cross Coal Co. for his monetary assist- 
ance in the transportation of the children to Pomp's Pond; the 
several civic organizations and groups for the contributions to 
the Easter Egg Hunt and the Hallowe'en Party and the Brothers 
of The Sacred Heart School for their generosity in allowing our 
children to use their skating rink. 

Even though there are many improvements on the playgrounds 
and at Pomp's Pond which the committee would like to see de- 
veloped, they are pleased to state that this year they will not ask 
for any increase in the budget. 

Stafford A. Lindsay, Chairman 
Frank L. Caverly, Chairman 
Alan F. Dunlop 
Alco E. Taylor 
George A. Stanley, Jr. 



136 



Report of Special Committee on Water 
and Sewerage 



Your committee feels in view of present conditions that it 
should not recommend any major projects this year in connection 
with either the water or the sewerage systems. We hope that the 
Town will continue to realize the necessity of the improvements 
previously recommended, including additional reservoir capacity, 
another line from Phillips Street to the low service reservoir, and 
major replacements and additions to the high service system. 

Your committee, however, believes that the Town should con- 
tinue its practice of the past few years in appropriating a sum of 
money to be used by the Board of Public Works with the approval 
of the Board of Selectmen and the Finance Committee. And we 
specifically recommend that the Town this year carry over the 
balance of the appropriation of last year and in addition appro- 
priate $12,000 for the purpose of general improvements to the 
water system. 

While the committee does not recommend any action this year 
in regard to the Ballardvale sewer, we feel that the urgent need 
of this improvement should be kept in mind, and that the sewer 
should be constructed as soon as possible. 

William R. Edwards 
Sidney P. White 
Joseph A. McCarthy 

July 21, 1950 



137 



Andover Town Infirmary 



January 1, 1951 

Board of Selectmen, Andover, Mass. 
Gentlemen : 

The annual report of the matron of the Town Infirmary is 
given herewith : 

During the past year 17 adult persons and one child have been 
housed at the Infirmary, either temporarily or permanently. A 
woman with her baby were given shelter overnight as her funds 
had run out so that she had to wait for her husband to come and 
take her and the baby to their new home. Another old lady was 
given a two-weeks rest at the home and two men were given tem- 
porary shelter until they were able to work again. Another man 
who needed nursing care was taken to a nursing home, and one of 
the permanent residents suddenly developed a mania and had to 
be taken away. At present there are 1 1 persons at the Infirmary. 
All are in fairly good health in consideration of their age, and 
while one was in the Lawrence General Hospital when this report 
was written, we expect her home in a few days. During October 
several suffered a slight attack of the 24-hour grippe which seemed 
to be prevalent at the time, the matron having the worst case of 
it, but so far no more colds have developed. 

The insulation of the attic was done during the winter of 1949- 
50, and has made quite a difference in the conditioning of the 
rooms. During last fall the men's floor, cellar, and laundry were 
painted and it is proposed to do the women's floor this spring 
when the windows can be opened to let out the smell of paint. 
The outside of the house should be painted this year. A slight 
fire which caused very little damage except to two or three dry- 
as-dust shingles on the barn, was put out by the prompt arrival 
of the firemen. This was in October which was very dry. The 
house is surrounded by oak trees and evergreens and these should 
be thinned out and cleared away. The barn either should be sold, 
or shingled with asbestos shingles, and the building beside the 
garage should also be torn down, as it is falling down now. The 
barn, if sold, would make a very good house for someone who 

138 



could either do the work himself or would have a little money to 
lay out on it. 

The state inspector, Mrs. Doyle, gave a very good report of the 
conditions at the Infirmary, and those who have visited it for the 
first time always remark as to its cleanliness in upkeep. While we 
have a woman come in two or three days to help with the clean- 
ing, this condition is in a good part due to one of the women who 
lives here. She, however, is not able to do the work she formerly 
did, and as there are more inmates now, there should be more 
help. 

At Thanksgiving and Christmas we had our usual turkeys and 
Christmas tree with gifts for all. The folks were well remembered 
by the Abbot Christian Association, the November Club, King's 
Daughters, and individuals, so that everyone had a pleasant 
time. 

Number of Inmates, January 1, 1950 9 

Number admitted during year 8 

Number discharged during year 6 

Number of Inmates, January 1, 1951 11 

Number between 50 and 60 years 2 

Number between 60 and 70 years 2 

Number between 70 and 80 years 5 

Number between 80 and 90 years 2 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary C. Edmands, Matron 



139 



Fire Department 



January 31, 1951 
To the Board of Selectmen, 

Andover, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to submit my tenth annual report as Chief of 
the Andover Fire Department. 

During the year 1950 the department answered the following 
alarms: 68 bell, 240 still, total 308. 

Assessed value of buildings where fires occurred — $124,805. 

Loss in buildings where fires occurred — $26,752. 

Ambulance calls for the year totalled 577, of which 502 were 
answered by the Cadillac ambulance, 21 by the Henney ambu- 
lance, 32 by the Chief's car, 17 by Lieutenant Cole's car, 3 by 
Frances Sparks' car, 1 by Deputy Cole's car and 1 by the North 
Andover ambulance. 

Oil burners, oil tanks, liquid petroleum gas and other inspec- 
tions totalled 934. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. Edward Buchan, Chief 
Andover Fire Department 
Andover, Mass. 



140 



Police Department 



January 24, 1951 

Board of Selectmen 
Andover, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen : 

I hereby submit my report of the Police Department for the 
year ending December 31, 1950. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George A. Dane, 

Chief of Police 

DISPOSITION OF CASES 

Convicted in District Court 55 

Convicted in Andover Trial Justice Court 157 

On File — District Court 1 1 

On File — Trial Justice 13 

Released by Probation Officer 39 

Dismissed 1 

Turned Over to Out of Town Police 4 

Turned Over to Army Authorities 1 

Turned Over to Out of State Police 5 

Sentenced to House of Correction 1 1 

Fines Paid in District Court $1577.00 

Fines Paid in Trial Justice Court $1005 . 00 

Miscellaneous complaints received and investigated 393 

Summons served for out of town police 47 

Automobiles stolen in Andover 4 

Automobiles recovered in Andover 7 

Bicycles stolen in Andover 18 

Bicycles recovered in Andover 20 

Breaks in camps and dwellings 3 

Doors in business district found open and secured 84 

Lost children returned to parents 3 

Runaway children returned to parents or institutions 1 1 

Dogs killed by automobiles 21 

Dogs gassed by police 3 

141 



Street lights reported out to Lawrence Gas Company 662 

Dogs lost and returned to owner 9 

Number of persons bitten by dogs 29 
Board of Health and Animal Inspector notified on dog bites 29 

Cattle lost and returned to owners 2 

Dead bodies cared for by police 6 

Suicides reported and investigated by police 4 

Persons notified for out of town police 17 

Murder 1 

Tramps put up for night in lock up 2 

Dwelling houses inspected while owners away 148 

Articles found and returned to owners 16 

Summons served on local complaints in Andover 16 

Missing persons reported, located and returned 5 

Highway conditions reported to B.P.W. 8 

Tree Dept. notified of limbs and trees down in streets 2 

Persons taken to Danvers State Hospital by police 8 

Persons taken to hospital by police in cruisers 5 

Hens killed by dogs, investigated by police 804 

False alarms investigated by police 4 

Bell alarms covered by police 54 

Burglar alarms set off and investigated by police 9 

Autos ordered towed to garage 7 
Cards sent to Registry of Motor Vehicles on motor violations 227 

Arrests made for out of town police 5 

Breaks — business district 5 

License to operate motor vehicle suspended or revoked by 
Registry of Motor Vehicles for violations in Andover 
Residents of Andover 46 

Non Residents of Andover 28 

Fatal automobile accidents 8 



142 







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143 



Board of Health Nurse and Agent 



January 2, 1951 

To the Board of Health and Townspeople of Andover: 

I herewith submit a brief report as Board of Health Nurse and 
Agent for the Town of Andover for the year 1950: 

Diphtheria 

Incephalitis 

Dog Bite 

Tuberculosis 

Scarlet Fever 

Chicken Pox 

Whooping Cough 

Measles 

Mumps 

Syphilis 

Gonorrhea 

Infectious jaundice 

Meningitis O.F. 

Anterior Poliomyelitis 

Salmonella 

German Measles 

Totals 156 516 183 

Deaths from Contagious Diseases 
Lobar Pneumonia 

Pulmonary Tuberculosis 2 

Bacillary Dysentery 

Totals 2 1 2 

In 1951, Andover will continue to hold free clinics. Among 
these will be the Toxoid Clinic for children entering school, the 
Baby Clinic, and the Anti-Rabic Clinic for Dogs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lotta M. Johnson, R.N., R.S. 
144 



>50 


1949 


1948 

















1 


26 


39 


30 


3 


1 


7 


17 


5 


3 


82 


116 


22 


12 


4 


43 


2 


257 


61 


6 


79 


12 


3 


3 


2 





1 





1 














1 


2 


2 


1 





2 





2 


7 









1 


1 


1 









Milk Inspector's Report 



To the Andover Board of Health and Andover Townspeople : 

I submit herewith a brief summary of the activities of my 
office for the year ending December 31, 1950. 

The following licenses were granted after the inspection of pro- 
cessing plants and storage facilities : 
Milk and Cream — 69 (an increase of 4 over 1949) 
Oleomargarine — 16 (an increase of 1 over 1949) 
Ice Cream and Frozen Desserts — 4 (same as last year) 
Pasteurization of milk — 5 (same as last year) 

Fees for all of the above licenses have been collected and 
turned over to the Town Treasurer whose receipt I hold. 

During the year 65 samples of milk and 12 samples of cream 
were tested for butterfat and total solids content. Some of these 
samples were also tested for bacteria content and added water, at 
my Boston laboratory without added cost to the Town. All 
samples were up to standards and all producers and distributors 
were given reports on the tests made on their products. 

Periodic inspections have been made of places coming under 
my jurisdiction. Suggestions were made to several pasteurizers 
relative to decreasing the number of insects by adequate screening. 
Excellent cooperation was given by all to whom suggestions were 
made. 

Looking forward, your Milk Inspector hopes that everyone in 
this Town will cooperate to keep all of our potential sources of 
disease under full control. While milk is our most perfect food, it 
can also be our most dangerous food. All citizens should report 
any suspected infraction of the milk and cream laws to this office 
at once. It is the duty of all toguard the health of our townspeople. 

Respectfully, 

Robert A. Walsh, 

Milk Inspector 



145 



Report of Building Inspector 



To the Board of Selectmen : 
Town of Andover, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I submit herewith my report of the activities of this Depart- 
ment during the year of 1950. 

There have been two hundred and three permits for new build- 
ings and ninety-three permits for additions and alterations issued. 
The estimated building cost of new buildings total was two mil- 
lion five hundred thirty-three thousand five hundred dollars 
($2,533,500.00) and an estimated building cost for additions and 
alterations of one hundred forty-three thousand one hundred 
fifty dollars ($143,150.00) making a total of two million six hund- 
red seventy-six thousand six hundred fifty dollars ($2,676,650.00). 

The new building permits are classified as follows: 

Single Residences 130 

Single Garages 17 

2 Car Garages 11 

3 Car Garages 2 
Trailer Residences 2 
Camps 5. 
Office and Tool House 1 
Manufacturing and Sales Room 1 
Bee Storage and Tool House 1 
Tool Houses 3 
Greenhouse and Heating Plant 1 
Road Side Stand 1 
Grain Shed 1 
Storage Room 2 
Cellars 3 
Wood Shed 1 
Work Shop 1 
Produce and Sales Building 1 
Gymnasium 1 
Skating Rink 1 
Freezing Plant 1 

146 



Silos 2 

Sun Porch 2 

Pig Shelters 5 

Chicken Houses 10 

Total 203 

This Department has collected in fees and turned over to the 
Town Treasurer Two Thousand Nine Hundred Thirty Seven 
Dollars ($2,937.00). 

I have made Eleven Hundred and Seventy-Two (1172) inspec- 
tions during the past year. 



Respectfully yours, 



Ralph W. Coleman, 

Building Inspector 



Report of Wire Inspector 

January 11, 1951 
Board of Selectmen 
Town of Andover, Massachusetts 

.Dear Sirs: 

I hereby submit my report for electrical inspections covered 
by me for the year 1950. 

Total wiring inspection 553 

Fixtures 76 



Total 629 

Amount collected and turned over to Treasurer, Town of 
Andover, $629.00. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William J. Young, Inspector of Wires 
147 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 



December 31, 1950 

To the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Andover 

Gentlemen : 

I hereby submit my annual report for the year 1950: 

Scales 

Adjusted Sealed Condem. 
Platform over 10,000 
5000 to 10,000 
100 to 5000 
under 100 

Weights and Measures 
Weights 214 





4 




1 


39 


115 


12 


102 



Linear measures 




10 


Vehicle tanks (bulk) 




1 (2990 gals.) 


Gasoline pumps 


3 


52 


Vehicle tank systems 


2 


10 1 


Other automatic liquid measure 


1 


67 



Other Work Performed 
Complaints investigated 9 

Trial weighings and measurement of commodities 

sold or put up for sale 371 

Other inspections: Pedlars, oil and coal certificates, 

food packages, etc. 461 

Court cases 1 

Total collections from January 1, 1950 to December 31, 1950 
were $323.80 (three hundred twenty- three dollars and eighty 
cents). 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph Serio, Sealer 



148 



Report of Tree Warden 

January 1, 1951 

To the Citizens of Andover: 

Great interest was shown last spring in the planting of new 
trees along our streets. Besides the trees furnished by the town, 
the Andover Garden Club generously gave twenty-six splendid 
young trees to replace trees removed in recent years. A plan to 
keep Andover beautiful for the enjoyment of future generations. 

Our public trees produced an abundance of leaves in the 
spring, but were not able to support them all during the dry 
summer. The leaves showed dryness and many dropped early. 
The continued dry weather through 1950 seriously affected the 
health of many public trees. The lowering of the water table 
affected the root system, which in turn weakened the trees and 
caused many branches to die back. 

Many public trees on our streets were fed through the leaves 
by spraying them with a specially prepared tree food. Young 
trees were watered by the tree department in the summer by 
pumping the liquid into the ground from our spraying machine. 
Many citizens also assisted by watering trees in front of their 
property. 

The A.V.I.S. generously furnished the Tree Warden with 
nearly $500.00 worth of chemicals for the destruction of poison 
ivy along our roadsides. This work should be continued each 
year to keep the poison ivy from again obtaining a foothold. 

Our tractor mower covered practically all our roadsides, cutting 
grass, weeds and brush next to the traveled way, improving them 
as to appearance and as a convenience to travel, greatly appre- 
ciated by many citizens, and an improvement highly commended 
by visitors from other communities. 

Our tractor mower has done very strenuous work in accom- 
plishing this much desired improvement; parts have become 
worn and I recommend replacement of this unit by a modern 
machine, as parts on the old machine break and long delays are 
caused waiting for replacement parts, sometimes for many weeks. 

I recommend the purchase of a 4 H.P. and a 7 H.P. chain saw 
to replace our old saw which should be turned in as part payment. 

149 



Tree removal has increased greatly, due to the destructive Dutch 
elm disease. 

Nine high wind storms and a sleet storm tore many branches 
from the trees, causing much extra tree repair work and time 
consumed in removing debris from the streets. Climaxing these 
storms was one of hurricane force on the afternoon and night of 
November 25th which caused the loss of twenty public trees. 
Electric light wires and telephone lines were blown down while 
rain driven by the hurricane winds made it next to impossible to 
carry on at times during the night. These storms disrupted plans 
for tree improvement work and delayed all regular tree work. 

I recommend that $12,350.00 be appropriated to carry on the 
regular work in the Tree Warden's Department in 1951. Such a 
budget provides for the following: 

Warden's Salary 

Labor (3 men) 

Gasoline, Oil, Tractor, Power Saw and Truck 

Maintenance 
Rent of Shop and Garage 
Hardware and Tools 
Trees, Loam and Fertilizer 
Telephone, Printing and all other items 

$12,350.00 
Respectfully submitted, 

George R. Abbott, Tree Warden 



$1904.00 


9026. 


16 


685. 


00 


210 


00 


200 


00 


190 


00 


134. 


84 



150 



Report of Moth Superintendent 



January 1, 1951 
To the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Andover: 
Gentlemen : 

By Acts of the Legislature in 1948 and 1949, control of leaf 
eating insects increased from three species to seven. The season 
of control, by spraying, May through July, is now extended 
from April through September. 

The law also authorizes the Moth Superintendent to prune 
public elm trees and requires removal of all elm trees proven by 
laboratory test to have the Dutch elm disease, whether on public 
property or on private property within 500 feet of public property. 

To carry on this work it is necessary to follow out a control 
program : 

1. Scouting for suspected infected trees. 

2. Taking samples from suspected trees, and sending them 
to the shade tree laboratory at Amherst. Taking samples often 
requires climbing to branches high in the trees. 

3. Removal and burning of elms proven by laboratory test to 
have the disease. 

a. Public trees. 

b. Private trees within 500 feet of public property. 

4. Spraying elms three times each season to destroy the elm 
bark beetle, carrier of the disease. 

5. Pruning out dead and weak wood in healthy elm trees to 
destroy places where the elm bark beetles might find shelter to 
•complete their life cycle and cause possible infection to other 
trees. 

6. Removal and burning freshly cut elm wood and elm piles 
left in the open with bark on. 

In our control work against the elm bark beetle and the dis- 
eased trees the above program was carried out as nearly as 
possible. 

Pruning large elm trees is slow, expensive work and only a 
limited number can be pruned with funds available. 

Spraying against the elm bark beetle started early in April. 
Spray against the elm leaf beetle in late May and early June is 
also a help against the elm bark beetle. 

151 



^Another spray in late July was given the elms, and this spray 
helped control early emerging fall web worms. 

The first diseased tree was found in early June on Holt Road. 
Many samples were sent to the laboratory in July, August and 
September. Fifty-four elm trees proved to have the disease, 
ranging in size from clumps two inches in diameter up to a single 
tree on Lowell Street eight feet in diameter. 

The year 1950 proved to be ideal for the spread of the disease. 
The trees weakened by long, dry weather were less able to resist 
infection. The greatest number of diseased elms were in the 
Shawsheen area where the disease was first found but other parts 
of the town also suffered loss. 

Greater effort is needed to check and retard this disease which 
since 1946 has gained a strong foothold. 

By a vote at the last annual town meeting I w T as enabled to use 
funds in seeking information outside the Commonwealth. I 
attended the National Shade Tree Conference in Syracuse, New 
York, in August, where reports were given by National research 
men. Meetings and exhibitions of insects and tree diseases at the 
New York State College of Forestry and demonstrations of 
equipment at Thornden Park were especially notable. Shade 
tree men from all parts of the United States and Canada at- 
tended. A former Andover man operates a large shade tree service 
company in Syracuse and served on one of the committees at the 
Conference. 

Dr. May reported that injections of chemicals to elm trees or 
feeding them through the soil that gave good promise of prevent- 
ing the Dutch elm disease in 1949 did not stand up in 1950. 

Illustrations were shown of the different ways the Dutch elm 
disease first indicated itself, and could be used to detect diseased 
trees in the early stages. 

Under Chapter 761 the town is required to continue work on 
control of the Dutch elm disease. A separate appropriation is re- 
quired to be made for this work. I recommend that $4,166.50 
be appropriated at the annual town meeting. For the regular 
Moth Department appropriation against leaf chewing insects 
I recommend that $8,364.00 be appropriated. 

George R. Abbott, 

Moth Superintendent 

152 



Town of Andover — Jury List 



JUNE, 1950 



Adams, George J. 
Anderson, Ernest E. 
Avery, John 
Babb, Benjamin 
Bachman, Herbert L. 
Baldwin, James R. 
Barnard, W. Shirley 
Barrett, John S. 
Barrett, Joseph F. 
Bateson, James 
Beedie, Alexander 
Belul, Febi 

Bendroth, Harold W. B. 
Berry, Ralph T. 
Bissett, James R. 
Blake, Preston H. 
Bliss, Arthur 
Blomquist, Bror G. 
Bramley, Edwin L. 
Brooks, Arthur 
Brouillard, Joseph 
Brown, George B. 
Buxton, Walter E. 
Cairnie, Henry 
Cairnie, Robert Y. 
Chadwick, Harry 
Chadwick Nathaniel 
Chambers, Arthur S. 
Cheney, Paul G. 
Clark, Dana W. 
Clark, Myron H. 
Clough, Harry E. 
Cole, John N. 2nd 
Comber, Joseph 
Connor, Joseph W. 
Conway, John J. 



Cable Splicer 28 Pasho St. 

Farmer Ballard vale Rd. 

Civil Engineer 36 Morton St. 
Overseer 52 Balmoral St. 

Janitor 18 Stratford Rd. 

Civil Engineer 19 William St. 
Real Estate 12 High St. 

Clerk 63 Burnham Rd. 

Salesman 102 Chestnut St. 

Truck Driver 51 Red Spring Rd. 
Janitor 8 Elm St. 

Rubber Worker 109 Pine St. 
Student 17 High St. 

Cloth Examiner 83 Pine St. 

Recreation Dir. 11 Chestnut St. 
Food Broker 7 Stratford Rd. 
Retired 1 Hidden Rd. 

Electrician 49 Union St. 

Telephone Mgr. Appletree Lane 
Chemist 357 No. Main St. 

Painter Bailey Rd. 

Shipper 29 Main St. 

Painter 19 Summer St. 

Shipper 120 No. Main St. 

'Operative 18 Baker Lane 

Janitor 34 Avon St. 

Clerk 4 Main St. Terr. 

Farmer Lowell St. 

Cook 76 Chestnut St. 

Civil Engineer 3 Punchard Ave. 
Mgr. Consult. 30 Chestnut St. 
Ins. Agent 117 Chestnut St. 
Andover Press 10 Wolcott Ave. 
Signal Operator Center St. B.V. 
Gas Station Prop. 107 High St. 
Manager Jenkins Rd. 

153 



Daniels, Roy A. 
Dearborn, Roy S. 
D'Entremont, Francis H. 
Disbrow, Herbert 
Dole, Percy "J. 
Dufton, George F. 
Elliott, Leonard 
Ellis, Franklin T. 
Ellison, Arthur N. 
Fairweather, James D. 
Fallon, Joseph E. Jr. 
Flather, Frederick Jr. 
Fleming, John J. 
Gahm, George L. 
Gaskill, John G. 
Gilchreast, Cleveland 
Glines, Roland B. 
Gilfoy, Elven W. 
Gill, Joseph M. 
Gilman, Albert E. 
Godfrey, Harold T. 
Golden, William H. 
Gouck, Harry 
Greenwood, Ralph L. 
Gray, Claremont I. 
Greenfield, Alfred 
Hadley, Ralph E. 
Hamblet, William P. 
Hardy, Frederick C. 
Harnedy, William A. 
Haselton, George E. 
Hatch, William G. 
Hickey, Vincent P. 
Hill, Charles A. 
Hill, William R. 
Hodge, Robert 
Holland, Robert C. 
Jaques, Robert G. 
Johnson, Howard B. 
Kearn, Frederick 



Electrician 
Clerk 

Bus Driver 
Farmer 



78 Chestnut St. 

109 Elm St. 

132 Main St. 

Chandler Rd. 



Trucking 19 Washington Ave. 
Contractor 7 Argyle St. 

Retired 34 Summer St. 

Dresser 109 Elm St. 

Farmer Ballard vale Rd. 

Caretaker 15 Abbot St. 

Accountant 58 Maple Ave. 

Manufacturer 45 Abbot St. 
Contractor 37 Maple Ave. 

Retired 23 William St. 

Minister Lowell St. 

Egg Manager 23 Bartlet St. 
Electrician 63 Bartlet St. 

Mechanic 29 Summer St. 

Carpenter 16 Cuba St. 

Watchman Lowell St. 

Salesman 33 Pasho St. 

Farmer 22 Carmel Rd. 

Clerk 10 Burnham Rd. 

Operative Tewksbury St. B.V. 
Clerk 34 Washington Ave. 

Retired 68 Haverhill St. 

Retired 30 Wolcott Ave. 

Draftsman 62 Chestnut St. 

Operative 46^ High St. 

Assistant Manager 101 Elm St. 
Insurance 11 Cheever Circle 
Technician 215 Lupine Rd. 

Accountant 232 No. Main St. 
Electrician 13 Chestnut St. 

Storekeeper 72 Salem St. 

Retired 74 Chestnut St. 

Cost Account. 120 Chestnut St. 
Janitor 69 Maple Ave. 

Engineer 66 Carmel Rd. 

Carpenter Haggetts Pond Rd. 

154 



Kelley, Sherwood W. 
Kinsman, Leslie S. 
Kress, Fred 
Lindsay, Stafford A. 
Livingston, Clinton R. 
Livingston, George F. 
Locke, Richard G. 
Locke, Sherman S. 
Look, Donald B. 
Luce, Rowland L. 
Lynch, James A. 
Manthorne, Harold N. 
Marshall, Clifford E. 
McCarthy, Frank G. 
Monahan, Francis 
Monan, Joseph C. 
Mooar, Philip C. 
Morgan, Norman 
Muelig, Emil 
Muller, Walter F. 
Murphy, Michael M. 
Nelson, Edward J. 
Newman, Winthrop R. 
Newton, Charles M. 
Nicoll, Frank L. 
Noss, Frederick B. 
Noyes, Lee E. 
O'Connell, Charles H. 
O'Connell, John F. 
O'Connor, Michael J. 
Patterson, Willard H. 
Pearson, Walter 
Pendleton, Andrew S. 
Peterson, Elmer O. 
Peters, Howarth J. 
Petrie, Alexander B. 
Petrie, John P. T. 
Pitman, Douglas B. 
Purdon, Frank L. 
Quinn, Peter D. 



Salesman 16 Coolidge Rd. 

Marine Engineer 18 Summer St. 
Operative Lowell St. 

Salesman 6 Argyle St. 

Florist Andover St. 

Farmer Brown St. 

Contractor 3 Windsor St. 

Contractor 5 Windsor St. 

Photographer 115 Main St. 

Furniture 19 Summer St. 

Farmer Gray Rd. 

Veteran 31 Washington Ave. 
Cashier 22 Pasho St. 

Contractor 12 Wolcott Ave. 
Operative 3 Stirling St. 

Tel. Co. Tester • 7 Argyle St. 
Mechanic 108 Lowell St. 

Poultryman Lowell St. 

Retired 25 Avon St. 

Clerk 3 Lupine Rd. 

Machinist 94 Haverhill St. 

Retired 99 High St. 

Clerk 121 Elm St. 

Poultryman Boutwell Rd. 

Painter 2 Stratford Rd. 

Minister 62 Elm St. 

Lumber Yard Mgr. 53 Whit. St. 
Plumber 95 Chestnut St. 

Counsellor 1 Punchard Ave. 
Chauffeur 49 Elm St. 

Machinist Helper Upland Rd. 
Auto Salesman 12 Florence St. 
Poultryman Dascomb Rd. 

Poultryman Greenwood Rd. 
Printer 79 Elm St. 

Gardener 51 Bartlet St. 

Gardener 53 Bartlet St. 

Accountant 78 Salem St. 

Ret. Army Off. 65 Central St. 
Plumber 44 River St., B. Y. 



155 



Robb, David B. 
Robertson, Foster G. 
Rogers, Irving E. 
Ronan, William A. 
Roundy, Glen H. 
Schofield, James F. 
Sellars, Harry 
Shaw, Clinton D. 
Sheeley, Russell F. 
Sherry, Richard A. 
Smith, Arthur J. 
Smith, Frederick C. 
Stack, Robert A. 
Stark, John W. 
Stevenson, Henry J. 
Stone, Robert L. 
Sutton, Osborne 
Taylor, Thomas D. 
Teichert, Frederick E. 
Thomas, Horace R. 
Thomson, James G. 
Tucker, Charles H. 
Turner, Harvey G. 
Wade, Albert N. ' 
Wade, Kenneth E. 
Ward, Everett 
Weeks, Clarence H. 
West, Howard 
Whitcomb, Irving J. 

Whitcomb, Roger H. 
White, Frederick 
Whiteside, Charles B. M. 
Wilkinson, Ernest 
Williams, Richard L. 
Wilson, P. Leroy 
Wood, Cornelius A. 
Young, William J. 
Zalla, Eugene 



Janitor 
Caretaker 
Publisher 
Chauffeur 



32 Park St. 

7 Canterbury St. 

Sunset Rock Rd. 

60 Morton St. 



Purch. Agent 48 Wolcott Ave. 
Loomfixer 11 Tewksbury St.B.V. 
Selling Agent 5 Avon St. 

Salesman Wildwood Rd. 

Electrician 17 Enmore St. 

Chauffeur River St., B.V. 

Bricklayer Rattlesnake Hill Rd. 
Insurance 6 Stratford Rd. 

Operative 20 Summer St. 

Retired 26 Marland St. 

Mech. Eng. 68 Cheever Circle 
Contractor So. Main St. 

Candy Maker 119 Chestnut St. 
Machinist 79 Lowell St. 

Manufacturer West Knoll Rd. 
Retired 129 Lowell St. 

Operative 42 Summer St. 

Operative 111 Abbot St. 

Farmer So. Main St. 

Retired 91 Lowell St. 

Carpenter High St., B.V. 

Insurance Agent 72 Park St. 
Com. Agent 66 Chestnut St. 
Power House Haggetts Pond Rd. 
Insurance Salesman 

3 Main St. Terr. 
Clerk 3 Main St. Terr. 

Salesman 196 Shawsheen Rd. 
Purch. Agent 53 Whittier St. 
Real Est. & Ins. 57 Salem St. 
Inspector 173 Lowell St. 

Newsdealer 9 Avon St. 

Trustee 276 No. Main St. 

Electrician 44 Elm St. 

Ship. Clerk 3 Chester St., B.V. 



156 



Trustees and Staff of Memorial 
Hall Library 



CAROLINE P. LEAVITT LEO F. DALEY 

WINSOR GALE ARTHUR W. REYNOLDS 

E. DEAN WALEN WILLIAM N. PERRY 

ALAN R. BLACKMER 

Chairman 
WINSOR GALE 

Secretary 
WILLIAM N. PERRY 

Treasurer 
ARTHUR W. REYNOLDS 

Librarian 
MIRIAM PUTNAM 

MARGARET D. MANNING, Assistant Librarian, in charge, 
Readers' Services 

MARGARET LANE, Children's Librarian 

MARY F. ZECCHINI, Catalog and Reference Librarian 

ELEANORE G. BLISS, Circulation Assistant* 

CAROLYN S. BENVROTYL, Secretarial Assistant 

M. ETHEL ZINK, Branch Librarian, Ballard Vale 

Janitor 
ARCHIBALD D. MACLAREN 

* Part-time 

157 



THE LIBRARY SERVES THE INDIVIDUAL 

A number of years ago there appeared a book with the provoca- 
tive title The Education of the Whole Man. The exact thesis of the 
book does not concern this report directly. The exciting idea im- 
plicit in the title, however, lies very close to the major purpose of 
the public library, which perhaps more than any other institution 
is geared to serve the ''whole man." It thinks primarily in terms 
of the individual, and the group activities it carries on are in- 
formal in character. This informality and the concern for the 
individual and his need are doubly important in a world where so 
much is done on a mass scale — entertainment — business — com- 
munication — government — perhaps even education. A library 
user who said, "This library makes me feel like a human being 
again," dramatically demonstrated this very point. 

The Library and the Individual 

A public library does not exploit; has no special axe to grind. 
It serves the individual, or tries to, at the point where he is, know- 
ing full well that at another time he may be a completely different 
person with completely different needs. Its aim is to help in the 
development of an individual whose life is rich and rewarding 
because he has made the most of his potentialities. The public 
library welcomes every opportunity to spread before the individu- 
al books on significant issues, books which stretch his mind, give 
him understanding and sharpen his imagination. The public 
library's book collection is many-sided, with books representing 
many viewpoints. Its service is skillful if it can tempt readers to 
sample books which do more than bolster up already preconceived 
opinions. 

The individual, the library finds a hopeful being even when his 
senses are assailed by war and rumors of war, with economic un- 
certainties and pleas for austerities. He seeks the library out for 
material which will help him plan a new home or remodel an old 
one, make toys for his children's Christmas, assist him in his 
work, or give him information about a new and more desirable 
field of work. If feminine, although the female has no monopoly, 
this individual may choose books which make for informed citizen 
action, or those that will make for better parent-child relation- 
ships, or still others about creative undertakings — rug-hooking, 
tray painting — to mention but two of the manifold handicraft 

158 



interests. The public library has to be alert to keep up with its 
readers ! 

The Library and Young People 

Important individuals are the boys and girls and young people 
who need everything that a well-supported library can give 
them, for despite the H-bomb, there is hope that they will live to 
see a peaceful world in which to function creatively. A young 
people's program must be geared to their needs now and to the 
future unfolding of their inquiring minds. The Young People's 
Library has such a program and its collection of carefully selected 
books gives present pleasure, helps form habits of discrimination 
and builds values which endure in stress as well as in gentler 
times. 

The Library as a Distributor of Ideas 

The public library has a special importance to the individual 
because of the kinds of materials, book and otherwise, that it 
stocks. It plays a very small part actually in the total distribution 
picture but it performs a service within its own orbit that dis- 
tributors of mass media can not hope to do. The Public Library 
Inquiry, a recently published objective survey, underscores the 
importance of the public library, as one non-commercial agency 
where the individual can expect to find the most authoritative 
of the contemporary books; to find the artistic and cultural books; 
the unpopular and experimental ; the not new although currently 
relevant; and non-book materials such as pictures, recordings, 
and in an increasing number of libraries, 16-mm films. 
- Carefully selected books, pamphlets, and magazines may not 
batter against the mind — or perhaps better the senses — with the 
ferocity of the mass media — the radio, the highly colored news- 
paper or magazine — but they have more lasting influence and in 
the long run have more to do with setting and changing opinion. 

The Library's Public 

Bernard Berelson, Dean of the Graduate Library School of the 
University of Chicago, in his study The Library's Public shows 
that while practically everyone reads a newspaper, listens to the 
radio — perhaps it should be added looks at television — only one 
person in four reads a book a month. It would be interesting to 
know how this finding checks with book reading in the Andover 

159 



community. This has implications for the public library. Will it 
be possible to attract some of the non-book-reading public? 
Should the public library perhaps limit the amount of ephemeral 
and light weight recreational material which it adds and put its 
major attention on materials of more significance which are not 
so readily available except at the library? 

The Library Available Around the Clock 

The library is available to the individual the whole year 
round and its liberal schedule of hours makes it possible for almost 
anyone to use it despite hours of w T ork. The library is sensitive to 
the slow round of the year and needs no calendar to tell the 
changing seasons. The demands of its users keep it alert to each 
day's significance. In the library, too, there is a time of planting 
and reaping, of holiday making, a time for self-improvement — in 
fact a time for almost every interest under the sun. 

The Library Year Unfolds 

The library year with its activities has been well-recorded and 
it would be repetitious to recount it in detail. A few impressions 
follow, particularly those which seem to offer most of value to the 
individual, the keystone of the library's structure. 

The Library and Films 

Since the film has become so powerful an instrument in the 
dissemination of ideas, the Memorial Hall Library has cast 
around for ways in which films could best be promoted in the 
community. More than sixty public libraries in the United States 
have their own collections of 16-mm films for community use. 
Probably the Memorial Hall Library will never own films out- 
right but it may one day become part of a regional plan whereby 
for stated intervals, it will have changing packets of films avail- 
able for community use. In an effort to promote film awareness, 
the library has held film preview meetings, developed a film in- 
formation service and a booking service for community groups, in 
addition to its own film programs. It is early to assess results but 
increasingly the library is called upon for film information, to 
plan film programs and to book films. A Film Festival, held in 
March and April, gave many people ample opportunity to dis- 
cover the beauty and importance of many of these films. 

160 



The Library and Recordings 

Another non-book media, the recording, has gradually come to 
the fore in public libraries. Only three years old the Memorial 
Hall Library record collection has proved to be one of the most 
popular library services for young and old alike. South Pacific, 
The Gondoliers, George Gershwin vie in popularity with Bach, 
Brahms, Beethoven and other musical "greats", classical and 
modern. The demand for Christmas carol recordings was almost 
more than the collection could meet and shows one way in which 
the library serves the seasons in their rounds. Some borrowers 
are finding delight in non-musical recordings — Robert Frost 
reading his poems, Judith Anderson in Macbeth. 

But More Important the Books 

Important as films and recordings are, they can never take 
the place of the printed page. A general impression more or less 
buttressed by frequent examination of books in use points to an 
upturn in the reading of thoughtful and worth-while books. 
Book circulation has not, however, kept pace with population 
growth and in this television has no doubt been a factor. Circula- 
tion of recordings, pamphlets and subject books showed a slight 
gain for the year. There was a slight falling off in the amount of 
fiction borrowed. One of the 1950 trends, not perhaps so note- 
worthy, has been the skyrocketing popularity of science fiction, 
to which might be joined several subject books published as seri- 
ous scientific works. It will be interesting to see what future 
social historians make of this trend. 

The Individual Asks Questions 

Some questions in slightly varying form are asked over and 
over again. Others are the only ones of their kind. Occasionally a 
few are "stickers" which necessitate calling upon the resources of 
larger collections. In these days of high prices and conflicting 
advertising claims, consumer questions come to the fore with con- 
sumer magazines literally read to tatters as people seek to find the 
"best buy" in radios, television sets, washing machines. "How-to- 
do-it" books seldom gather any dust on the shelves as they are 
called into service to answer one demand after another. A few 
typical questions will suffice to show the variety and the need for 

161 



a wisely selected and broad-in-scope book collection to answer 
them. 

What do you feed young turtles after they are hatched? 

How do you build a compost pile? brick steps? an 11 -foot kayak? 

How many white corpuscles are there in the blood of a normal 
person? 

What encyclopedia shall I buy for my child? 

W T hat is the trucking distance between Belle, West Virginia, and 
Wilmington, Delaware? 

Have you books which will show how to electroplate with gold 
and silver? 

What is the average flow of water in rivers and streams in 
Massachusetts and New Hampshire? 

What books will help a young man become more aggressive in 
putting his ideas across? 

What is the address of the Denver Fire Clay Company? 

Boys and Girls Like Stories 

Impressions of a library year must include mention of the film 
and story hours for boys and girls. The carefully selected films 
and stories are an important factor in building discriminating 
taste for films and literature and for increasing understanding of 
other people and their ways. "They don't want to miss them," 
one mother told us, pleased that television had not completely 
taken over. The Young People's Library literally bulges at the 
seams as boys and girls pour into it on film and story days. 

Mothers and Children Enjoy the Library Together 

On any Wednesday morning during the school year at ten 
o'clock in the Young People's Library, a chance visitor would 
find twenty to twenty-five three- and four-year-olds, listening to 
records, playing games, being enthralled by stories. The popu- 
larity of this activity has meant dividing the group in two this 
fall, with Bluebirds and Robins meeting on alternate weeks. 
Mothers meet for discussion at the same time with an occasional 
film and outside speaker. As one mother put it, "I look forward 
to the meetings just as much as my child does." A three-year-old, 
not usually demonstrative, tells her mother after the Christmas 
party, "Wasn't it lovely?" If there is anything in early condition- 
ing, the library should not want for intelligent users in the years 
to come. 

162 



Our Variety of Great Books Discussion 

No list of peaks would be complete without mention of the 
group which met together over a period of eight weeks to read and 
discuss Thomas Mann's Magic Mountain: It was difficult reading 
made the more rewarding because of the rich background which 
the leader, Dr. Walter Hasenclever of the Phillips Faculty, 
brought to the discussions. 

The Library and United Nations Week 

Books and pamphlets about the United Nations abound in the 
library's collection but to focus attention even more dramatically 
on United Nations Week, the United Nations flag was flown from 
the library flag pole. At the end of United Nations Day, a small 
group of Brownies gathered to help take down the flag, each one 
eager to touch this symbol of world hope. Whatever United 
Nations vicissitudes may be in the coming days, this was a mo- 
ment to be remembered. 

The Library Staff Classification and Pay Plan 

This past year the Library Board adopted a new Classification 
and Pay Plan. It has importance among the outstanding events 
of the year since to attract well-trained librarians and to keep 
them, the library must offer salaries comparable to those offered 
in other parts of the country, yet in keeping with the salary pat- 
tern for similar work in its own community. It has importance, 
too, because of the implications which it has for good and efficient 
service to the individual. 

The Library Has Its Face Lifted 

Rather prosaic perhaps, but important in the scheme of things, 
was the repainting of the library exterior and the installation of 
oil heat. Maintenance of plant is essential in keeping a building 
bright, well-ordered and attractive. A new building not being in 
the foreseeable future, it is the more imperative that the present 
building be modernized and equipped in keeping with its present 
usefulness. 

The Library and Its Friends 

The library has no formal Friends of the Library, but it does 
have library friends, many of them! A hearty and appreciative 
thank-you goes to those who contributed books, or lovely and 

L63 



unusual flowers in season; to the Andover Village Improvement 
Society for its project to beautify the library grounds; to the 
Andover Evening Study Program for its gift of two hundred 
dollars which was used for the Film Festival and for shades for 
Memorial Hall; to the Futterman Trust which gave this library 
fifty dollars for recordings from a fund set up for this purpose; 
to the Garden Club for a flowering crab which fortunately seems 
to have survived a spring and summer drought; to Mr. Howard 
Coon for the gift of one of his oil paintings to the Ballard Vale 
Branch Library and to the many others who have given tangible 
evidence of their affection for the library and its works. 

A Cooperative Enterprise 

Each individual whether he thinks of it in just this way or not 
took part in a cooperative venture of some size. He had recourse 
to a book collection which he could not and would not want to 
provide for himself. Help in the selection of books, in finding in- 
formation on a desired subject were his for the asking. He could 
participate in as many of the special programs arranged during 
the year as his fancy dictated. Many individuals got far more 
from their investment than they put into it in actual dollars and 
cents of tax money in 1950. More got very little in direct service, 
although most of them feel satisfaction in knowing that such re- 
sources exist to be drawn upon when needed. 

The Memorial Hall Library serves the individual; there is no 
doubt of that. Contrary to some notions of its work, the public 
library is very much in the stream of life. It participates, although 
vicariously, in the joys and sorrows of its users. It knows when 
there has been a new life or when one has ended. The whole-cycle 
of life is played out as the individual's use of the library spans his 
lifetime from his first days with the unrivalled joy of being able 
to read through youth, adulthood and old age. One of the library's 
oldest users, in an exchange of Christmas greetings along Main 
Street remarked, "There will always be a Santa Claus for me as 
long as I am able to get to that building across the street." May 
"that building across the street" continue in the new year and in 
the years beyond to merit such warm-hearted approval and af- 
fection. 



164 



1950 STATISTICS OF LIBRARY USE 



BOOK STOCK 

Volumes at beginning of year 
Volumes added by purchase 
Volumes added by gift 
Volumes lost or withdrawn 
Lost volumes found 

Total volumes at end of year 

Newspapers and Periodicals currently received 
Periodicals received by gift 

USE 



Volumes of adult fiction loaned 
Volumes of adult non-fiction loaned 
*Number of children's books loaned 
Number of adult records loaned 
Number of children's records loaned 
Number of pictures loaned 



Adult Juvenile 


Total 


36,246 9,509 




45,755 


1,478 948 




2,426 


107 2 




109 


450 569 




1,019 


4 




4 


37,385 9,890 


47,275 


' received 




145 
36 




% 


of total 


Volumes 


circulation 


43,369 




38.2 


29,281 




25.9 


34,507 




30.4 


5,060 






799 




5.5 


376 







Total number of books, records, etc. 
loaned 



113,392 



REGISTRATION 

Adult Juvenile Total 

Borrowers registered during year 544 322 866 

**Total number of registered borrowers 3,205 1,376 4,581 

Circulation per capita (based on 1945 census figures) 9 . 5 



"Included in this total is 6326 recorded school circulation. 
Total books sent on school deposit numbered 8634 and each of 
these books was probably used from two to twenty times. The 
library, however, counts only recorded circulation. 

**This is the first year thai adult borrowers' registrations have 
automatically expired. This accounts for the apparent smaller 
total of registered adult library users. 

165 



Board of Public Works 



Andover, Mass. 
January 1, 1951 

The Board of Public Works voted to adopt the following re- 
ports of the Superintendent and Engineer as its reports for 1950 
with recommendations for 1951. 

Sidney P. White, Chairman 
Edward A. Doyle, Secretary 
John H. Kelly 
P. Leroy Wilson 
Alexander H. Henderson 



166 



Superintendent's Report 



To the Board of Public Works: 

Gentlemen : 

The major activities and developments in the Highway, Water, 
Sewer, Park and Street Lighting Departments during the year 
which ended December 31, 1950 were as follows: 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

The following table in inches shows the snowfall for the year 
1950: 

January 7 . 6 Inches 

February 16.7 Inches 

March 6 . 7 Inches 

November . 2 Inches 

December 2.9 Inches 



Total 34.1 Inches 

The snowfall for the season November 1949 to March 1950 in- 
clusive totaled 37.25 inches. 

The following roads were resurfaced with tar and honed: 
Cornell Avenue, Dascomb Road, Osgood Street, Dufton Road, 
Burnham Road, Porter Road, Hidden Road, Phillips Street, 
Morton Street, Bancroft Road, Gray Road, Shawsheen Road, 
Canterbury Street, Greenwood Road, Gleason Street, Webster 
Street, Corbett Street, Magnolia Avenue, Poor Street, West 
Knoll Road, Alderbrook Road, Rattlesnake Hill Road, Sher- 
bourne Street, Whittier Street, County Road, Woburn Street, 
Ayer Street, Argilla Road, Stevens Street, River Street, Lowell 
Junction Road, Ayer Street, Marwood Drive, and sections of the 
following streets: Central Street, Chestnut Street, Princeton 
Avenue, Red Spring Road, Gould Road, Wildwood Road, High 
Plain Road, Abbot Street, Highland Road, High Street, Salem 
Street, Reservation Road, North Street, Chandler Road, Beacon 
Street, Andover Street, Bannister Road and Bradlee School 
Driveway. 

167 



A total of 112,033 gallons of tar was applied. 

Article 8 covered work done with Chapter 90 Maintenance 
funds wherein the Town supplied two thirds and the State one 
third of the cost of $3,000.00. Sections of Lowell Street Route 133 
and sections of River Road were armor-coated with RC-5 as- 
phalt and pea stone. Also a section of River Road was treated 
with tar T-6. The joints in the cement portions of Union Street 
and Haverhill Street were sealed with Genasco asphalt. 

Article 9 covered work accomplished with the aid of Chapter 90 
Construction funds, half of which was supplied by the State, one 
quarter by the County and one quarter by the Town. Main 
Street beginning at a point near the Post Office at the end of the 
section completed in 1949 and extending approximately twenty- 
four hundred feet to the junction of Chapel Avenue, School and 
Main Streets were resurfaced with a two-course hot-top Type I 
bituminous by Warren Brothers Roads Company using a total 
of 1954.15 tons costing $14,658.01 and at a net cost of $3,664.50 
to the Town. 

New sidewalks were constructed on the following streets under 
Article 11: Pasho Street, west side; Lincoln Street, east side from 
Shawsheen Road to residence of Francis Sparks; High Street, 
west side by the Veterans' homes; High Street, west side, near 
Harding Street; Brook Street on the north side; Central Street, 
east side from Essex Street to School Street ; and on the west side 
of River Street, Ballardvale. 

For this work 346 tons of hot top material were used. 

A walk was constructed across the Park, removing loam and 
filling in with gravel and topping with stone dust. Granolithic 
sidewalks in Shawsheen Village were patched where the slabs were 
uneven. 

The above construction and repair work cost $4,955.25. 

Under Article 12 with an appropriation of $2,500.00 a Ford 
tractor loader was purchased. Appurtenances included a material 
loader and bucket, a snow bucket, grader blade, snow plow and 
cab. 

The work of widening the roadway and acquisition of land on 
Chandler Road at Bourdelais', North Street at Bateman's was 
performed under Articles 14 and 15, and cost $448.05 and $241.97 
respectively. 

Stevens Street from No. 27 to Cassimere Street for a distance 

168 



of 800 feet on the northwest side was widened to a width of 26 
feet. This work involved the resetting of curbing the entire dis- 
tance. The appropriation of $2,500.00 was set up under Article 
16 and the cost was $1,787:66. 

The entire wood sections of the Andover Street Bridge in 
Ballardvale were replaced and treated with a wood preservative 
and all metal work was given two coats of paint. Reinforcing 
plates were welded on at all four ends of the superstructure. U- 
bolt hangers supporting the flooring of the bridge were installed 
in the previous year. The appropriation of $6,250.00 was raised 
under Article 19 in 1949 and the final cost was $5,269.67. 

The embankment on the Greene property on Dascomb Road 
was planted with Scotch Pines and shrubbery. Slope rights were 
acquired for $250.00 and the cost of trees, shrubs and planting 
was $224.50. This work was done under Article 54 of 1949, 

A small wooden bridge on Woburn Street was replaced with 
a 30" reinforced concrete culvert pipe at a cost of $243.72. 

To provide for adequate Highway Maintenance for 1951, we 
recommend an appropriation of $59,089.77. 

TRUCKS, GARAGE AND REPAIR SHOP MAINTENANCE 

To provide for adequate Trucks, Garage and Repair Shop 
Maintenance for 1951, we recommend an appropriation of $12,- 
500.00. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

At the Town Meeting in March under Article 1 on a supple- 
mentary warrant, $15,000.00 was appropriated for the purpose of 
installing pumping equipment in the Haggetts Pond Station. 
After contracts had been let the only work performed in 1950 
was the removal of an old foundation and the expenditures for 
the year amounted to $697.75. 

An appropriation of $34,500.00 was made under Article 18 and 
this amount together with the sum of $6,500.00 from Article 24 
in 1948 Warrant is to be expended for the purpose of improving 
and enlarging certain facilities of the water system, namely, 
pump, controls and necessary piping at the High Service Pump- 
ing Station; cleaning and relining the present force main from 
this station to the High Service reservoir and cleaning and re- 

L69 



lining small portions of the High Service mains. The cost of 
cleaning and relining the force main to the reservoir was $15,- 
365.47 and relining of the six-inch line on Salem Street from Holt 
Road to Highland Road cost $3,632.79. The cost to date on the 
pumping facilities at the Bancroft Road Station is $1,138.92 
leaving a balance of $20,862.82 from the two articles. 

Under Article 21, $20,000.00 was appropriated for the purpose 
of extending and improving the water system. All work was to 
proceed with the joint approval of the Board of Selectmen, the 
Finance Committee and the Board of Public Works. 

Location 
Abbot Street 
Gray Road 
Flint Circle 
Love joy Road 
Vine Street 
Woodland Road 



Total 



Also, 480 feet of 6" pipe has been placed on Sunset Rock Road 
in preparation for installation there connecting two dead ends. 

An additional 489 feet of six inch and 478 feet of eight inch 
water pipe was purchased under this article. Also, a certain 
amount of hydrants and valves have been ordered for 1951 de- 
livery. The cost to date is $13,065.57. 

Other installations by private interests were: 



Size 


Length 


6" 


527 Ft. 


6" 


223 " 


6" 


398 " 


6" 


1200 " 


8" 


143 " 


6" 


1113 " 




3604 Ft. 



Location 


Size 


Length 


Alden Road 


6" 


274 Ft, 


Memorial Circle 


6" 


753 " 


Sutherland Street 


6" 


188 " 



Total 1215 Ft. 

During 1950, 546,313,000 gallons of water were pumped at the 
Haggetts Pond Pumping Station for a daily average of 1,496,750 
gallons. The steam turbine was in operation 3960 hours, 55 min- 
utes and the electric pump 2803 hours. Both units were in opera- 
tion concurrently a great portion of the time. 

170 



u, 

<v 

a 

V 

Q 

ojo 
C 

C 



< 



C/3 



w 

c/] 

W 



Miles 

Main 
Pipe 


OOOt>NNO>OOOOOON 


aoooo^ooooo^OH 
t^ooooooxoooooooo^a 




00 ON «— i «— ' CN iO lo 00,0 O LO 

r^j>-r^j>.r^r^j>-t^i>.oooo 


No. of 
Meters 
in use 


lOOOOOt^-r^oOONO'— < 


No. of 
service 
pipes 
in use 




Annual Pumpage 
Haggetts Station 
(Million Gals.) 


<^t^^oocs<^!CS^tO'*ro 




Received 

per 

Million 

Gals. 


aro^OMOO'HNOO'* 


4^ 


to 

a 


T3 8 






"3 8 


O 00 -h u~; r}< r^j 00 IC CN ■* 't 


^ ,_, T-* ^ 


Direct 

Cost of 

Pumping 




O^'H^OOOOOt^O'^O 
tCC^'-^OOiO'— irOOO't'OrH 

Lo"r^"oo"o^o *— ' <M o^o~o~ o" 


Net Cost 

of Maint. 

incl. pumping 


OOOOfCNiOi^fCONXCN 


l^NOO'^O'-'MCNaO't 

r^T r--~ ©~ PC oo" ro r-T t-~ oC oo~ oC 


Received 
from Water 

Rates 


r)<M^ , OiO' y 500O'tr^M 


^ tN C\ h CMN J> O M ^ "-i 
^i O ") ^ MN O t> N rH |^. 

rvj i-. r^ oo © O ^.^'* O 00 
p,J k'io'i r, r^\ ~+ ©" Q\ «N rt«~ l^T 
i/-> >0 'O ""/ O to O iO O O O 
CO 




3 

s 


* 

C ^h M rr ^ ir, c 1- X ^ C 



171 



To provide for adequate expenditure in the Water Department 
during 1951, we recommend an appropriation of $52,600.00. 
Services in use January 1, 1951 3202 

Meters in use January 1, 1951 3172 

RECEIPTS 

Water Rates -$67,871 .62 

Water Services and Miscellaneous - 720.68 



Paid to Town Treasurer $68,592 . 30 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 

No sewer main installations by the Department were made in 
1950. Refer to the Engineer's Report for private work and other 
information. 

To provide for adequate Sewer Maintenance for 1951, we re- 
commend an appropriation of $6,950.00. 

SEWER MAINS 

COST OF CONSTRUCTION 
Sewer Mains — 109,620 Ft. 
Cost to Abutters $221,058.00 

Jan. 1, 1951 
Cost to Town 407,252.00 



Total $628,310.00 

PARK DEPARTMENT 

Poles and wire forming a backstop at the baseball diamond 
were removed and replaced by a more permanent and smaller one. 

The portable bleachers which are located each year on the east 
side of the football field were painted. 

At the Ballardvale playgrounds an area 90' x 60' was prepared 
for ice skating. This area is suitable for summer play as well, such 
as roller skating. A gravel base was prepared and finished with a 
two-course asphalt surface. This work was performed under 
Article 30 at a cost of $2,153.25. 

172 



A steel flagpole was erected at the north end of the football 
field. The pipe, rope and some cement was supplied by the 
Boosters' Committee, and the work of constructing the pole, 
painting, excavation and cement work was performed by the 
Board of Public Works. The Fire Department ably assisted in the 
erection in time for the dedication held on Thanksgiving Day. 

To provide for adequate Park Maintenance for 1951, we recom- 
mend an appropriation of $6,500.00. 

ADMINISTRATIVE, SUPERVISION AND OFFICE 

EXPENSE 
To provide for adequate expense for this Department for 1951, 
we recommend an appropriation of $17,800.00. 



STREET LIGHTING 

Annual Cost for Lights Installed January 1, 1950 



Lighting Changes During 1950 
Date Location 

1/9/50 North Street 
1/9/50 River Road 
1/16/50 North Main Street 



1/20/50 Andover Street 

1/21/50 Summer Street 
1/23/50 Summer Street 
1/23/50 Beacon Street 
1/23/50 Summer Street 
2/13/50 Boston Road 
3/1/50 Lowell Street 
4/7/50 Summer Street 

11/6/50 Main Street 



Lights 

1000 L. In 

1000 L. In 

2500 L.UG Out 

16,000 L.MV In 
1—2500 L. In 
2—2500 L. Out 
3—1000 L. Out 
1—1000 L. In 
3—1000 L. In 
2—1000 L. In 
2—1000 L. Out 
1—1000 L. In 
3—2500 L. In 
1—1000 L. In 
1—2500 L. UG Out 



x l— 1000 L. UG Out 
11/9/50 Main Street 2—16,000 L. MV UG In 
11/13/50 Main Street 2—2500 L. UG Out 

11/14/50 Lowell Street 6—1000 L. In 

11/16/50 Main Street 2—16,000 L. MV UG In 



#22,336.00 

Annual Cost 

to Town 
$162.00 

54.00 
-96.00 Credit 
380.00 

28.00 
-56.00 Credit 
-54.00 Credit 

18.00 

54.00 

36.00 
-36.00 Credit 

18.00 

84.00 

18.00 
-48.00 Credit 
-38.00 Credit 
230.00 

-96.00 Credit 
108.00 
230.00 



Annual Cost for Lights Installed During 1950 $996.00 

173 



Lights Pending Installation 



Dale Street, Ballardvale 


1—1000 L. 


$18.00 


River Road 


14—1000 L. 


252.00 


Woburn Street 


4—1000 L. 


72.00 


Ballardvale Road 


1—1000 L. 


18.00 


Wild wood Road 


1—1000 L. 


18.00 



Total Cost for Lights Pending $378.00 

TOTAL REQUIRED FOR 1951 STREET LIGHTING 

BUDGET TO COVER ABOVE $23,710.00 

To provide for adequate Street Lighting for 1951, we recom- 
mend an appropriation of $24,000.00. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edward R. Lawsox, Superintendent 



174 



Engineer's Report 



To the Board of Public Works: 
Gentlemen : 

The fourth annual report of the Engineering Department, 
covering the calendar year 1950, is hereby respectfully submitted 
for your consideration. 

As in the past, engineering services and advice have been 
furnished to the various departments and boards of the Town 
when such assistance has been requested. 

At the request of the Selectmen the Veterans Housing Sub- 
division on High Street was revised so that Lot 11 could be re- 
duced in area and a new lot, Lot 14, created. These changes were 
recorded in the Registry of Deeds. 

A survey and study was made at the Town Infirmary on Car- 
mel Road with a view toward improving a poor drainage condi- 
tion there, and in August a system of gutters and curbs was con- 
structed to direct and control the rain water run-off in that area. 

A survey and approval plan was made for parking meter loca- 
tions on Punchard Avenue, on both sides from Main Street to 
Bartlet Street. 

During the month of September the town scales were acci- 
dentally damaged. After a structural investigation to determine 
the extent of the damage, specifications were prepared for com- 
petitive bids and the low bidder cleaned and painted all the steel 
framing in the scale pit, placed new platform beams, and con- 
structed a new timber platform. 

At the request of the School Building Committee a plan of the 
Central School Area was prepared showing the location of all 
buildings and the utility services to them. This plan was used by 
the Committee's architect in his preliminary planning and loca- 
tion studies for proposed buildings in the area. 

Assistance was also given to the Andover Housing Authority 
for their sewer and water construction work at their project on 
Morton Street; to the School Committee for the reconstruction 
of the Bradlee School driveway and for the setting of a steel flag- 
pole at the Playstead; and to the Recreation Committee for the 
planning and construction of a paved skating area at the Ballard- 

175 



vale Playground. This latter project was performed jointly by 
the Board of Public Works forces which did the excavation, 
grading and drainage, and the Atlantic Paving Company of Pea- 
body, which company applied the hot top surfacing and curbs in 
October. 

Information and assistance has been furnished from time to 
time to all engineers, surveyors, contractors and property owners 
who have called upon this department. The more common re- 
quests concern street line location, water service and main loca- 
tion, and sewer location and elevation. 

A steady effort has been made to maintain and improve the 
office records, altho with the work load of outside construction 
and special projects it has not been possible to accomplish as 
much in this direction as your engineer would desire. Several old 
and inexact sewer record plans have been replotted, and all 
finished sewer record plans are now indexed and filed. A goodly 
portion of the current year's new water service locations have been 
entered in record notebooks; but there remain many more to 
enter at an early date. It is most urgent that the street index of 
services be brought up-to-date. This index has not been revised 
since it was originally made in about 1939, and altho efforts have 
been made to keep the intown changes up-to-date, the rapid 
growth of certain outlying sections make a revision necessary. 
This work will be of major proportions and will require the ser- 
vices of at least two men in the field for about two weeks, as well 
as clerical work in the office. 

A study of the water rates in Andover has been started and a 
check into the costs of delivering water to the ultimate user is 
nearly completed. During the coming year figures will be pre- 
sented to the Board for their consideration in regard to the ad- 
visability of revising the present water rates. 

A list of minimum standards of construction on private ways 
that are planned for acceptance has been prepared for the Board's 
consideration. Since the Board has to pass on every such way 
before the Town will accept it, a set of such minimum standards 
should prove most helpful to real estate developers and contractors. 
When adopted by the Board, such a list will serve to describe 
exactly the quality of construction that is to be expected before 
public acceptance will be recommended. 

The large town map at the scale of one inch equals eight hund- 

176 



red feet has been revised and brought up-to-date as of December 
1950. This is the first revision of this map since 1942. While the 
master tracing of this map is not the property of the Town, recent 
demands of the Civil Defense program were deemed to be of 
sufficient urgency to warrant the Engineering Department's co- 
operation with Clinton F. Goodwin of Haverhill, Mass. toward 
obtaining an up-to-date map. 

During the latter part of the year a Department of Civil De- 
fense was formed in Andover in accordance with a law of the 
General Court. In common with other town officials, your 
engineer has been assigned certain duties in the Civil Defense 
organization. Up to the end of the current year the demands of 
these duties have been negligible. However, it is generally ex- 
pected that during the coming year the program will expand 
rapidly and take up more of the time of those persons connected 
with the organization. 

HIGHWAYS 

Lines and grades were furnished for the widening of Central 
Street on the north side from Lupine Road easterly for a distance 
of 950 feet. Granite edgestone was set thruout this length and the 
average widening was about six feet. 

Prior to Town Meeting, land.taking plans were prepared for 
highway work on Chandler Road, North Street and on Argilla 
Road and budget articles prepared for this work. The first two 
listed jobs received the approval of the Town Meeting and the 
work on them was done during the Summer. A curve on Chandler 
Road at Octave Bourdelais' was widened ten feet for a distance of 
245 feet. A parcel of land 1920 sq. ft. in area was acquired here to 
allow for cutting back the slope to improve the sight distance. 
A curve on North Street at land of Agnes V. Bateman was widened 
ten feet for a distance of 144 feet. A parcel of land 1120 sq. ft. in 
area was acquired here to allow for cutting back the slope to im- 
prove the sight distance. 

On the westerly side of Stevens Street from No. 27 to Cassi- 
mere Street the existing edgestones were set back for a distance 
of six feet and the widened roadway repaved. The finished road- 
way in this section is now 2 6 feet wide between curbs except for 
a short section near Cas^imere Street which is 23 feet wide. 
This work was done in September. 

177 



Lines and grades were furnished on North Main Street for the 
raising of sewer and water structures. The State Department of 
Public Works resurfaced North Main Street from Stimson's 
Bridge to the Lawrence City Line with 2^ inches of hot top. 
This work was done during July and August. 

Lines and grades were furnished on Main Street for the raising 
of sewer and water structures. During the first week of August 
the Board of Public Works resurfaced Main Street from the Post 
Office to Chapel Avenue with 23^ inches of hot top. The entire 
length of Route 28 in Andover is now paved with a high type 
surface except that section thru the Phillips Academy Campus. 

Line and grades were furnished for the sidewalk construction 
program carried on in the latter part of the year. The two princi- 
pal jobs requiring field work were those on High Street along the 
Veterans' Housing Subdivision and on River Street, Ballardvale, 
where the sidewalk was extended. 

A new culvert was installed on Abbot Street at a point about 
420 feet north of Porter Road to replace an old corrugated metal 
culvert pipe. Two pieces of condemned 16" cast iron water pipe 
were used for this. 

Estimates were prepared for the 1951 Chapter 90 Program and 
on October 19th I attended the annual hearing at Salem, Mass. 
with Superintendent Lawson. Work requested consisted of the 
paving of Haverhill Street with hot top from the B. & M. R. R. 
Overpass to High Street, the reconstruction of Lowell Street at 
Argilla Road, the widening and surfacing of River Road near 
Jacobson's and the usual amount of Chapter 90 Maintenance 
Work. The total estimated value of work requested was $37,- 
500.00. 

A survey was made for the purpose of studying the possible 
widening of Shawsheen Road from Cuba Street to Stevens 
Street and a survey was made for the purpose of studying the 
possibility of lowering the grade of the roadway on Chandler 
Road where it crosses the abandoned B. & M. R. R. near Fred 
Doyle's home. 

During July and August two construction projects which in- 
directly affect the Town were completed in Ballardvale. The 
B. & M. R. R. reconstructed its grade crossing there, dividing 
the old single crossing into separate crossings for Andover Street 
and for Tewksbury Street. Additional drainage was installed and 

178 



the surfacing of the approaches greatly improved. At this time 
automatic crossing gates were installed to replace the old manual 
gates, and the crossing tender's shanty and the Ballardvale 
Depot were removed. 

The American Woolen Company and other interested con- 
cerns repaired the Shawsheen River Dam at Ballardvale. This 
dam had fallen into a bad state of repair and leaked quite ex- 
tensively. A new spillway bridge was constructed, new flash 
boards installed, and the leaks thru the body of the dam were 
plugged. 

BRIDGES 

The open deck bridges on Stevens Street and on Central Street 
were inspected twice during the past year and found to be in 
good condition. At the end of the sanding season both bridges 
were flushed down with water to remove any sand and salt 
which may have lodged on horizontal surfaces. 

By the middle of the coming year both bridges will be two 
years old and it is felt that it would be good maintenance to start 
painting these bridges at regular intervals. Therefore it is recom- 
mended that the Central Street Bridge be painted during the 
year 1951 and that the Stevens Street Bridge be painted during 
the year 1952. 

A small wooden bridge on Woburn Street was replaced on July 
5th and 6th. The timber flooring on this bridge was in poor condi- 
tion and required continual maintenance. A reinforced concrete 
pipe culvert 42" in diameter and 28 feet long was laid within the 
abutments of the old bridge, headwalls constructed at the ends, 
and the whole back-filled with gravel and paved. 

In August the flooring of the Andover Street Bridge over the 
Shawsheen River in Ballardvale began to break up badly, and 
upon a thorough investigation of the abutment ends of the 
stringers it was found that these were rotted and ready to fail. 
It was therefore decided to renew completely the entire timber 
floor system of this bridge and to paint the structural metal of 
the bridge. Accordingly, the bridge was closed to traffic, the tim- 
ber flooring and sidewalks were removed, the bridge seats were 
trued up and reconcreted, new stringers and sub-flooring of long 
leaf yellow pine were installed, and a wearing floor and sidewalk 
of fir were installed. The top surface of all stringers and floor 

179 



planks was painted with a decay retarding compound. All metal 
work on the bridge was brushed, scraped, and given a spot coat of 
red lead followed by two coats of Kings No. 7 Sage Green paint. 
All of this work, together with the reinforcing of the U-bolt floor 
beam hangers and the reinforcing of the end posts, places this 
bridge in as good a condition as possible short of major structural 
changes. This bridge could be safely rated for an 8-ton load ; but 
due to its age of about 76 years, and the tendency for trucks to 
exceed posted load limits it is felt that 6 tons is a safer limit for 
this structure and it is so posted. 

Despite the repair work done on this bridge this year, which 
was absolutely necessary in order that the bridge be kept in use, 
it is still felt that the structure has outlived its useful life and 
should be replaced by a new and stronger bridge more in keeping 
with present day truck loadings. 

WATER SYSTEM 

Record drawings and sketches, showing the location and extent 
of water mains constructed and house services installed during 
the year, were made for the permanent files. 

Assistance has been furnished to the Water Department in lo- 
cating gate valves, mains, and services, for repair or maintenance 
work. 

A reconnaissance survey and location study was made for a pro- 
posed 12-inch force main thru the West Campus of Phillips 
Academy from Phillips Street to Hidden Road. A tentative agree- 
ment for an easement was made with the Trustees of the Academy 
and a more definite agreement may easily be prepared when it 
becomes advisable to construct this main. 

A field survey was made and a taking plan prepared of land off 
Bancroft Road owned by George J. and Melrena Flathers. This 
land was proposed as the site of a new 6 million gallon distribu- 
tion reservoir. No action was taken on this landtaking after the 
proposal to construct a new reservoir w T as defeated in the Town 
Meeting. 

Preliminary studies and rough sketches were prepared for a 
six million gallon earth embankment open reservoir adjacent to 
the present Bancroft Road reservoir. This project was not put 
into execution. 

During the course of checking ownerships and making land 

180 



surveys for the proposed reservoir it was discovered that there is a 
case of trespass on town land just southeast of the Low Service 
Reservoir. Because of a conflict in deeds, the abuttor feels that he 
is rightfully occupying his own land. After a friendly conference 
with the abuttor, your engineer placed all the pertinent data in 
the hands of the Town Counsel and at the present time is awaiting 
an opinion as to which owner has the legal right to the land in 
question. 

Preliminary studies, contract drawings and specifications were 
prepared for the installation of a new electric driven centrifugal 
pump for Haggetts Pond Station. The work was divided into two 
sections and after advertising and receiving competitive bids, 
the low bidder on each phase of the work was awarded a contract. 

In order that the new pumping unit may be installed in the 
present building it was necessary to remove part of the existing 
operating floor, remove a large section of brick and granite mason- 
ry which was part of the foundation for one of the old vertical 
pumping engines long since removed, reinforce the remaining 
portion of the operating floor, and construct a pipe guard rail 
around the new opening in the floor. The contract for this work in 
the amount of $720.00 was awarded to the John Simensen Con- 
struction Co., Inc., of Wakefield, Mass. on July 31, 1950, work 
was started on August 1st and was completed on August 14th 
with the exception of a small quantity of floor paving, which is to 
be completed after the new equipment is installed. 

A contract for furnishing and installing a new 2500 G.P.M. 
electric motor driven centrifugal pumping unit with piping and 
motor controls was awarded to the R. H. White Construction Co. 
of Auburn, Mass. on August 8th. The amount of this contract 
was $12,374.00. 

No work was done under this contract in 1950 due to the 
length of time required to assemble the materials and equipment. 
It is expected that this contract will be completed in February 
of 1951 and that the pump will be ready to handle the heavy 
Summer pumping load. 

Preliminary studies, contract drawings and specifications were 
prepared for the installation of a new dual-driven centrifugal 
pump for Bancroft Road Station. After advertising and receiving 
competitive bids a contract was awarded to the Starkweather 
Engineering Co., Inc. of Newtonville, Mass. on September ISth. 

181 



in the amount of $7,671.00. The work involved under this con- 
tract consists of removing the old original semi-diesel engine and 
triplex pump, altering and patching the existing concrete floor, 
furnishing and installing one gasoline and electric dual-driven 
500 G.P.M. centrifugal pumping unit, necessary piping, electric 
controls, Venturi meter and register, and an auxiliary gasoline 
storage system and waste water drainage system. The Board has 
purchased, and will install under a separate work order, one 
Bristol metameter which is to be connected to the High Service 
Reservoir and which will control the operation of the new pump- 
ing unit. 

Materials and equipment have not been delivered for this proj- 
ect and are not expected until late in January 1951. The work 
performed this year has consisted of the removal of the semi- 
diesel engine and triplex pump together with its suction and 
discharge pipe. This was done in December. 

On June 19th it was necessary to renew the bearings on the 
thrust and of the electric pump at Bancroft Road Station. 

On May 5th the Board entered into a unit price contract with 
the Tate Pipe Linings, Inc. of Andover, Mass. for the cleaning and 
lining of the High Service force main from Bancroft Road Station 
to the High Service Reservoir on Prospect Hill. Work started on 
May 9th at the gate outside Bancroft Station and followed the 
main on Bancroft Road to Holt Road, on Holt Road to Salem 
Street, on Salem Street to Prospect Hill Road, on Prospect Hill 
Road to the right-of-way on Prospect Hill, and on the right-of- 
way to the 10-inch gate outside the reservoir. 

Under the Tate system of lining it is necessary to expose the 
main at every gate valve, tee, bend and corporation cock and re- 
move these items as they form an obstruction to the lining ma- 
chine's operation. Sections of main not over 300 feet in length are 
scraped with various scarifying devices to remove the rust and 
tubercles in the main, then cleaned with rubber squeegees, and 
finally lined with a coating of cement grout about }/$ inch thick. 
Fittings, valves, etc. are cleaned and lined by hand methods. 
Lengths of main are cleaned by drawing the various scraping and 
lining tools thru by means of a cable. The finished lined pipe has a 
diameter of about 34 inch less than new pipe; but due to the 
smoothness of the cement lining the carrying capacity of the 
finished pipe is greater than new unlined cast iron pipe. Inspec- 

182 



tion can only be made from the open ends by means of a powerful 
spot-light; but since an excess of lining grout is used for each pull 
it is felt that all portions of the surface are thoroughly covered. 

The total length of the force main lined was 7830.3 ft. including 
128.0 ft. of 10-inch pipe at the reservoir end. The remainder was 
8-inch pipe. The total contract amount for this work was $14,- 
565.29, or an average cost per linear foot of $1.86, which is about 
35% of the cost of installing a new 8-inch main. 

Upon the satisfactory completion of the above work on July 
11th, the Board authorized the contractor to clean and line a 
section of 6-inch main on Salem Street from Holt Road to High- 
land Road. A contract was signed and work started on July 17th. 
Cleaning and lining was completed on August 2nd. 

The total length of this section of Salem Street was 1881 feet of 
6-inch pipe, and extended from the tee at Holt Road to the tee at 
Highland Road and 45 ft. across Salem Street to a gate on High- 
land Road. The total contract amount for this portion of the work 
was $3354.10, or an average cost per linear foot of $1.78. 

The High Service Reservoir on Prospect Hill was drained and 
thoroughly cleaned on July 13th. The telemeter line to this reser- 
voir was checked and found to be satisfactory. 

In December the telemeter and power line to the Low Service 
Reservoir was checked and repaired. Several new cross arms and 
insulators were installed. This work was necessary because of 
damage sustained in the storm of November 25th. 

This storm was in the form of high winds and heavy rains and 
was the most damaging storm in this area since the hurricane of 
'September 1938. Many trees and wires were blown down and 
2.4 inches of rain fell in ten hours. Power and light circuits were 
out for several hours at both pumping stations, and it was neces- 
sary to set up a mobile gasoline driven pump at Bancroft Station 
for part of one day. 

The level of the water surface at Haggetts Pond was at its low- 
est during this year on November 20th when it was 72.5 inches 
below elevation 117.65, which is considered full pond. This is the 
lowest point the pond has reached in the history of available 
records and reflects the cumulative demand of two years which 
have been abnormally dry in all of New England. During extreme 
dry weather such as we have experienced for the past two years 
the average daily yield of Haggetts Pond has been 1.15 million 

183 



gallons. The daily average demand for the year 1950 has been on 
the order of 1.5 million gallons necessitating a constant reduction 
of the available storage. 

On the first day of the year the pond was at elevation 112.90 
and on the last day of the year it was at elevation 112.57. This 
represents a net loss in storage of about 22 million gallons for the 
year. 

A gravel blanket was placed over the 20-inch suction line at the 
shore line in November. The approach of freezing weather coupled 
with the lack of water cover over this line made it necessary to 
furnish this added protection against freezing during the times 
when the suction line would not be in use. 

During the year 4819.5 linear feet of water main were added to 
the system both by town construction and private owner con- 
struction. This work is more fully described in the Superintend- 
ent's Report. 

SEWERAGE SYSTEM 

No new sewer construction was performed by the Town this 
year. 

A sewer in Shipman Road was constructed from a manhole in 
Elm Street northerly for a distance of 131.5 feet by Mr. Fred E. 
Cheever, the owner of the abutting land. All work was performed 
by Lewis and Scott, the contractor, working directly for Mr. 
Cheever. This sewer was constructed in August. 

Record plans for the following sewers were made, replotted, or 
finished, whichever was necessary to bring the sewer record files 
currently up-to-date: Pine Street both ends, Elm Street from 
Cheever Circle to Westwind Road; Topping Road; Franklin 
Avenue and R.O.W. to Topping Road; Chestnut Street upper 
end, and Morton Street from Chestnut Street to Memorial Circle. 

The original sewer assessment lists for Elm Street and Pine 
Street were reviewed, revised where necessary, and resubmitted 
to the Board of Assessors. 

The original sewer assessment lists for Burnham Road and 
Dufton Road were reviewed, revised where necessary, and re- 
submitted to the Board of Assessors. 

Sewer assessment lists were prepared for Topping Road and 
Franklin Avenue, filed at the Registry of Deeds and submitted to 
the Board of Assessors. 

184 



A sewer assessment list was prepared for upper Chestnut 
Street, filed at the Registry of Deeds and submitted to the Board 
of Assessors. 

A sewer assessment list was prepared for Morton Street and 
this list is pending approval by the Board. 

Locations, lines, and grades have been furnished from time to 
time to interested parties for the construction of sewer services to 
dwellings, commercial properties and new real estate develop- 
ments. 

Warren O. Petersen, Registered Professional Engineer 

Engineer for the Board of Public Works 
January 12, 1951 



185 



1951 Town Warrant 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, SS 

to either of the constables of the towx of axdover, 
Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to 
vote in Elections and Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the 
designated polling places in Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, 
Five, and Six, viz: The Central Fire Station in Precinct One; the 
Square and Compass Hall in Precinct Two; the Sacred Heart 
School, Balmoral Street, Shawsheen Village, in Precinct Three; 
the Andover Grange Hall in Precinct Four; the Fire Station, 
Ballardvale, in Precinct Five; and the Peabody House, Phillips 
Street, in Precinct Six, in said Andover on Monday, the fifth day 
of March, 1951 at 7:00 o'clock A.M., to act upon the following 
articles: 

Article 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, a Town Clerk 
for three years, a Selectman for three years, an Assessor for three 
years, two members of the Board of Public Works for three years, 
a member of the Board of Health for three years, a member of the 
School Committee for three years, a member of the Planning 
Board for five years, a Trustee of Memorial Hall Library for seven 
years, a member of Andover Housing Authority for five years, 
three Constables for one year, and all town officers required by 
law to be elected by ballot, also to vote on the following question: 

"Shall the town vote to accept the provisions of section nine- 
teen B. of Chapter forty-one of the General Laws and thereby 
provide permanent tenure for GEORGE H. WINSLOW, the 
present incumbent in the office of town clerk?" 

All the above candidates and question to be voted for on one 
ballot. The polls will be open from 7:00 o'clock A.M. to 7:00 
o'clock P.M. 

After final action on the preceding Article One, the said meeting 
shall stand adjourned by virtue of Section 20, Chapter 39 of the 

186 



General Laws, to Monday, March 12th at 7 :00 o'clock P.M. at the 
Memorial Auditorium, then and there to act upon the following 
articles, namely: 

Article 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to 
be elected by ballot. 

Article 3. To see what action should be taken as to the 
method of voting on articles in the warrantat this meeting, on the 
petition of John F. O'Connell and others. 

Article 4. To see if the town of Andover will vote to raise 
and appropriate, or transfer from available funds, the sum of 
$14,000.00 to constitute a general raise of ten dollars a week for 
all permanent full-time employees of the town of Andover, as re- 
ferred from Special Town Meeting, November 13, 1950. 

Article 5. To establish the salary of elected TOWN OF- 
FICERS for the ensuing year. 

Article 6. To determine what sums of money shall be ap- 
propriated for the following purposes : 

Appropriation for the Assessors, Board of Selectmen, and all 
Departments under their control : Appropriation for Tree Warden : 
Appropriation for the Board of Health : Appropriation for Trus- 
tees of Memorial Hall Library: Appropriation for Trustees of 
Spring Grove Cemetery: Appropriation for School Committee: 
Appropriation for all Departments under the control of the 
Board of Public Works: Appropriation for any other Town 
Charges and Expenses. 

Article 7. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropri- 
ate $1500.00 for the improvement of the "Shaw Property" at 85 
Main Street. 

Article 8. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to sell the barn now at the Town Infirmary on Carmel 
Road, the sale to be at such price and under such restrictions as 
the Selectmen deem advisable and to be at public auction or 
private sale. 

Article 9. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to sell two lots of land on the east side of Carmel 
Road and adjacent to and south of the lot on which the Infirmary 
garage is located, the sale to be at such price and under such re- 
strictions as the Selectmen deem advisable and to be at public 
auction or private sale. 

187 



Article 10. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropri- 
ate the sum of $1447.00 with the turn in of two 1950 Ford Sedans 
for two new automobiles for the Police Department. 

Article 11. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate $1300.00 to be used with the turn in value of the old car to 
purchase a new car for use of the Chief of the Fire Department. 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $2500.00 for the improvement of Lowell Street 
in the vicinity of Argilla Road; said money to be used in con- 
junction with any money which may be allotted by the State or 
County, or both, for this purpose, as referred from annual Town 
Meeting, March 13, 1950. 

Article 13. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the amount of $14,000.00 for the purpose of enclosing 
Rogers Brook in a buried culvert between the west line of Whit- 
tier Street and south line of Chestnut Street together with such 
regrading as may be necessary therefor, as referred from annual 
Town Meeting, March 13, 1950. 

Article 14. To see if the town will vote to purchase a parcel 
of land necessary for the relocation of a portion of Argilla Road 
at Lowell Street abutting land of Arthur Peatman, said parcel 
containing about 23,000 square feet or 0.53 acres, as shown on a 
plan on file at the office of the Town Clerk; and grade and pave 
said relocated portion of Argilla Road ; and raise and appropriate 
the amount of $4,700.00 for said land acquisition and roadway 
construction work, as referred from annual Town Meeting, 
March 13, 1950. 

Article 15. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or transfer from unappropriated available funds in the 
treasury, a sum of money for Chapter 90, Highway Maintenance, 
or take any action in relation thereto. 

Article 16. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the amount of $2875.00 for the improvement of Lowell 
Street in the vicinity of Argilla Road; said money to be used in 
conjunction with any money which may be allotted by the State 
or County or both for this purpose. 

Article 17. To see if the town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to repair and build sidewalks and raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $5,000.00 therefor. 

188 



Article 18. To see if the town will vote to purchase or seize 
by eminent domain: a parcel. of land necessary to reduce the cur- 
vature and widen the present roadway on the westerly side of' 
Shawsheen Road abutting land now or formerly of Wilfred Bou- 
cher for a distance of two hundred and eighty-one (281) feet, 
more or less, as shown on a plan on file at the office of the Town 
Clerk; and relocate the existing curbstones and widen the trav- 
eled way to thirty (30) feet from Cuba Street to a point about 
two hundred (200) feet west of Stevens Street; and raise and ap- 
propriate the amount of $4,500.00 for said land acquisition and 
construction work. 

Article 19. To see if the town will vote to purchase or seize 
by eminent domain certain parcels of land on Greenwood Road 
necessary to permit the widening and relocation of said road 
from Lowell Street northerly for a distance of about 2850 feet, 
said parcels being: (a) a parcel of land on the easterly side of 
Greenwood Road owned now or formerly by George H. and 
Mary D. Winslow, (b) a parcel of land on the westerly side of 
Greenwood Road owned now or formerly by Fred Kress, and (c) 
a parcel of land on the easterly side of Greenwood Road owned 
now or formerly by Frederick A. Higgins, all as shown on a plan 
on file at the office of the Town Clerk; and grade and re-surface 
said road as widened and relocated, and raise and appropriate the 
amount of $1,500.00 for said land acquisition and construction 
work. 

Article 20. To see if the town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to purchase a dump truck and raise and appropriate 
the sum of $4,200.00 therefor, and the price allowed for a Dia- 
mond T. truck purchased in 1939 be used as part payment for the 
new dump truck. 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $12,000.00 for the purpose of extending and 
improving the water system of the Town of Andover, all work to 
be done under the supervision of the Board of Public Works and 
no work to be started until approved by the Board of Selectmen, 
the Finance Committee and the Board of Public Works. 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the amount of $4,750.00 for the purpose of enclosing 
Rogers Brook in a buried culvert from the north end of the 
present culvert on Chestnut Street northerly for a distance of one 

189 



hundred and forty-one (141) feet, more or less, following the 
present brook bed on the common boundary line between land 
now or formerly of Edward M. Lindholm and land now or former- 
ly of Ralph W. Coleman. 

Article 23. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the amount of $1,000.00 for the acquisition of land, or land 
and buildings, on the watershed of Haggetts Pond and Fish 
Brook, for the purpose of protecting the source of water supply 
and increasing the available storage; said land, or land and build- 
ings, to be purchased by negotiated sale or seized by right of 
eminent domain upon the recommendation of the Board of Pub- 
lic Works and with the approval of the Town Counsel. 

Article 24. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $2,100.00 for the purpose of improving the 
lighting in the Reading Rooms of Memorial Hall Library through 
the installation of modern electric light fixtures. 

Article 25. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $750.00 plus the turn-in value of an old gasoline 
chain saw, for the purchase of a new 7 H.P. and a 3 to 4 H.P. 
chain saw for use in the Tree Department and for removal of 
trees under Dutch elm disease control work. 

Article 26. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $1300.00 plus the turn-in value'of an old tractor 
and mower, for the purchase of a new tractor with mower attach- 
ment for use in the Tree Department. 

Article 27. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $350.00 for the purpose of purchasing a power 
lawn roller for Spring Grove Cemetery. 

Article 28. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $500.00 to grade and surface the road into 
Pomp's Pond, this money to be expended under the supervision 
of the Board of Public Works and the Committee on Recreation. 

Article 29. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of S2500.00 to improve and resurface a portion of 
the Central Playground for year round recreational purposes, 
this money to be expended under the supervision of the Board of 
Public Works and the Committee on Recreation. 

Article 30. To see if the town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to extend the water main from the present dead end 
on Spring Grove Road a distance of 824 feet and appropriate the 

190 



sum of $4500.00 therefor, on petition of Pauline Johnston and 
others. 

Article 31. To see if the town will vote to accept as a public 
way and name Henderson Avenue, as approved June 2, 1950 by 
the Board of Survey, as shown on a plan entitled Acceptance 
Plan for Henderson Avenue, Andover, Mass., made by Ralph B. 
Brasseur, Civil Engineer, Haverhill, Mass. Both plan and de- 
scription referred to being on file at the office of the Town Clerk, 
on petition of Alexander H. Henderson and others. 

Article 32. To see if the town will vote to accept as a public 
way and name Memorial Circle, as approved by the Board of 
Survey and laid out by the Board of Selectmen, as shown on a 
plan entitled Subdivision & Acceptance Plan, Memorial Circle 
made April 1949 by Clinton F. Goodwin, Engineer, Haverhill, 
Mass. Both plan and description referred to being on file at the 
Town Clerk's office, on petition of the Andover Housing Authori- 
ty- 

Article 33. To see if the town will vote to accept an exten- 
sion of Lincoln Circle, from the present terminus, northeasterly 
thereof, as a public way, for a distance of three hundred linear 
feet, all as shown on a plan filed with the Town Clerk, entitled 
Acceptance plan for a Portion of Lincoln Circle, Andover, Mass., 
dated January, 1950, Fred W. Stowers, Registered Land Sur- 
veyor, on petition of George R. Cairns and others. 

Article 34. To see if the town will vote to accept the pro- 
visions of Chapter 820 of the Acts of 1950 which amends section 
89 and 89A of Chapter 32 of the General Laws: an act providing 
.for an increase in the annual amounts of certain pensions, retire- 
ment allowances, annuities and other benefits payable by the 
town of Andover to certain former employees and persons claim- 
ing under them. 

Article 35. To see if the town will vote to accept the pro- 
visions of Chapter 783 of the Acts of 1950 which amends section 
25 of Chapter 32 of the General Laws as appearing in section 1 of 
Chapter 658 of the acts of 1945: an act making applicable in- 
creases in retirement allowances to those persons retired after 
January 1, 1946 with a minimum allowance. 

Article 36. To see if the town will adopt the following by- 
law: "After a motion has been made and seconded on an article in 
the Town Warrant, a motion made and seconded to vote on the 

191 



article by ballot shall be in order. If such motion is passed by a 
majority of the voters present and voting, ballots approved by 
the Moderator as to form shall be used" on petition of John F. 
O'Connell, and others. 

Article 37. To see if the town will vote to accept $3018.00 
received in 1950, for the perpetual care of lots in Spring Grove 
Cemetery, and $10.00 additional for a flower fund, on petition of 
Thaxter Eaton, Treasurer. 

Article 38. To determine what disposition shall be made of 
unexpended appropriations and free cash in the treasury. 

Article 39. To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 

Article 40. To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting: 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested 
copies and publication thereof, seven days at least before the 
time and place of said meeting as directed by the By-Laws of the 
town. 

Hereof fail not, and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon, at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this Fifth day of February, A.D. 1951. 

Roy E. Hardy 

J. Everett Collins 

Sidney P. White 

Selectmen of Andover 



192 



TOWN OF 

ANDOVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 




ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

TOWN OFFICERS 



For the Fiscal Year Ending 
DECEMBER 31, 1951 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Accounting Taxes and Assessments 76 

Aid to Dependent Children 57 

Animal Inspector 44 

Appropriations for 1951 37 

Armistice Day 70 

Assessors 43, .105 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 77 

Municipal Properties and Public 

Improvements 1 06 

Balance Sheet 92 

Board of Appeals 116 

Board of Health 51, 128 

Board of Public Welfare 57, 107 

Aid to Dependent Children 57 

Infirmary 59, 123 

Old Age Assistance 58 

Veterans' Services 60. Ill 

Board of Public Works 158 

Accounts Receivable 81 

Administrative and Office 66 

Assessments and Receipts 78 

Highways 52 

Sewers 52 

Sidewalks 54 

Snow Removal and Sanding 56 

Superintendent's Report 159 

Town Engineer 168 

Trucks, Garage and Repair Shop 53 

Water Maint. and Construction 72 

Bonds. Redemption of See Town Debt 

Building Inspector 48,131 



Cemetery Funds 
Civilian Defense 



86 
41. 138 



Damages to Persons and Property 69 
Departmental Accounts Receivable 81 
Director of Accounts 32 

Dog Officer 44 

Election and Registration 45 

Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital 51 
Expenditures for 1951 41 

Finance Committee 44 

Fire Department 47, 125 

Forest Fires 50 



PAGE 

General Government 

Election and Registration 45 

Municipal Buildings 45 

Town Officers 4 



Highways 52 

Housing Authority 113 

History of Andover 49 

Insurance 70 

Interest 75 

Jury List 142 

Maturing Debt 75 

Memorial Day 71 

Memorial HaU Library 65, 91, 147 

Library Statistics 156 

Report of Librarian 148 

Trustees 147 

Milk Inspector 129 

Moderator 43 

Moth Suppression 49, 136 

Motor Vehicles Excise Tax 

Municipal Buildings 45 

Municipal Properties and Publ 

Improvements 



Old Age Assistance 
Overlay 

Parking Meters 

Parks and Playgrounds 

Planning Board 

Police Department 

Public Dump 

Punchard Athletic Association 



106 

58 
83 

68 
66 
, 118 
46, 126 
52 
65 



46, 

45. 



Receipts for 1951 37 

Recreation Committee 67, 120 

Reserve Fund 76 

Retirement Report 101 

*School Department 61 

School Lunch 64 

Sealer, Weights and Measures 48, 133 

Selectmen 41 

Sewers 52 

Assessments 78 

Snow Removal and Sanding 56 

*Also see School Report 



PAGE 



PAGE 



Spring Grove Cemetery 
Street Lighting 



74, 109 
57 



Tax Collector 42, 103 

Summary of Tax Collector's Cash 

Account 1 04 

Tax Title Account 76 

Town Accountant 36, 42 

Accounting Taxes and Assessments 

76 
Appropriations for 1951 37 

Balance Sheet 92 

Board of Public Works Accounts 

Receivable 8 i 

Departmental Accounts Receivable 

81 
Director of Accounts 32 

Expenditures for 1951 41 

John Cornell Fund 84 

Maturing Debt 75 

Overlay 83 

Receipts for 1951 37 

Reserve Fund 76 

Surplus Revenue 84 

Town Debt 100 

*Trustees of Punchard Free School 

88 
Water Accounts Receivable 81 



Town Clerk 
Town Counsel 
Town Debt 
Town Infirmary 
Town Meetings 

Proceedings 

Special 

Warrants 

Town Officers 

Town Reports 

Town Scales 

Treasurer 

Tree Warden 

Trust Funds 

*Trustees of Punchard Free School 



Veterans' Quarters 
Veterans' Services 
Vital Statistics 



Water Accounts Receivable 81 

Water Maint. and Construction 72 
Wire Inspector 48, 132 



31 


, 43 




44 




100 


59, 


123 




14 




28 


9, 


178 




4 




71 




71 


42, 


102 


50, 


134 




87 


;hoc 


1 88 


6S 


>, 70 


60, 


111 




31 



•Also see School Report 



Town Officers 



ELECTED AND APPOINTED 



Moderator 
Arthur Sweeney 

Board of Selectmen and Public Welfare 
Roy E. Hardy, Chairman Term expires 1954 

J. Everett Collins, Secretary Term expires 1953 

Sidney P. White Term expires 1952 

George H. Winslow, Clerk 
Arthur W. Cole, Agent, Bureau, Old Age Assistance, Welfare 

Board 
Francis P. Markey, Veterans' Affairs Agent 



Board of Assesors 
Roy E. Hardy, Chairman 
J. Everett Collins 
Sidnev P. White 



Term expires 1954 
Term expires 1953 
Term expires 1952 



George H. Winslow 



Towx Clerk 



Term, Tenure 



James P. Christie 



Collector of Taxes 



Term expires 1952 



Treasurer 



Thaxter Eaton 

Town Accountant 
George C. Napier 



Term expires 1953 

Town Counsel 
Walter C. Tomlinson 



Board of Retirement 

George C. Napier, Chairman Term expires 1952 

Edmond E. Hammond Term expires 1952 

David L. Nicoll, Secretary Term expires 1953 

4 



Board of Public Works 
Sidney P. White, Chairman 
P. Leroy Wilson 
Victor J. Mill, Jr. 
John H. Kelly 

Alexander H. Henderson, Secretary 
Warren 0. Petersen, Town Engineer 
Edward R. Lawson, Superintendent 

School Committee 
Dorothy T. Partridge 
Anna M. Greeley 
Katherine A. Baldwin 
William A. Doherty, Secretary 
Gordon C. Colquhoun, Chairman 
Kenneth L. Sherman, Superintendent 



Term expires 1953 
Term expires 1954 
Term expires 1954 
Term expires 1952 
Term expires 1952 



Term expires 1953 
Term expires 1953 
Term expires 1952 
Term expires 1952 
Term expires 1954 



School Building Committee 

C. Carleton Kimball, Chairman Kenneth L. Sherman, Secretary 

Herbert P. Carter Harold T. Houston Roy E. Hardy 

Gordon L. Colquhoun Stanley F. Swanton 



Attendance Officer 
John Campbell 

Athletic Medical Director 
John J. McArdle, Jr., M. D. 



School Physician 
Philip W. Blake, M. D. 

School Nurse 
Ruth E. Westcott, R. N. 



Director, Continuation School 
Carl M. Gahan 



Board of Health 
Percy J. Look, M. D., Chairman * 
Philip W. Blake, M. D. 
Charles 0. McCullom 
William V. Emmons 
Lotta M. Johnson, R. N., Nurse and Agent 
Robert A. Walsh, Milk Inspector 

Inspector of Slaughtering 
Ray S. Youmans 



Term expires 1952 
Term expires 1952 
Term expires 1954 
Term expires 1953 



•Deceased 



Inspector of Buildings Inspector of Plumbing 

Ralph W. Coleman Alexander Thomson 

Planning Board and Board of Survey 
Sidney P. White, Chairman Term expires 1952 

Leon A. Field Term expires 1953 

Walter Tomlinson Term expires 1954 

Frederick E. Cheever Term expires 1955 

Kirk R. Batcheller Term expires 1956 

Inspector of Wires Sealer of Weights and Measures 

William J. Young Joseph Serio 

Wilson Crawford, Deputy 

Inspector of Animals 
Hartwell B. Abbot 

Trustees of Memorial Hall Library 

Winsor Gale, Chairman # Term expires 1955 

Joseph Serio Term expires 1952 

Arthur W. Reynolds, Treasurer Term expires 1957 

William N. Perry, Secretary Term expires 1954 

Ernest D. Walen Term expires 1958 

Leo F. Daley Term expires 1952 

Alan R. Blaekmer Term expires 1953 

Caroline P. Leavitt Term expires 1956 

Trustees of Punchard Free School 
Rev. Frederick B. [Noss, President 
Rev. John S. Moses 
Rev. John G. Gaskill 

Edmond E. Hammond, Clerk and Treasurer Term expires 1952 

Fred W. Doyle Term expires 1952 

Roy E. Hardy Term expires 1952 

Harry Sellars Term expires 1952 

C. Carleton Kimball Term expires 1952 

Trustees of Cornell Fund t 

Edward P. Hall Term expires 1953 

Arthur W. Cole Term expires 1954 

Frederick E. Cheever, Treasurer Term expires 1952 

#Resigned 

6 



Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery 



Frank R. Petty, Chairman 

Malcolm E. Lundgren 

Albert E. Curtis 

Clifford E. Marshall 

Frederick E. Cheever 

Jesse E. West, Superintendent * 

Nelson E. Townsend, Superintendent 

Board of Registrars 
Ralph A. Bailey, Chairman 
Walter F. McDonald 
Eugene A. Zalla 
George H. Winslow, Clerk 

Finance Committee 
Louis E. Gleason, Chairman 
Harold G. Bowen, Secretary 
Stanley F. S want on 
Charles W. Arnold 



Term expires 1954 
Term expires 1953 
Term expires 1954 
Term expires 1952 
Term expires 1952 



Term expires 1954 
Term expires 1953 
Term expires 1952 



George E. Abbot 
Fred W. Doyle 
Leo F. Daley 



Recreation Committee 
Stafford A. Lindsay, Chairman Alan F. Dunlop 

George A. Stanley, Jr. Francis P. Marker 

Alco E. Taylor 



George R. Abbott 
George R. Abbott 



Superintendent of Moth Department 

Appointed Annually 

Tree Warden 



Term expires 1953 

Term expires 1952 
Term expires 1953 
Term expires 1954 



Board of Appeals 
James S. Eastham, Chairman 
Roy E. Hardy, Secretary 
Edward P. Hall 
Walter C. Tomlinson, Associate Member 
Leon A. Field, Associate Member 

An dover Housing Authority 
Stanley Swanton, Chairman, State Member Term expires 1951 



*Deceased 



Garrett J. Burke, State Member Term expires 1956 

Winthrop P. Neweomb, Treasurer Term expires 1953 

Ernest Hall, Vice Chairman Term expires 1954 

Franklyn K. Haggerty, Secretary Term expires 1956 

Charles Hatch Term expires 1955 

Fire Department 

Charles E. Buchan, Chief 

Charles E. Buchan, Forest Warden 

Police Department 

George A. Dane, Chief 

George A. Dane, Dog Officer 

Constables 

George. A. Dane Term expires 1952 

George N. Sparks Term expires 1952 

George B. Brown Term expires 1952 

TOWN OF ANDOVER 

Population 1950 Census — 12437 

Registered Voters 1951 — 7014 

POLITICAL SUBDIVISIONS INCLUDING ANDOVER 

Senators 
Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., Beverly Leverett Saltonstall, Dover 

Fifth Congressional District 
Edith Nourse Rogers, 444 Andover Street Lowell 
Fifth Councillor District 
Cornelius J. Twomey, 176 Phillips St., Lawrence 

Fourth Essex Senatorial District 
John W. Coddaire, Jr., 33 Westland Terr. Haverhill 

Fifth Essex Representative District 
J. Everett Collins, 35 Summer St. 

Frank S. Giles, 373 Lowell St. 

William Longworth, 27 Stevens St. Methuen 
Essex County Commissioners 
Arthur A. Thompson, Methuen 

C. F. Nelson Pratt, Saugus 

J. Fred Manning, Lynn 

8 



Annual Town Meeting 

MARCH 5, 1951 



Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, February 
5th, 1951, the Inhabitants of the Town of Andover, qualified to 
vote in Elections and Town Affairs, met and assembled at the 
designated polling places in Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, 
five and Six, viz: The Central Fire Station in Precinct One; 
the Square and Compass Hall in Precinct Two ; the Sacred Heart 
School, Balmoral Street, Shawsheen Village, in Precinct Three; 
the Andover Grange Hall in Precinct Four; the Fire Station, 
Ballardvale, in Precinct Five, and the Peabody House, Phillips 
House, Phillips Street, in Precinct Six, in said Andover on : 

Monday, The Fifth Day of March, 1951 
at 7 :00 o'clock A. M. to act upon the following articles : 

Essex, ss. Andover, March 5, 1951 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of 
the Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the inhab- 
itants of said town, to meeet at the time and places and for the 
purposes state in said warrant, by posting a true and attested 
copy of the same, on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse and 
in no less than five other public places where bills and notices 
are usually posted and by publication in the Andover Townsman. 
Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

George N. Sparks, Constable 

Article 1. Election of Officers 

Took up Article 1 and proceeded to vote for Town Officers. 
The Ballot boxes were found to be empty and registered 0000. 
The Polls were opened at seven o'clock A. M. and closed at seven 
o'clock P. M. The total number of ballots cast was 2862 — viz: 
Precinct 1—753, Precinct 2—490, Precinct 3—452, Precinct4— 
332, Precinct 5—369, Precinct 6— 466. 

Moderator — for One Year 
Precincts 
1 2 3 4 5 6 

636 403 392 287 316 438 Arthur Sweeney 2472 

117 87 60 45 53 28 Blanks 390 

9 









Town Clerk — for Three Years 








Precincts 




1 


2 


3 


4 5 6 




642 


419 


402 


305 336 451 George H. Winslow 


2552 


111 


71 


50 


27 33 15 Blanks 
Selectmen — for Three Years 


307 


645 


394 


397 


286 318 439 Roy E. Hardy 


2479 


108 


96 


55 


46 51 27 Blanks 
Assessor — for Three Years 


383 


631 


389 


391 


276 312 432 Roy E. Hardy 


2431 


122 


101 


61 


56 57 34 Blanks 


431 




Board of Public Works — Two for Three Years 




387 


289 


228 


127 229 269 Victor J. Mill, Jr. 


1529 


339 


189 


286 


232 126 276 William S. Titcomb 


1448 


513 


295 


229 


188 244 255 P. Leroy Wilson 


1724 


267 


207 


161 


117 139 132 Blanks 


1023 






Board of Health — for Three Years 




651 


404 


396 


291 324 433 Charles O. McCullom 


2499 


102 


86 


56 


41 45 33 Blanks 


363 



Trustee of Memorial Hall Library — for Seven Years 

622 386 384 284 316 427 Ernest D. Walen 2419 

131 104 68 48 53 39 Blanks 443 

School Committee — One for Three Years 

380 190 223 156 47 267 Gordon L. Colquhoun 1263 

206 174 118 115 40 95 Richard K Gordon 748 

138 97 95 43 269 86 Robert C. Vogt 728 

29 29 16 18 ,13 18 Blanks 123 

Planning Board — for Five Years 

603 379 378 275 307 423 Kirk R. Batcheller 2365 

150 111 74 57 62 43 Blanks 497 



10 



Andover Housing Authority — for Five Years 

Precmcts 

354 303 217 144 286 158 Franklin K. Haggerty 1462 

276 124 162 127 67 220 William G. Quigley 976 

123 63 73 61 16 88 Blanks 424 

Constables — Three for One Year 

353 253 239 144 186 247 George B. Brown 1422 

618 378 372 254 304 413 George A. Dane 2339 

378 220 211 211 140 218 Chester J. S. Harnden 1378 

539 327 329 229 314 357 George N. Sparks 2095 

371 292 205 158 163 163 Blanks 1352 

1 2 3 4 5 6 

Question No. 1 (Town Clerk's Tenure of Office) 

329 188 233 160 174 192 Yes 1276 

319 211 140 114 130 231 No 1145 

105 91 79 58 65 43 Blanks 441 

All the foregoing officers were voted for on one ballot and the 
check lists were used. 

EEPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT 1 

Andover, March 5, 1951 
Polls opened at 7 A. M. Warden in charge, Rowland W. Luce. 
Ballot box registered when pools opened 0000. Polls closed at 
7 P. M. Ballot box registered when polls closed 754. Number of 
ballots received 1608. Number of ballots returned 856. Number 
of ballots cast 753. Police officer on duty William Tammany. 
Voted to count ballots at 8 :30 A. M. 

Joseph W. McNally, Clerk 

REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT 2 

Andover, March 5, 1951 
Polls opened at 7 A. M. Warden in charge, Mark Keane. Ballot 
box registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 7 P. M. 
Ballot box registered when polls closed 490. Number of ballots 
received 1488. Number of ballots returned 998. Number* of 
ballots cast 490. Police officer on duty David Nicoll. Voted to 
count ballots at 9 :50 A. M. 

Norman K. MacLeish, CI c ri- 
ll 



REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT 3 

Andover, March 5, 1951 
Polls opened at 7 A. M. Warden in charge, Stafford A. Lindsay. 
Ballot box registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 
7 P. M. Ballot Box registered when polls closed 452. iNumber of 
ballots received 1503. Number of ballots returned 1051. Number 
of ballots cast 452. Police officer on duty Richard Caldwell. 
Voted to count ballots at 9 :20 A. M. 

Garrett J. Burke, Clerk 



REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT 4 

Andover, March 5, 1951 
Polls opened at 7 A. M. Warden in charge, Charles B. M. 
Whiteside. Ballot box registered when polls opened 0000. Polls 
closed at 7 P. M. Ballot box registered when polls closed 332. 
Number of ballots received 806. Number of ballots returned 477. 
Number of ballots cast 332. Police officer on duty, Frank Koza. 
Voted to count ballots at 10 :00 A. M. 

Frederick J. Kearn, Clerk 



REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT 5 

Andover, March 5, 1951 
Polls opened at 7 A. M. Warden in charge, William Miller, Jr. 
Ballot box registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 
7 :00 P. M. Ballot box registered when polls closed 369. Number 
of ballots received 637. Number of ballots returned 269. Number 
of ballots cast 369. Police officer on duty George N. Sparks. 
Vdted to count ballots at 11 :05 A. M. 

Eugene A. Zalla, Clerk 



12 



REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT 6 

Andover, March 5, 1951 
Polls opened at 7 A. M. Warden in charge, Joseph T. Remmes. 
Ballot box registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed at 
7 :00 P. M. Ballot box registered when polls closed 466. Number 
of ballots received 1238. Number of ballots returned 772. Number 
of ballots cast 466. Police officer on duty, Roy A. Russell. Voted 
to count ballots at 9 A. M. 

Arthur N. Ellison, Clerk 



After final action of Article One, the said meeting was ad- 
journed by virtue of Section 20, Chapter 39 of the General Laws 
to Monday, March 12th, at 7 o'clock P. M. at the Memorial 
Auditorium. 



13 



Adjourned Town Meeting 

MARCH 12, 1951 



The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 546 
persons admitted to the meeting. The meeting was called to order 
at 7 :00 P. M. by Arthur Sweeney, Moderator. 

Unanimous consent was asked to admit the following : 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Zelezny, Roger Bernard, Janet iFieldhouse, 
Bessie Christie, and Warren 0. Petersen. 

Opening prayer was offered by Rev. Roy E. Nelson, Jr. 

Salute to the flag led by J. Everett Collins. 

The warrant and return of service by the constable was read by 
the Town Clerk. 

Article 1 — To elect a Moderator for one year, a Town Clerk for 
three years, a Selectmen for three years, an Assessor for three 
years, two members of the Board of Public Works for three years, 
a member of the Board of Health for three years, a member of the 
School Committee for three years, a member of the Planning 
Board for five years, a Trustee of Memorial Hall Library for seven 
years, a member of Andover Housing Authority for five years, 
Three Constables for one year, and all town officers required by 
law to be elected by ballot, also to vote on the following question : 

"Shall the town vote to accept the provisions of section nine- 
teen B. of Chapter forty-one of the General Laws and thereby 
provide permanent tenure for George H. Winslow, the present 
incumbent in the office of town clerk ? " •_ 

All the above candidates and question to be voted for on one 
ballot. The poll will be opened from 7:00 o'clock A. M. to 7:00 
o'clock P.M. 

The Town Clerk announced the results of balloting March 5th 
declared Arthur Sweeney elected as Moderator for the ensuing 
year and he had previously been sworn to faithfully perform the 
duties of that officie. 

The Moderator then declared the other successful candidates 
elected as well as the result of question of tenure of office of 
George H. Winslow as Town Clerk by accepting the provisions of 
Section Nineteen B. of Chapter Forty-one of the General Laws. 

14 



George, H. Winslow, Town Clerk for three years. 

Roy E. Hardy, Selectman for three years. 

Roy E. Hardy, Assessor for three years. 

Victor J. Mill, Jr. Board of Public Works for three years. 

P. Leroy Wilson, Board of Public Works for three years. 

Charles 0. McCullom, Board of Health for three years. 

Ernest D. Walen, Trustee of Memorial Hall Library for seven 
years. 

Gordon L. Colquhoun, School Committee for three years. 

Kirk R. Batcheller, Planning Board for five years. 

Franklin K. Haggerty, Andover Housing Authority for five 
years. 

George B. Brown, Constable for one year. 

George A. Dane, Constable for one year. 

George N. Sparks, Constable for one year. 

Accepted provisions of Section Nineteen B. of Chapter Forty- 
one of the General Laws and thereby provided permanent tenure 
for George H. Winslow. 

Article 2 — To elect all other officers not required by law to be 
elected by ballot. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED, that Arthur W. 
Cole be elected Trustee of Cornell Fund for three years. 

Article 3 — To see what action should be taken as to the method 
of voting on articles in the warrant at this meeting, on the petition 
of John F. 'Connell and others. 

- Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED that "After a motion 
has been made and seconded on an article in the Town Warrant, a 
motion made and seconded to vote on an article by ballot shall be 
in order. If such motion is passed by a majority of the voters 
present and voting, ballots approved by the Moderator as to form 
shall be used." 

Article 4 — To see if the Town of Andover will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or transfer from available funds, the sum of $14,000. 
00 to constitute, a general raise of ten dollars a week for all per- 
manent full-time employees of the Town of Andover, as referred 
from Special Town Meeting, November 13, 1950. 

15 



Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED by SECRET 
BALLOT that the report of the Committee on wages and salaries, 
as printed on pages 131-134 of the annual Town Keport for the 
fiscal year 1950, be accepted, and that the wage and salary in- 
creases recommended therein, effective as of April 1, 1951, be 
incorporated in the departmental budgets for 1951 when these 
are presented to the town meeting for action under article 6 of 
the 1951 Town Warrant, Yes 373 No. 143. 

Upon motion duly seconded, prior to the vote of the previous 
motion, it was VOTED by STANDING VOTE to vote on the 
amended motion under Article. 4 by secret ballot. Yes 276 No. 125. 
To the Assessors and Town Accountant : 

At the Annual Town Meeting held on March 12, 1951 it was 
voted to appropriate the following sums of money : 

Article 5 — To establish the salary for elected Town Officers for 
the ensuing year. 

It was VOTED that the salaries of the elected Town Officers for 
the ensuing year be established at: (each item being voted on 
separately) : 

Chairman, Board of Selectmen per annum $ 800.00 

Two members at $600. each per annum 1200.00 
Board of Assessors 

Three members at $400. each per annum 1200.00 
Board of Public Welfare 

Three members at $100. each per annum 300.00 

Town Clerk 3800.00 

Collector of Taxes 3800.00 

Town Treasurer 3700.00 
Moth Superintendent and Tree Warden 

combined salary for both per week beginning 

April 1st. 67.00 
Board of Health 

Three members at $100. each per annum 300.00 

Chairman, Board of Public Works 300.00 

Secretary, Board of Public Works 100.00 

Treasurer, Library Trustees 100.00 

Moderator, per meeting, beginning March 12th 10.00 

16 



Article 6 — To determine what sums of money shall be appro- 
priated for the following purposes : 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to raise 
and appropriate the following sums of money, each item being 
voted on separately: 
American Legion 
Veterans of Foreign Wars 
Disabled Veterans 
Armistice Day 
Memorial Day 
Aid to Dependent Children 
Veterans Services 
Old Age Assistance 

Public Welfare-includes 22.00 in 1950 bills 
Retirement Fund 



Damages to Persons & Property 

Elections & Registrations 

Insurance 

Essex T. B. Hospital 

Recreation 

Public Dump 

Printing Town Report 

Selectmen 

Treasurer 

Collector of Taxes 

Accountant 

Assessors 

Town Clerk 

Moderator 

Town Counsel 

Finance Commit ttee 

Planning Board and Survey 

Dog Officer 

Animal Inspector 

Building Inspector 

Town Scales 

Inspector of Wires 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Municipal Buildings 



600.00 

600.00 

480.00 

150.00 

1250.00 

12200.00 

16000.00 

81200.00 

18000.00 

22134.00 

500.00 

4145.00 

18000.00 

17928.87 

9600.00 

1200.00 

1312.00 

3305.00 

5025.00 

7634.00 

5164.00 

9855.00 

5497.00 

30.00 

750.00 

20.00 

200.00 

225.00 

350.00 

1500.00 

200.00 

925.00 

760.00 

6928.00 



17 



Infirmary 


11500.00 


Moth Suppression 


8363.72 


Dutch Elm 


4166.50 


Police Dept. 


67440.00 


Parking Meter Account (taken from receipts) 


3600.00 


Fire Dept. 


83220.00 


Brush Fires 


1800.00 


Interest 


1S03.75 


Retirement of Bonds 


24000.00 


Civil Defense 


7000.00 


Tree Warden 


12351.44 


Board of Health 


6685.00 


Care of T. B. Patients 


- 4000.00 


Trustees of Memorial Library (plus dog tax) 


30756.00 


Spring Grove Cemetery 


17382.00 


School Committee (includes 1200. in Voe. Educ. and 




out of state travel) 


381487.00 


Highway Maintenance 


58660.50 


Water Maintenance 


51994.90 


Parks 


6182.28 


Sewer Maintenance 


6844.87 


Snow Removal and Sanding (Inch $2000 for equip. 




if necessary) 


18000.00 


Trucks, Garage and Repair Shop 


12389.45 


Street Lighting 


24000.00 


Administrative and Office 


17755.00 


Total Departmental 


$1,115,150.28 



Special Articles 

Article 10 — Two new automobiles Police Dept. 1447.00 

(Plus turn in on two 1950 Ford Sedans) 

Article 11— New automobile for Fire Chief 1300.00 

(Plus turn in on one old car) 

Article 15— Chapter 90-Highway Maintenance 3000.00 

Article 16— Improvement of Lowell St.- Argilla Rd. 2875.00 

Article 17 — Repair and build sidewalks 5000.00 

Article 18 — improvement of Shawsheen Rd. 3900.00 



18 



Article 19— Widening Greenwood Rd. 1500.00 

Article 20— B.P.W. Dump Truck 4200.00 

(Plus turn in of 1939 T. Truck) 

Article 21 — Extending and improving water system 12000.00 

Article 22 — Enclosing Rogers Brook 4750.00 

Article 23 — Land/or Land and Buildings Haggetts Pond 1000.00 

Article 24— Lighting, Memorial Hall Library 2100.00 

Article 25— Tree Dept. chain saw 750.00 

(Plus turn in value of old saw) 

Article 27— Spring Grove Roller 350.00 

Article 28 — Grade and surface road to Pomp's Pond 500.00 

Article 29 — Improve and Resurface Central Playground 2300.00 



Total Special Articles $46,972.00 

Total Budget and Special Articles $1,162,122.28 

Article 7 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
$1500.00 for the improvement of the ''Shaw Property" at 85 
Main Street. 

Article defeated. 

Article 8 — To see if the town will vote to authorize the Select- 
men to sell the barn now at the Town Infirmary on Carmel Road, 
the sale to be such price and under such restrictions as the Select- 
men deem advisable and to be at public auction or private sale. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 8 
as read. 

Article 9 — To see if the town will vote to authorize the Select - 
-men to sell two lots of land on the east side of Carmel Road and 
adjacent to and south of the lot on which the Infirmary garage is 
located, the sale to be at such price and under such restrictions as 
the Selectmen deem advisable and to be at public auction or pri- 
vat sale. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 9 
as read. 

Article 10 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $1447.00 with the turnin of two 1950 Ford Sedans for 
two new automobiles for the Police Department. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to raise and appro- 

19 



priate the sum of $1447.00 with the turnin of two 1950 Ford 
Sedans for two new automobiles for the Police Department. 

Article 11 — To see if the town will vote to raise, and appropriate 
$1300.00 to be used with the turn in value of the old car to pur- 
chase a new car for the use of the Chief of the Fire Department. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $1300.00 to be used with the turn in value of the 
old car to purchase a new car for the use of the Chief of the Fire 
Department. 

Article 12 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $2500.00 for the improvement of Lowell Street in the 
vicinity of Argilla Road; said money to be used in conjunction 
with any money which may be allotted by the State or county or 
both, for this purpose, as referred from annual Town Meeting, 
March 13, 1950. 

Article withdrawn. 

Article 13 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the amount of $14,000.00 for the purpose of enclosing Rogers 
Brook in a curied culvert between the west line of Whittier Street 
and south line of Chestnut Street together with such regarding as 
may be necessary therefor, as referred from annual Town Meeting, 
March 13, 1950. 

Article withdrawn. 

Article 14 — To see if the town will vote to purchase a parcel of 
land necessary for the relocation of a portion of Argilla Road at 
Lowell Street abutting land of Arthur Peatman, said parcel con- 
taining about 23,000 square feet or 0.53 acres, as shown on a plan 
on file at the office of the Town Clerk ; and grade and pave said 
relocated portion of Argilla Road ; and raise and appropriate the 
amount of $4700.00 for said land acquisition and roadway con- 
struction work, as referred from annual Town Meeting, March 13, 
1950. 

Article withdrawn. 

Article 15 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
or transfer from unappropriated available funds in the treasury, 
a sum of money for Chapter 90, Highway Maintenance, or take 

20 



any action in relation thereto. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $3000.00 under Article 15. 

Article 16 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the amount of $2875.00 for the improvement of Lowell Street in 
the vicinity of Argilla Road ; said money to be used in conjunction 
with any money which may be allotted by the State or County or 
both for this purpose. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 16 
as printed. 

Article 17 — To see if the town will authorize the Board of Pub- 
lic Works to repair and build sidewalks and raise and appropriate 
the sum of $5000.00 therefor. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to authorize the 
Board of Public Works to repair and build sidewalks and raise 
and appropriate the sum of $5000.00 therefor. 

Article 18 — To see if the town will vote to purchase or seize by 
eminent domain : a parcel of land necessary to reduce the curva- 
ture and widen the present roadway on the westerly side of Shaw- 
sheen Road abutting land now or formerly of Wilfred Boucher 
for a distance of two hundred and eighty-one (281) feet, more or 
less, as shown on a plan on file at the office of the Town Clerk ; and 
relocate the existing curbstones and widen the traveled way to 
thirty (30) feet from Cuba Street to a point about two hundred 
( 200 ) feet west of Stevens Street ; and raise and appropriate the 
amount of $4500.00 for said land acquisition and construction 
work. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to purchase or seize 
by eminent domain: a parcel of land necessary to reduce the 
curvature and widen the present roadway on the westerly side of 
Shawsheen Road abutting land now or formerly of Wilfred 
Boucher for a distance of 281 feet, more or less, as shown on a 
plan on file at the office of the Town Clerk ; and relocate the exist- 
ing curbstones and widen the traveled way to 30 fet from Cuba 
Street to a point about 200 feet west of Stevens Street ; and raise 
and appropriate the amount of $3900.00 for said land acquisition 
and construction work. 

21 • 



Article 19 — To see if the town will vote to purchase ar seize by 
eminent domain certain parcels of land on Greenwood Road 
necessary to permit the widening and relocation of said road from 
Lowell Street northerly for a distance of about 2850 feet, said 
parcels being (a) a parcel of land on the easterly side of Green- 
wood Road ow T ned now or formerly by George H. and Mary D. 
Winslow, (b) a parcel of land on the westerly side of Greenwood 
Road owned now or formerly by Fred Kress, and (c) a parcel of 
land on the easterly side of Greenwood Road owned now or form- 
erly by Frederick A. Higgins, all as shown on a plan on file at the 
office of the Town Clerk; and grade and re-surface said road as 
widened and relocated, and raise and appropriate the amount of 
$1,500.00 for said land acquisition and construction work, 
tion work. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was Voted to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $1500.00 under Article 19. 

Article 20 — To see if the town will authorize the Board of Pub- 
lic Works to purchase a dump truck and raise and appropriate the 
sum of $4200.00 therefor, and the price allowed for a Diamond T. 
truck purchased in 1939 be used as part payment for the new 
dump truck. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 20 
as printed. 

Article 21 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $12,000.00 for the purpose of extending and improving 
the water system of the Town of Andover, all work to be done 
under the supervision of the Board of Public Works and no work 
to be started until approved by the Board of Selectmen, the 
Finance Committee and the Board of Public Works. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to consider Article 
30 with Article 21. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 21 
as read. 

Article 22 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the amount of $4750.00 for the purpose, of the enclosing Rogers 
Brook in a buried* culvert from the north end of the present cul- 
vert on Chestnut Street northerly for a distance of one hundred 

22 



and fifty-one (151) feet, more or less, following the present brook 
bed on the common boundary line between land now or formerly 
of Edward M. Lidholm and land now or formerly of Ralph W. 
Coleman. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 22 
as printed. 

Article 23 — To see if the town will vote to raise, and appropriate 
the amount of $1000.00 for the acquisition of land, or land and 
buildings, on the watershed of Haggetts Pond and Fish Brook, 
for the purpose of protecting the source of watersupply and in- 
creasing the available storage; said land, or land and buildings, 
to be purchased by negotiated sale or seized by right of eminent 
domain upon the recommendation of the Board of Public Works 
and with the approval of the Town Counsel. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 23 
as printed. 

Article 24 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $2100.00 for the purpose of improving the lighting in 
the Reading Rooms of Memorial Hall Library through the in- 
stallation of modern electric light fixtures. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED by STANDING 
VOTE to accept Article 24 as printed. Yes 233 No. 118. 

Article 25 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $750.00 plus the turn-in value of an old gasoline chain 
saw, for the purchase of a new 7 H. P. and a 3 to 4 H. P. chain 
saw for use in the Tree Department and for removal of trees 
under Dutch Elm Disease, control work. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $750.00 plus the turn-in value of an old gasoline 
chain saw, for the purchase of a new 7 H. P. and a 3 to 4 H. P. 
chain saw for use in the Tree Department and for removal of 
trees under Dutch Elm Disease control work, said saw to be pur- 
shased when approved by the Selectmen and the Finance Com- 
mittee. 

Article 26 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $1300.00 plus the turn-in value of an old tractor and 
mower, for the purchase of a new tractor with mower attachment 

23 



for use in the Tree Department 
Article defeated. 

Article 27 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $350.00 for the purpose of purchasing a power lawn 
roller for Spring Grove Cemetery. 

Original motion lost by voice vote. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED, after the con- 
sideration of Article 38, to reconsider Article 27. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 27 
as printed. 

Article 28 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $500.00 to grade and surface the road into Pomp ' s 
Pond, this money to be expended under the supervision of the 
Board of Public Works and the Committee on Eecreation. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 28 
as printed. 

Article 29 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $2500.00 to improve and resurface a portion of the 
Central Playground for year round recreational purposes, this 
money to be expended under the supervision of the Board of 
Public Works and the Committee on Recreation. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $2300.00 to improve and resurface a 
portion of the Central Playground for year round recreational 
purposes, this money to be expended under the supervisinn of the 
Board of Public Works and the Committee on Recreation. 

Article 30 — To see if the town will authorize the Board of Pub- 
lic Works to extend the water main from the present dead end on 
Spring Grove Road a distance of 824 feet and appropriate the 
sum of $4500.00 therefor, on petition of Pauline Johnston and 
others. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to act upon Article 
30 with Article 21. 

Article 31 — To see if the town will vote to accept as a public 
way and name Henderson Avenue, as approved June 2, 1950 by 
the Board of Survey, as shown on a plan entitled Acceptance 

24 



Plan for Henderson Avenue, Andover, Mass. made by Ralph B. 
Brasseur, Civil Egineer, Haverhill, Mass. Both plan and de- 
scription referred to being on file at the office of the Town Clerk, 
on petition of Alexander H. Henderson and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept as a public 
way and name Henderson Avenue 475 feet from Central Street as 
approved by the Board of Survey and laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen, as shown on a plan entitled Acceptance Plan for Hen- 
derson Avenue, Andover, Mass. made by Ralph B. Brasseur, Civil 
Engineer, Haverhill, Both plan and description referred to being 
on file at the office of the Town Clerk. 

Article 32 — To see if the town will vote to accept as a public- 
way and name Memorial Circle, as approved by the Board of Sur- 
vey and laid out by the Board of Selectmen, as shown on a plan 
entitled Subdivision & Acceptance Plan, Memorial Circle made 
April 1949 by Clinton F. Goodwin, Engineer, Haverhill, Mass. 
Both plan and description referred to being on file at the Town 
Clerk's office, on petition of the Andover Housing Authority. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to have Article 32 
stricken from the warrant. 

Article 33 — To see if the town will vote to accept an extension 
of Lincoln Circle, from the present terminus, northeasterly there- 
of, as a public way, for a distance of three hundred linear feet, all 
as shown on a plan filed with the Town Clerk, entitled Acceptance 
plan for a portion of Lincoln Circle, Andover, Mass. dated Jan- 
uary, 1950, Fred W. Stowers Registered Land Surveyor, on peti- 
tion of George R. Cairns and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to have article 33 
stricken from the. warrant. . 

Article 34 — To see if the town will vote to accept the provisions 
of Chapter 820 of the Acts of 1950 which amends section 89 and 
89A of Chapter 32 of the. General Laws : an act providing for an 
increase in the annual amounts of certain pensions, retiremet al- 
lowances, annuities and other benefits payable by the town of 
Andover to certain former employees and persons claiming under 
them. 

25 



Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 34 
as printed. 

Article 35 — To see if the town will vote to accept the provisions 
of Chapter 783 of the Acts of 1950 which amends section 25 of 
Chapter 32 of the General Laws as appearing in section 1 of Chap- 
ter 658 of the acts of 1945 : an act making applicable increases in 
retirement allowances to those persons retired after January 1, 
1946 with a minimum allowance. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 35 
as printed. 

Article 36 — To see if the town will adopt the following bylaw : 
k ' After a motion has been made and seconded on an article in the 
Town Warrant, a motion made and seconded to vote on the article 
by ballot shall be in order. If such motion is passed by a majority 
of the voters present and voting, ballots approved by the Moder- 
ator as to form shall be used" on petition of John J. O'Connell, 
and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 36 
as printed. 

Article 37 — To see if the town will vote to accept $3018.00 
received in 1950, for the perpetual care of lots in Spring Grove 
Cemetery, and $10.00 additional for a flower fund, on petition of 
Thaxter Eaton, Treasurer. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Article 37 
as printed. 

Article 38 — To determine what disposition shall be made of un- 
expended appropriations and free cash in the treasury. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED that all unexpended 
appropriations be turned into the treasury, except the following ; 

Article 2 (Nov. 1950) — Civil Defense $900.00 

Article 8 (1946) — History of Andover 2000.00 

Article 22 (1945) — Shaw Property Plans 2500.00 
Article 19 (1945) — Water & Sewer Special Com. Study 486.07 

Board of Public Works Machinery Account 2596.71 

Article 11 — Sidewalks 2544.75 

Article 1 (Nov. 1950) — School Construction 325000.00 

26 



Article 26 — Preliminary Plans for School Buildings 2793.79 

Article 30 (1948) — Shawsheen School Yard 466.68 

Article 27 — E. V. Lovely, Pension 511.42 

Article 1 (Supplementary Warrant) — B.P.W. Pump 14302.25 

Article 18 — Water Dept. Improvements 5501.74 

Article 21 — Extending Water System 6934.43 

Article 24 ( 1948) — Pumping Equipment Bancroft Rd. 5361.08 

That $20,000.00 of the Overlay Surplus be transferred to the 
Reserve Fund and that $65,000.00 free cash be voted to the Asses- 
sors to reduce the 1951 tax rate and to offset appropriations for 
capital outlays voted in preceding articles. 

After the action on Article 38 it was VOTED to reconsider : 

Article 27— See Article 27 for action. 

Article 39 — To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 
Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept the report 
of Town Officers and place on file. 

Article 40 — To transact any other business that may legally 
come before the meeting. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to adjourn at 9 :31 
P. M. 



APPOINTMENTS BY THE MODERATOR 

Finance Committee 

• Charles W. Arnold George E. Abbott Stanley F. Swanton 
Harold G. Bowen Louis Gleason Fred W. Doyle 

Leo. F. Daley 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 



Attest : 

George H. Winslow, Town Clerk 



27 



Special Town Meeting 

JUNE 25, 1951 



Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, June 11, 1951 
the Inhabitants of the Town of Andover, qualified to vote in Town 
Affairs met and assembled in the Memorial Auditorium on Bartlet 
Street on Monday, the Twenty-Fifth Day of June, 1951 at 7 :30 
o'clock P.M. 

The meeting was called to order by Moderator Arthur Sweeney 
at 7:30 P. M. Prayer was offered by Rev. Frederick B. Noss. 
Selectmen J. Everett Collins led in a salute to the flag. 

Check list showed 114 voters at the meeting. 

Six voters who were not voters and whose names were presented 
by the Moderator were grantd unanimous consent to attend. 

The warrant and return f service by the Constable was read by 
the Town Clerk. 

Article 1 — To see if the town will amend its Zoning By-Laws by 
extending the business district to the west side, of Poor Street so as 
to include in the said business district, the following land, with the 
buildings thereon, owned by Esther Bredbury, to wit : Two tracts 
of land with the buildings thereon bounded and described as fol- 
lows: 

First Tmct : Beginning at the Southwesterly corner thereof at 
a point marked by a stake on the Northerly side of Lowell Street ; 
thence, running Easterly by said Lowell Street eighty-four and 
92/100 feet to an Essex County bound, thence turning and run- 
ning North 30°55' East thirty-one and 75/100 feet to a stone 
bound; thence turning and running North 19°39' West one hun- 
dred sixteen and 10/100 feet by Poor Street to an iron pipe; 
thence turning and running slightly South of West by the second 
tract hereinafter described fifty-five and 45/100 feet to an iron 
pipe, thence turning and running Southwesterly by land of the 
Town of Andover thirty-six feet to an iron post; thence turning 
and running Southerly by land of Bredbury ninety-eight and 82/ 
100 feet to a point of beginning ; containing 11,695 square feet or 
more or less, being shown as Lot No. 1-B on "Plan of Land in 

28 



Andover, Mass. Owned by Esther Bredbury" dated October, 1950, 
F. W. Stowers, Surveyor. 

Second Tract : Beginning at the Southeasterly corner thereof 
and at the Northeasterly corner of the First Tract above described, 
which point is marked by an iron pipe on the Westerly side of 
Poor Street ; thence running Northwesterly by Poor Street seven- 
ty-seven feet to a point; thence turning and running South- 
westerly thirty-three and 5/10 feet ; thence Southeasterly nine and 
3/10 feet thence Southwesterly again fift-one and 3/10 feet; 
thence Westerly eleven and 4/10 feet ; thence Southwesterly again 
about seven feet to an iron pipe; the last five courses being by 
land of the Town of Andover ; thence turning and running slightly 
North of East by the first tract above described fifty-five and 45/ 
100 feet to the point of beginning; containing 1,566 square feet 
more or less and being shown as Lot 1-A on the plan referred to 
above, on petition of Esther Bredbury and others. 

Motion was made by Attorney Vincent Stulgis to adopt Article 
1 as read was duly seconded. 

It was VOTED to vote by printed ballot on the above Article. 
Count Yes 65 No. 47 Total 112. Motion was lost since 2/3 major- 
ity vote was not received. 

Article 2 — To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
$10,000.00 to purchase or acquire by eminent domain land ad- 
jacent to the Central Schools and play stead, and authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to acquire the same. 

Upon motion made by Roy E. Hardy and duly seconded it was 
VOTED to raise and appropriate $10,000.00 to purchase land ad- 
jacent to Central Schools and playstead and authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to acquire the same. 

Article 3 — To see if the town will vote to accept an extension 
of Lincoln Circle, from the present terminus, northeasterly there- 
of, as a public way, for a distance of three hundred linear feet, all 
as shown on a plan filed with the Town Clerk, entitled Acceptance 
plan for a portion of Lincoln Circle, Adover, Mass., dated, Jan- 
uary 1950, Fred W. Stowers, Registered Land Surveyor, on peti- 
tion of Stafford A. Lindsay and others. 

Upon motion made by Stafford A. Lindsay and duly seconded 
it was VOTED to accept Article 3 as read. 

29 



Article 4 — To transact any other business that may legally come 
before the meeting. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to ad- 
journ the meeting at 8 :30 P. M. 
Essex, ss. June 25, 1951 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I the subscriber, one of the 
constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabitants 
of said town, to meet at the time and places and for the purposes 
stated in said warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the 
same, on the Town House, on each Schoolhouse, and in no less 
than five other public places where bills and notices are usually 
posted and by publication in the Andover Townsman. Said war- 
rants have been posted ad published seven days. 

George N. Sparks, Constable 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

George H. Wixslow, Town Cleric 
Attest : 



30 



Report of the Town Clerk 



To the Board of Selectmen : 

I hereby submit my report for the office of the Town Clerk 
for the year 1951. 

The total number of registered voters in Andover at the 
close of registration February 13, 1951 was 7318 by pre- 
cincts as follows : 

1 1665 

2 1444 

3 1497 

4 822 

5 652 

6 1238 



7318 

VITAL STATISTICS 

215 



179 



Number of births recorded 




Males 


105 


Females 


110 


Number of deaths recorded 




Males 


97 


Females 


82 



Number of marriages 146 

Respectfully submitted, 

George H. Winslow, Town Clerk 



Report of Director of Accounts 



May 3, 1951 
To the Board of Selectmen : 
Mr. Roy E. Hardy, Chairman 
Andover, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen : 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the books and 
accounts of the town of Andover for the fiscal year ending- 
December 31, 1950, made in accordance with the provisions 
of Chapter 44, General Laws. This is in the form of a report 
made to me by Mr. Herman B. Dine, Assistant Director of 
Accounts. 

Very truly yours, 
Francis X. Lang 

Director of Accounts 



Mr. Francis X. Lang 

Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

State House, Boston 

Sir: 

In accordance with your instructions I have made an audit 
of the books and accounts of the town of Andover for the 
fiscal year ending December 31, 1950, and submit the follow- 
ing report thereon : 

The financial transactions, as recorded on the books of the 
several departments receiving or disbursing money for the 
town or committing bills for collection, were examined, 
checked, and verified by comparison with the books of the 
town accountant and the treasurer. 

The books and accounts of the town accountant were ex- 
amined and checked. The cash receipts as recorded were 

32 



checked with the available departmental records and with 
the treasurer's books, while the payments were compared 
with the treasurer's warrants authorizing the disbursement 
of town funds. 

The ledger accounts were analyzed, the appropriation ac- 
counts were checked with the amounts voted by the town as 
shown by the town clerk's record of town meetings, the 
transfers from the reserve fund were compared with the 
amounts authorized by the finance committee, while other ac- 
counts were checked with information in the various depart- 
ments in which the transactions originated. 

A trial balance was taken off, and a balance sheet which is 
appended to this report was prepared showing the financial 
condition of the town as of December 31, 1950. 

The books and accounts of the town treasurer were exam- 
ined and checked. The receipts as recorded were analyzed 
and checked with the town accountant's books and with the 
records in the various departments collecting money for the 
town, as well as with other sources from which money was 
paid into the town treasury, while the payments were com- 
pared with the approved warrants. The cash balance as of 
January 31, 1951 was proved reconciliation of the bank ba- 
lances with statements furnished by the banks in which town 
money is deposited and by actual count of the cash in the 
office. 

The payments of debt and interest were checked with the 
amounts falling due and with the cancelled securities and 
coupons on file. 

The records of tax titles held by the town were examined. 
The additions to the tax title account were checked with the 
tax collector's records and the tax title deeds were listed and 
reconciled with the town accountant's ledger and with the 
records in the Registry of Deeds. 

The transactions of the several trust, investment, and re- 
tirement funds in the custody of the town treasurer and of 
the trustees were verified, and the securities and the savings 
bank books representing the investment of these funds were 
examined and listed. 

33 



The payroll deductions for federal taxes, for the purchase 
of savings bonds, and Blue Cross were listed and checked 
with the treasurer's record of receipts. The payments to the 
Collector of Internal Revenue for the purchase of savings 
bonds, and to the Massachusetts Hospital Service, Inc., were 
verified, and the balances in the general treasury on Jan- 
uary 31, 1951 were listed and proved with the accountant's 
ledger. 

The books and accounts of the collector of taxes were ex- 
amined and checked in detail. The taxes, excise, and assess- 
ments outstanding at the time of the previous examination 
and all subsequent commitments were audited and reconciled 
with the assessors' warrants for their collection. 

The payments to the treasurer for the several levies were 
compared with the treasurer's cash book, the abatements 
were checked with the assessors' records of abatements 
granted, and the outstanding accounts were listed and recon- 
ciled with the accounts as shown in the accountant's ledger. 

The records of departmental and of the water and sewer 
accounts were examined and checked. The reported pay- 
ments to the treasurer were compared with the treasurer's 
cash book, the abatements were verified, and the outstanding 
accounts were listed and reconciled with the town account- 
ant's ledger. 

The outstanding tax, assessment, excise, departmental, 
and sewer and water accounts were verified by mailing no- 
tices to a number of persons whose names appeared on the 
books and records as owing money to the town, the replies 
received thereto indicating that the accounts, as listed, are 
correct. 

The financial transactions of the town clerk were exam- 
ined. The receipts for dog and sporting licenses were checked 
with the record of licenses issued, and the payments to the 
Division of Fisheries and Game and to the town treasurer 
were verified. The receipts for town licenses, marriage per- 
mits, recording fees, and miscellaneous charges were check- 
ed, the payments to the town treasurer were verified, and the 
cash on hand on January 31, 1951 was proved by actual 
count. 

34 



The surety bonds of the town officials and of the trust fund 
trustees required to file them for faithful performance of 
their duties were examined and found to be in proper form. 

The records of cash collections by the sealer of weights 
and measures, by the inspectors of buildings, wires, and 
plumbing, and of the health, police, school, and library de- 
partments, as well as of all other departments in which 
money was collected for the town, were examined and check- 
ed. The payments to the town treasurer were verified and the 
cash on hand was proved by actual count. 

In addition to the balance sheet referred to, there are ap- 
pended to this report tables showing a reconciliation of the 
treasurer's and tax collector's cash, summaries of the tax, 
excise, assessment, tax title, departmental, and water ac- 
counts, together with tables showing the condition and tran- 
sactions of the trust, investments, and retirement funds. 

While engaged in making the audit, cooperation was re- 
ceived from all the officials of the town, for which, on behalf 
of my assistants and for myself, I wish to express appreci- 
ation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Herman B. Dine, 

Assistant Director of Accounts 



35 



Report of the 
Town Accountant 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1951 



To the Board of Selectmen, 
Andover, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

In accordance with Chapter 41, Section 61, of the General 
Laws, I submit herewith my annual report for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1951. 

A detailed statement of the receipts and their sources, and 
of the payments and the purposes therefore, follows. The 
condition of the various trust funds, as well as the Town of 
Andover Retirement Fund, sources of incomes and the 
amounts paid out are also set forth. A statement of the tem- 
porary loans, maturing debt and interest is included. 

A balance sheet, which is appended to this report, was pre- 
pared showing the assets and liabilities as of December 31, 
1951. 

The State Accountants have compiled with statutes and 
audited the Town books for the year ending December 31, 
1950. They are expected in the near future to audit the 
Town's accounts for 1951. 

May I express my thanks for the co-operation accorded 
to me by your Board, as well as by each Town Department 
during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George C. Napier, 
Toivn Accountant 



36 



Appropriations for 1951 



APPROPRIATIONS 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 12, 1951 

General Government $ 56,128.00 

Protection to Persons & Property 184,023.66 

Health and Sanitation 36,658.74 

Highways 133,524.95 

Charities and Veterans' Service 138,900.00 

Schools and Libraries 414,343.00 

Recreation and Unclassified 86,313.28 

Enterprise and Cemeteries 82,726.90 

Interest and Maturing Debt 25,903.75 



Total Appropriations, March 12, 1951 $1,158,522.28 

APPROPRIATIONS 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, JUNE 25, 1951 

(To be raised in 1952) 

Article 2, Purchase Land Adjacent to Central 

Schools and Playstead $ 10,000.00 



Receipts for 1951 



Tax Collector: 

Taxes $ 970,380.25 

Certificates of Municipal Liens 98.00 

Abatement of Motor Vehicle Excise 

Tax Gift 41.95 

$ 970,520.20 

Amount Carried Forward $970,520.20 

37 



Amount Brought Forward 




$970,520.20 


Treasurer : 








School Loan $ 800,000.00 






Article 16, Highways, Loan 


8,625.00 






Premium School Loan 


1,140.00 






Accrued Interest School Loan 


700.00 






Sale of Treasury Bills 640,000.00 






Discount on Treasury Bills 


6,868.00 






Essex County Dog Tax 


2,175.66 






Tax Title, Tailings, Etc. 


106.01 










$1,459,614.67 






Town Clerk, Fees and Licenses 






3,861.30 


Board of Selectmen, Licenses 






7,829.50 


Police Department : 








Fines and Permits 


332.00 






Sale of Beacon Head 


35.00 






Insurance for Damages to Traffic 








Light 


15.00 










$ 


382.00 


Fire Department : 




Use or Ambulance 


246.00 






Oil Burner Permits 


169.00 






Sale of Truck 


21.00 










$ 


426 00 


Municipal Buildings : 




tOU.UU 


Rentals 


1,234.50 






Sale of Settees, Sink and Cabinet 


62.00 










$ 


1,296.50 






Sealer of Weights and Measures Fees 


$ 


275.10 


Building Inspector's Fees 






3,207.50 


Wire Inspector's Fees 






439.00 


Public Weigher's Fees 






95.60 


Board of Health, Licenses and Fees 






602.50 


Health and Sanitation, Fees 






2,286.34 


Board of Public Works, Sale of Scrap and Boat 






Licenses 




$2, 


42.45 


Amount Carried Forward 


450.888.66 



38 



Amount Brought Forward $2,450,888.66 

Highways : 
From State : 

For Snow Plowing $ 117.00 

Division of Highways, Chapter 90 
Contract 13218 Construction 5,736.78 
Contract 12383 Maintenance 965.90 
From County : 

Contract 13217 Maintenance 999.40 



$ 

Infirmary 

Reimbursements for Public Welfare 

Aid to Dependent Children 

Old Age Assistance 

Veterans Service 
Veterans Service, Photostatic Copies 


7,819.08 
2,629.50 
1,132.88 
5,419.68 
51,412.35 
3,178.04 
4.75 


School Department: 

Tuition, State Wards 607.42 
Other Tuition 11,914.00 
Rentals and Other 329.28 


12,850.70 
4,084.69 


«P 
Library Department, Income from 
Investments, Fines, Etc. 



Water Department: 

Rates $ 67,834.30 

Services and Miscellaneous 665.98 







$ 


68,500.28 


Cemetery Department 






5,632.58 


Trust and Investments : 








Perpetual Cares 


4,305.14 






Trust Funds 


75,821.35 










$ 


80,126.49 


Withholding Taxes 






74,794.40 


Defense Bonds 






4,342.99 


Blue Cross 






6,892.91 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts : 








Income Taxes 






99,491.41 


Amount Carried Forward 




$2,879,201.39 



39 



Amount Brought Fomvard 


$2,879,201.39 


Corporation Taxes 


143,293.09 


Meal Taxes 


2,355.45 


Hawker's and Pedler's Licenses 


136.00 


Reimburse Loss Taxes 


1,443.75 


Vocational Education 


856.59 


Smith — Hughes — George — Barden Fund 


27.41 


High School Transportation 


7,840.00 


Aid to Dependent Children Grants 


7,805.26 


Old Age Assistance Grants 


69,862.09 


Andover Housing Authority 


289.87 


Punchard Athletic Association 


4,423.28 


Sale of Carmel Road Lot 


803.00 


Parking Meters 


10,729.37 


School Cafeteria 


25,933.15 


School Milk Fund 


888.50 


Refunds 


1,584.50 


Total Receipts, 1951 


$3,157,472.70 



40 



Expenditures for 1951 



APPROPRIATION ACCOUNTS 



CIVILIAN DEFENSE 




Cr. 






Balance from 1950 




$ 900.00 


Revenue 1951 




7,000.00 


Petty Cash Refund 




25.00 


Dr. 






Salary, Director 


$ 4,303.00 




Salary, Clerk 


280.00 




Office Maintenance 


550.68 




Equipment 


2,423.78 




Transportation and Other 


230.18 




Total Expenditures 


$ 7,787.64 




Balance to 1952 


137.36 






$ 7,925.00 


$ 7,925.00 


SELECTMEN 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$ 3,305.00 


Dr. 






Salaries, Selectmen 


$ 1,833.32 




Salaries, Clerks 


919.18 




Office Maintenance and Other 


383.67 




Total Expenditures 


$ 3,136.17 




Balance to Revenue 


168.83 





$ 3,305.00 $ 3,305.00 

41 





ACCOUNTANT 






Cr. 






Appropriation 


Dr. 




$ 5,164.00 


Salary, Accountant 




$ 3,625.00 




Salary, Clerk 




923.00 




Office Maintenance 


nditures 


533.76 




Total Expei 


$ 5,081.76 




Balance to Revenue 


82.24 





$ 5,164.00 $ 5,164.00 



TREASURER 
Cr. 



Appropriation 




$ 5,025.00 


Transfer from Reserve Fund 




810.50 


Dr. 






Salary, Treasurer 


$ 3,625.00 




Salaries, Clerks 


601.00 




Bond Issue Expenses 


810.50 




Office Maintenance and Other 


792.11 




Total Expenditures 


$ 5,828.61 




Balance to Revenue 


6.89 






$ 5,835.50 


$ 5,835,50 


TAX COLLECTOR 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$ 7,634.00 


Dr. 






Salary, Tax Collector 


$ 3,725.00 




Salary, Clerk 


2,320,50 




Office Maintenance 


1,402.65 




Total Expenditures 


$ 7,448.15 




Balance to Revenue 


185.85 





$ 7,634.00 $ 7,634.00 
42 



ASSESSORS 






Cr. 






Refund 




$ 22.20 


Appropriation 




9,855.00 


Petty Cash Refund 




5.00 


Dr. 






Salaries, Assessors 


$ 1,200.00 




Assistant Assessors 


750.00 




Salaries, Clerks 


3,978.00 




Engineering 


2,669.36 




Office Maintenance and Other 


901.32 




Total Expenditures 


$ 9,498.68 




Balance to Revenue 


383.52 






$ 9,882.20 


$ 9,882.20 


TOWN CLERK 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$ 5,497.00 


Transfer from Reserve Fund 




100.00 


Dr. 






Salary, Town Clerk 


$ 3,725.00 




Salary,Clerk 


1,608.00 




Office Maintenance and Other 


250.22 





Total Expenditures 
Balance to Reserve Fund 



5,583.22 
13.78 



$ 5,597.00 $ 5,597.00 



Appropriation 

Salary, Moderator 
Balance to Revenue 



MODERATOR 
Cr. 

Dr. 



$ 30.00 



20.00 
10.00 



$ 30.00 $ 30.00 



43 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 20.00 

Dr. 



Membership Fee 
Balance to Revenue 


$ 


10.00 
10.00 








$ 


20.00 


$ 


20.00 


TOWN COUNSEL 








Cr. 

Appropriation 

Dr. 
Salary, Town Counsel 
Court Services, Etc. 


$ 


500.00 
192.20 




750.00 


Total Expenditures 
Balance to Revenue 


$ 


692.20 

57.80 






$ 


750.00 


$ 


750.00 


DOG OFFICER 






• 


Cr. 

Appropriation 

Dr. 
Salary, Dog Officer 


$ 


225.00 


$ 


225.00 




? 


225.00 


$ 


225.00 


ANIMAL INSPECTOR 






Cr. 

Appropriation 

Dr. 

Salary, Animal Inspector 
Balance to Revenue 


$ 


325.00 
25.00 


$ 


350.00 



$ 350.00 $ 350.00 

44 



PLANNING BOARD AND BOARD OF SURVEY 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 200.00 

Dr. 

Salary, Clerk $ 100.00 

Balance to Revenue 100.00 



$ 200.00 $ 200.00 



ELECTION AND REGISTRATION 
Cr. 



Appropriation 






$ 4,145.00 


Dr. 








Salaries, Clerks 


$ 


755.58 




Salaries, Registrars 




156.00 




Assistant Registrars 




750.00 




Election Officers 




588.00 




Election Expenses 




524.30 




Street Lists 




560.00 




Printing and Advertising 




720.51 




Office Maintenance 




89.71 




Total Expenditures 


$ 4,144.10 




Balance to Revenue 




.90 





$ 4,145.00 $ 4,145.00 

MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 6,928.00 

Dr. 

Salary, Janitor $ 2,476.50 

Extra Janitorial Service 96.90 

Fuel 1,140.48 

Lawrence Gas & Electric Company 636.91 

Janitor's Supplies 522.68 

Repairs and Maintenance 1,641.24 



Total Expenditures $ 6,514.71 

Balance to 1951 413.29 



$ 6,928.00 $ 6,928.00 



45 



PARKING METERS 

Cr. 

Transfer Parking Meter Receipts $ 3,600.00 

Dr. 
Salary, Police Officer $ 3,070.60 

Equipment 127.41 



Total Expenditures $ 3,198.01 

Balance to Parking Meters 

Account 401.99 



$ 3,600.00 $ 3,600.00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 
Cr. 



Appropriation 




$67,440.00 


Transfer from Reserve Fund 
Refund 




2,100.00 
.60 


Dr. 






Salaries : 






Chief 


$ 4,309.50 




Patrolmen 


49,267.27 




Clerk, Special Police, Matron 






and Other Employees 


4,869.52 




Equipment Maintenance 


3,182.31 




Equipment for Men 


431.59 




Traffic Lights, Signs and Signals 


1,841.78 




Office Maintenance and Other 


1,428.73 




Total Expenditures 


$65,330.70 




Revenue 1951 


2,109.90 




Balance to 1952 


2,100.00 






$69,540.60 


$69,540.60 



46 



ARTICLE 10— POLICE DEPARTMENT— TWO NEW 
AUTOMOBILES 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 1,447.00 

Dr. 
Purchase Two New Automobiles $ 1,447.00 





$ 1,447.00 


$ 1,447.00 


FIRE DEPARTMENT 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$83,220.00 


Dr. 






Salaries : 






Chief 


$ 4,309.50 




Firemen 


62,890.30 




Call Men 


4,877.00 




Ambulance Assistance 


13.00 




Equipment 


1,452.78 




Equipment for Men 


134.10 




Maintenance and Repairs 


2,860.93 




Alarm Boxes, Etc. 


1,179,94 




Fuel 


1,433.74 




Lawrence Gas & Electric Company 


646.88 




Maint. of Buildings and Grounds 


2,828.06 




Office Maintenance and Other 


588.81 




Total Expenditures 


$83,215.04 




Balance to Revenue 


4.96 





$83,220.00 $83,220.00 

ARTICLE 11— FIRE DEPARTMENT— NEW AUTOMOBILE 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 1,300.00 

Dr. 

Purchase New Automobile ■ $ 1,300.00 



$ 1,300.00 $ 1,300.00 

47 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Cr. 

Appropriation • $ 1,500.00 

Dr. 

Salary, Building Inspector $ 937.50 

Use of Car, Supplies, Etc. 375.41 



Total Expenditures $ 1,312.91 

Balance to Revenue 187.09 





$ 1,500.00 


$ 1,500.00 


WIRE INSPECTOR 






Cr. 

Appropriation 






$ 925.00 


Dr. 








Salary, Wire Inspector 
Use of Car, Supplies, Etc. 


$ 


600.00 
153.75 




Total Expenditures 
Balance to Revenue 


$ 


753.75 
171.25 





$ 925.00 $ 925.00 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 760.00 

Dr. 

Salary, Sealer Weights & Measures "$ 529.98 
Use of Car, Supplies, Etc. 159.25 



Total Expenditures $ 689.23 

Balance to Revenue 70.77 



$ 760.00 $ 760.00 
48 



HISTORY OF ANDOVER UP TO 
AND INCLUDING WORLD WAR II 

Cr. 

Balance from 1950 $ 2,000.00 

Dr. 
Travel and Supplies $ 200.00 

Balance to 1952 1,800.00 





$ 2,000.00 


$ 2,000.00 


MOTH SUPPRESSION 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$ 8,363.72 


Refund 




11.49 


Dr. 






Salary, Moth Superintendent 


$ 1,543.00 




Labor 


4,479.64 




Office Maintenance and Other 


218.37 




Insecticides, Hardware and Tools 


1,155.35 




Gasoline, Oil and Truck Maint. 


968.76 




Total Expenditures 


$ 8,365.12 




Balance to Revenue 


10.09 






$ 8,375.21 


$ 8,375.21 


CONTROL DUTCH ELM DISEASE 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$ 4,166.50 


Dr. 






Labor 


$ 2,574.00 




Insecticides and Other 


1,591.95 




Total Expenditures 


$ 4,165.95 




Balance to Revenue 


.55 





$ 4,166.50 $ 4,166.50 
49 



TREE WARDEN 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$12,351.44 


Dr. 






Salary, Tree Warden 


$ 1,876.00 




Labor 


9,003.50 




Office Maintenance 


222.70 




Trees, Loam, Insecticides, Tools 






and Equipment 


602.19 




Gasoline, Oil and Truck Maint. 


645.68 




Total Expenditures 


$12,350.07 




Balance to Revenue 


1.37 





$12,351.44 $12,351.44 

ARTICLE 25— TREE DEPARTMENT— CHAIN SAW 

Cr. 



Appropriation 

Dr. 
Purchase Chain Saw $ 
Balance to 1952 


$ 

717.52 

32.48 


750.00 


$ 

FOREST FIRES 
Cr. 


750.00 $ 


750.00 



Appropriation $ 1,800.00 

Dr. 

Salary, Fire Warden $ 225.00 

Wages, Fighting Fires 472.00 

Hose 506.06 

Equipment, Maintenance, Gas and Oil 580.56 



Total Expenditures $ 1,783.62 

Balance to Revenue 16.38 



$ 1,800.00 $ 1,800.00 
50 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 




Cr. 

Appropriation 




$ 6,685.00 


Petty Cash Refund 




10.00 


Dr. 






Salaries, Board of Health 


$ 298.08 




Salary, Agent 


2,625.00 




Clerical Assistance 


95.00 




Office Maintenance 


292.18 




Rabies Vaccine and Dog Vaccinations 339.23 




Baby Clinic 


409.76 




Milk Inspector, Salary and Expens 


es 296.09 




Plumbing Inspector 


542.00 




Agent, Use of Car 


440.50 




Recording Vital Statistics 


17.75 




Total Expenditures 


$ 5,355.59 




Balance to Revenue 


1,339.41 





$ 6,695.00 $ 6,695.00 

CARE AND TREATMENT OF TUBERCULAR PATIENTS 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 4,000.00 

Dr. 
Care and Treatment of Tubercular 

Patients $ 1,293.00 

Balance to Revenue 2,707.00 



$ 4,000.00 $ 4,000.00 

ESSEX COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL 

Cr. 

Balance from 1950 $ 1,352.08 

Appropriation 17,928.87 



Amount Carried Fomvard $19,280.95 

51 



Amount Brought Forward $19,280.95 

Dr. 

Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital $17,314.72 
Revenue 1951 1,352.08 



Total Expenditures $18,666.80 

Balance to 1952 614.15 



$19,280.95 


$19,280.95 


PUBLIC DUMP 




Cr. 




Appropriation 


$ 1,200.00 


Dr. 




Salary, Keeper of Dump $ 1,040.00 




Balance to Revenue 160.00 





$ 1,200.00 $ 1,200.00 

SEWER MAINTENANCE 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 6,844.87 

Dr. 
Salary, Chairman, Board of Public 

Works $ 56.25 

Labor 4,208.38 

Lawrence Gas and Electric Company 2,091.49 
Tools, Equipment and Other 153.45 



Total Expenditures $ 6,509.57 
Balance to Revenue 335.30 


$ 6,844.87 


$ 6,844.87 


HIGHWAYS MAINTENANCE 




Cr. 

Appropriation 


$58,660.50 



52 



Amount Brought Forward $58,660.50 

Dr. 



Salary, Chairman, Board of Public 




Works 


$ 100.00 


Labor 


36,017.38 


Pipe, Fittings and Culverts 


658.22 


Tools and Equipment 


2,159.12 


Maintenance, Gasoline and Oil 


465.55 


Truck Hire 


731.25 


Sand,Gravel and Cement 


491.25 


Asphalt, Tarvia and Road Oil 


17,457.24 


Use of Car 


405.30 


Telephone and Other 


173.42 


Total Expenditures 


$58,658.73 


Balance to Revenue 


1.77 



$58,660.50 $58,660.50 

TRUCKS, GARAGE AND REPAIR SHOP MAINTENANCE 

Cr. 

Appropriation $12,389.45 

Dr. 

Labor $ 3,620.60 

Fuel Oil 713.93 

Lawrence Gas and Electric Company 536.13 
Gasoline, Oil and Truck Maintenance 7,260.88 
Hardware and Tools 115.62 

Telephone and Other 141.91 



Total Expenditures $12,389.07 

Balance to Revenue .38 



$12,389.45 $12,389.45 



53 



ARTICLE 11— 1950— REPAIR AND BUILD SIDEWALKS 

Cr. 

2,544.75 



Balance from 1950 




Dr. 




Labor 


$ 1,507.14 


Tar Patch 


906.43 


Furring and Use of Roller 


131,18 



$ 2,544.75 $ 2,544.75 

ARTICLE 15— CHAPTER 90— HIGHWAYS MAINTENANCE 

Cr. 



Appropriation 




$ 3,000.00 


Dr. 






Labor 


$ 1,022.31 




Crushed Stone, Asphalt and Oil 


1,975.89 




Total Expenditures 


$ 2,998.20 




Balance to 1952 


1.80 






$ 3,000.00 


$ 3,000.00 


ARTICLE 16— IMPROVEMENT OF LOWELL STREET 


AND ARGILLA ROAD 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$ 2,875.00 


State and County Aid to Highways Revenue 


8,625.00 


Dr. 






Labor 


$ 3,955.93 




Pipe, Gates and Frames 


412.86 




Asphalt 


948.63 




Crushed Stone 


1,713.23 




Gravel, Loam, Etc. 


995.00 




Use of Shovel, Truck Hire 


873.25 




Fences 


510.50 




Police and Other 


94.74 





Amount Carried Forward $ 9,504.14 $11,500.00 

54 



Amount Brought Forward $ 9,504.14 $11,500.00 

Total Expenditures $ 9,504.14 



Transfer to Board of Public 

Works Machinery Account 1,974.36 
Balance to 1952 21.50 



$11,500.00 $11,500.00 

ARTICLE 17— REPAIR AND BUILD SIDEWALKS 

Cr. 



Appropriation 

Dr. 
Labor 
Tarvia 
Loam, Lumber and Other 


$ 1,462.99 

1,548.25 

177.14 


$ 5,000.00 


Total Expenditures 
Balance to 1952 


$ 3,188.38 
1,811.62 





$ 5000.00 $ 5,000.00 

ARTICLE 18— IMPROVEMENT OF SHAWSHEEN ROAD 

Cr. 



Appropriation 




$ 3,900.00 


Dr. 






Labor 


$2,032.38 




Tarvia 


542.52 




Tree Removal 


240.00 




Building Stone Wall, 






Brick and Cement 


187.40 




Pipe, Use of Shovel and Other 


315.83 




Total Expenditures 


$ 3,318.13 




Balance to 1952 


581.87 





$ 3,900.00 $ 3,900.00 
55 



ARTICLE 19— WIDENING GREENWOOD ROAD 


Cr. 




Appropriation 


$ 1,500.00 


Dr. 




Labor 


$ 68.02 


Truck and Shovel Hire 


817.50 


Purchase of Land 


200.00 


Pipe, Cutting Brush and Other 


289.17 


Total Expenditures 


$ 1,374.69 


Balance to 1952 


125.31 



$ 1,500.00 $ 1,500.00 

ARTICLE 20— BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

DUMP TRUCK 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 4,200.00 

Dr. 
Purchase Truck $ 4,176.92 

Balance to 1952 23.08 



$ 4,200.00 $ 4,200.00 

SNOW REMOVAL AND SANDING 
Cr. 



Appropriation 




$18,000.00 


Transfer from Reserve Fund 




1,500.00 


Dr. 






Labor 


$13,626.79 




Plowing and Sanding 


1,598.75 




Tools and Equipment 


1,647.33 




Gasoline and Oil 


496.85 




Salt and Sand 


1,744.08 




Weather Service, 






Use of Car and Other 


346.70 




Total Expenditures 


$19,460.50 




Balance to Reserve Fund 


39.50 





$19,500.00 $19,500.00 
56 



STREET LIGHTING 

Cr. 

Appropriation $24,000.00 

Dr. 

Street Lighting $23,694.67 

Balance to Revenue 305.33 



$24,000.00 $24,000.00 

PUBLIC WELFARE 

Cr. 

Appropriation $18,000.00 

Transfer from Reserve Fund 1,000.00 

Refund 4.00 

Dr. 

Salaries, Board of Public Welfare $ 300.00 



Salary, Agent 


635.00 


Clerk 


364.00 


Groceries and Provisions 


1,153.75 


Fuel 


162.99 


Board and Care 


652.90 


Medicine and Medical Attendance 


767.24 


State Institutions 


4,046.85 


Cash Grants to Individuals 


6,748.91 


Relief by Other Cities and Towns 


4,097.53 


Total Expenditures 


$18,929.17 


Balance to Reserve Fund 


74.83 



$19,004.00 $19,004.00 

AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN 

(TOWN) 

Cr. 

Appropriation $12,200.00 



57 



Amount Brought Forward 




$12,200.00 


Dr. 






Administration : 






Salary, Agent 


$ 559.53 




Clerk 


336.00 




Aid: 






Aid to Dependent Children 


9,075.80 




Total Expenditures 


$ 9,971.33 




Balance to Revenue 


2,228.67 






$12,200.00 


$12,200.00 


AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN 




(FEDERAL GRANTS) 




Cr. 






Balance from 1950 




$ 1,630.15 


Federal Grants Received in 1951 




7,805.26 


Recovery 




27.92 


Dr. 






Administration : 






Salary, Agent 


$ 126.47 




Clerk 


80.00 




Office Maintenance 


35.16 




Aid: 






Aid to Dependent Children 


9,221.70 




Total Expenditures 


$ 9,463.33 


$ 9,463.33 


OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 




(TOWN) 






Cr. 






Appropriation 




$91,200.00 


Recovery 




12.65 


Refunds 




124.50 



58 



Amount Brought Fomvard 




$91,337.15 


Dr. 






Administration : 
Salary, Agent 


$ 1,102.45 




Clerk 


651.01 




Office Maintenance 


170.69 




Aid: 






Old Age Assistance 


65,142.78 




Paid to other Cities and Towns 


2,038.88 




Total Expenditures 


$69,105.81 




Balance to Revenue 


22,231.34 






$91,337.15 


$91,337.15 


OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 


• 


(FEDERAL GRANTS) 




Cr. 

Balance from 1950 




$ 402.49 


Federal Grants Received in 1951 
Refunds 




69,862.09 
146.45 


Dr. 






Administration 






Salary, Agent 


$ 1,407.55 




Clerk 


1,012.99 




Office Maintenance 


107.72 




Aid: 






Old Age Assistance 


59,716.97 





Total Expenditures $62,245.23 

Balance to 1952 8,165.80 



$70,411.03 $70,411.03 

INFIRMARY 

Cr. 

Appropriation $11,500.00 



59 



Amount Brought Forward 

Dr. 
Salary, Matron $ 


$11,500.00 


1,100.00 


Other Employees 


3,117.90 


Groceries and Provisions 


3,556.23 


Dry Goods and Clothing 


305.35 


Maintenance Buildings and Grounds 


1,007.18 


Fuel 


645.89 


Lawrence Gas and Electric Company 


411.56 


Household Furnishings and Supplies 


404.13 


Medicine and Medical Services 


299.75 


Use of Car 


183.29 


Miscellaneous Expenses 


241.43 



Total Expenditures 


$11,272.71 




Balance to Revenue 


227.29 






$11,500.00 


$11,500.00 


VETERANS' 


SERVICE 




Cr. 

Appropriation 
Refunds 




$16,000.00 
20.00 


Dr. 






Administration : 
Salary, Agent 


$ 3,865.01 


• 


Clerks 


2,185.00 




Clerk, Photostats 


59.12 




Office Maintenance 


482.11 




Veterans' Benefits 






Cash Allowance 


3,672.48 




Groceries, Provisions, 






Fuel and Other 


1,060.91 




Veterans' Burials 


183.00 




Medicine and Medical Care 


781.99 




Total Expenditures 


$12,289.62 




Balance to Revenue 


3,730.38 





$16,020.00 $16,020.00 
60 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 





Cr. 


Appropriation 


$ 381,487.00 




Dr. 


Salaries, Superintendent 


$ 7,365.42 


Clerks 


6,961.73 


Attendance Officer 


100.00 


Office Maintenance 


2,223.77 


Travelling Expenses 


262.37 


School Census and Other 


165.80 


Teacher's Salaries : 




High 


67,467.38 


Junior High 


57,441.92 


Elementary 


136,106.78 


Text Books and Supplies : 




High 


5,286.10 


Junior High 


2,441.69 


Elementary 


6,524.02 


Tuition, High 


513.66 


Transportation : 




High 


6,791.43 


Junior High 


6,336.33 


Elementary 


6,766.52 


Janitor Services: 




High 


9,257.87 


Junior High 


9,257.87 


Elementary 


9,258.30 


Fuel: 




High 


3,844.76 


Junior High 


3,844.75 


Elementary 


5,665.23 



Amount Carried Fomvard $ 353,883.70 $ 381.487.00 



61 



Amount Brought Forward 


$353,883.70 $2 


81,487.00 


Maintenance of Buildings 






and Grounds 






High 


4,840.04 




Junior High and Elementary 


11,223.93 




Health : 
High 


2,325.48 




Jr. High 


2,225.48 




Elementary 


2,295.04 




Lawrence Gas and Electric Company : 




High 


1,175.10 




Junior High 


1,175.07 




Elementary 


1,175.14 




Vocational Education: 






Teachers' Salaries $ 


1,047. 50 




Other Employees 


110.00 




Total Expenditures $ 


381,476.48 




Balance to Revenue 


10.52 





$ 381,487.00 $ 381,487.00 

ARTICLE 1— SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION 
Cr. 

Balance from 1950 $ 325,000.00 

Loan 800,000.00 

Post War Rehabilitation Fund 75,000.00 

Refund 904.00 

Dr. 

CENTRAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Walter L. Ritchie, Contractor $ 453,208.90 
Architectural Fees 33,956.14 

Engineering 145.68 

Clerk of Works 2,244.66 

Labor, Sewer Connection, Pipe, Etc. 500.54 
Furniture 10,217.62 

Amount Carried Forward $500,273.54 $1,200,904.00 

62 



Amount Brought Forward $500,273.54 $1,200,904.00 

Advertising and Other 139.27 



$ 500,412.81 



WEST CENTER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 



Walter L. Ritchie, Contractor 


$ 


261,488.80 


Architectural Fees 




18,683.01 


Engineering 




112.94 


Clerk of Works 




1,122.34 


Labor, Sewer Connection, 






Pipe, Etc 




1,040.08 


Purchase of Land 
Furniture 




5,000.00 
3,419.92 


Advertising and Other 


$ 


69.50 




290,936.59 


Total Expenditures 


791,349.40 


Balance to 1952 




409,554.60 



$1,200,904.00 $1,200,904.00 



ARTICLE 26 —1950— PRELIMINARY PLANS 


ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BUILDINGS 


Cr. 




Balance from 1950 


$ 2,793.79 


Dr. 




Engineering $ 


870.10 


Labor, Sewer Connection 


63.06 


Advertising 


24.75 



Total Expenditure? $ 957.91 

Balance to 1952 1,835.88 



$ 2,793.79 $ 2,793.79 



63 



ARTICLE 30, 1948— SHAWSHEEN SCHOOL YARD 




Cr. 








Balance from 1950 


Dr. 




$ 


466.68 


Labor 




$ 129.58 






Loam, Seed and Brush Re 


moval 

3S 


249.42 






Total Expenditur< 


$ 379.00 




Balance to 1952 




87.68 








$ 466.68 


$ 


466.68 


SCHOOL CAFETERIA 








Cr. 








Balance from 1950 






$ 


2,902.23 


Receipts in 1951 






25,933.15 


Tailings 








3.38 


Petty Cash Refunds 


Dr. 






35.00 


Salaries, Supervisors 




$ 2,444.00 






Cafeteria Assistants 




6,768.14 






Groceries and Provisions 




17,092.58 






Maintenance of Kitchen 




639.71 






Repairs 




400.48 






Insurance 




308.16 






Miscellaneous Expenses 


res 


301.66 






Total Expenditu] 


$27,954.73 




Balance to 1952 




919.03 







$28,873.76 $28,873.76 

SCHOOL MILK FUND 
Cr. 

Receipts in 1951 $ 888.50 

Dr. 
Purchase of Milk $ 862.04 

Balance to 1952 26.46 



$ 888.50 $ 888.50 
64 



PUNCHARD ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 




Cr. 

Balance from 1950 




$ 961.32 


Receipts in 1951 




4,422.98 


Petty Cash Refunds 




100.00 


Dr. 






Services, Officials at Games 


$ 539.00 




Taxes, Collector of Internal Revenue 


316.10 




Medical Supplies and Attendance 


138.12 




Police and Janitor Service 


327.00 




Equipment 


1,826.43 




Soliciting for Program 






and Ticket Selling 


255.98 




Game Guarantees 


697.59 




Transportation and Meals 


785.87 




Miscellaneous 


437.45 




Total Expenditures 


$ 5,323.54 




Balance to 1952 


161.06 





$ 5,484.60 $ 5,484.60 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 
Cr. 



Appropriation 




$30,756.00 


Dog Account Refund 




2,175.66 


Income from Investments 




2,550.00 


Dr. 






Salaries, Librarian 


$ 4,080.99 




Assistants 


14,246.83 




Treasurer 


100.00 




Janitors 


2,988.47 




Books and Periodicals 


7,204.67 




Bindings 


864.20 




Maintenance of Buildings 






and Grounds 


2,314.42 




Fuel and Light 


1,652.20 





Amount Carried Forward $33,451.78 $35,481.66 

65 



Amount Brought Forwa rd $33,451-78 $35,481.66 

Office Maintenance 1,886.56 

Miscellaneous Expenses 138.52 



Total Expenditures $35,476.86 

Balance to Revenue 4.80 



$35,481.66 $35,481.66 

ARTICLE 24— LIGHTING— MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 2,100.00 

Dr. 

Lighting $ 2,100.00 





$ 


2,100.00 $ 


2,100.00 


ADMINISTRATIVE AND OFFICE 




Cr. 








Appropriation 






$17,755.00 


Petty Cash Refund 






50.00 


Dr. 








Salary, Superintendent 




$ 5,122.00 




Engineer 




4,345.00 




Clerks 




7,058.92 




Office Maintenance 




1,238.21 




Total Expenditures 


$17,764.13 




Balance to Revenue 




40.87 






$17,805.00 


$17,805.00 


PARK DEPARTMENT 




Cr. 








Appropriation 




$ 


6,182.28 


Dr. 








Labor 




$ 5,104.41 




Rental and Maintenance 








of Grounds 




420.30 





Amount Carried Fomvard $ 5,524.71 $ 6,182.28 

66 



Amount Brought Forward $5,524.71 % 6,182.28 

Equipment and Repairs 637.34 



Total Expenditures % 6,162.05 

Balance to Revenue 20.23 



$ 6,182.28 % 6,182.28 



RECREATION 


Cr. 




Appropriation 


% 9,600.00 


Dr. 




Playgrounds : 




Salaries, Instructors 


% 3,444.00 


Police, Matron and other 




Employees at Dances 


141.00 


Labor 


202.60 


Repairs 


286.65 


Entertainment 


432.98 


Recreational Supplies 


1,220.61 


Pomps Pond: 




Salaries, Lifeguards, 




Matron and Others 


2,393.75 


Transportation 


275.00 


Repairs 


377.54 


Miscellaneous Expenses 


140.61 


Skating : 




Scraping and Flooding 


276.25 


Plowing 


153.00 


Total Expenditures 


% 9,343.99 


Balance to Revenue 


256.01 



% 9,600.00 % 9,600.00 
67 



ARTICLE 27— 1950— EUGENE V. LOVELY PENSION 

Cr. 

Balance from 1950 $ 511.42 

Appropriation 1,842.58 

Dr. 
Pension,Eugene V. Lovely $ 2,354.00 



$ 2,354.00 $ 2,354.00 

ARTICLE 2— SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

PUCHASE LAND ADJACENT TO CENTRAL SCHOOLS 

AND PLAYSTEAD 



Cr. 






Appropriation 




$10,000.00 


Dr. 






Purchase of Land 


$ 5,000.00 




Blueprints 


2.00 




Total Expenditures 


$ 5,002.00 




Balance to 1952 


4,998.00 





$10,000.00 $10,000.00 
PARKING METERS RECEIPTS 

Cr. 

Balance from 1950 $ 8,997.85 

Collections in 1951 10,729.37 

Parking Meters Appropriation Balance 401.99 

Dr. 
Purchase of Parking Meters $ 1,610.60 

Installation of Parking Meters 69.46 



Total Expenditures $ 1,680.06 

Parking Meters 

Appropriation 3,600.00 

Balance to Parking Meters 

Receipts 14,849.15 



$20,129.21 $20,129.21 
68 



ARTICLE 22- 


-ENCLOSING ROGERS BROOK 




Cr. 




Appropriation 


Dr. 


$ 4,750.00 


Labor 


$ 


5.20 


Whiteprints 


$ 


4.50 



Total Expenditures $ 9.70 

Balance to 1952 4,740.30 



$ 4,750.00 $ 4,750.00 

ARTICLE 28— GRADE AND SURFACE ROAD 

TO POMPS POND 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 500.00 

Dr. 
Labor $ 281.01 

Tarvia and Bulldozer 218.99 



$ 500.00 $ 500.00 

DAMAGES TO PERSONS AND PROPERTY 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 500.00 

Dr. 
Damages to Persons and Property $ 167.61 
Balance to Revenue 332.39 



$ 500.00 $ 500.00 

AMERICAN LEGION QUARTERS 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 600.00 

Dr. 
Rent for Quarters $ 600.00 



$ 600.00 $ 600.00 
69 



VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS QUARTERS 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 600.00 

Dr. 

Rent for Quarters $ 600.00 



$ 600.00 $ 600.00 

DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS POST 18 QUARTERS 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 480.00 

Dr. 
Rent for Quarters $ 480.00 









$ 


480.00 


$ 480.00 




INSURANCE 






Appropriation 

Insurance 
Balance to Revenue 




Cr. 
Dr. 


$17,987.74 
12.26 


$18,000.00 




$18,000.00 


$18,000.00 




ARMISTICE DAY 






Appropriation 

Wreaths 

Bugler, Music and £ 

Showing of Film 


Speaker 

mditun 
Reven 


Cr. 
Dr. 

3S 

ue 


$ 


15.00 
36.00 
"75.00 


$ 150.00 


Total Exp< 
Balance to 


$ 


126.00 

24.00 





$ 150.00 $ 150.00 

70 



Cr. 








Appropriation 






$ 1,250.00 


Transfer from Reserve Fund 






75.00 


Dr. 








Bands and Sound Service 


$ 


475.00 




Flowers and Wreaths 




534.80 




Flags, Markers and Ammunition 




187.58 




Transportation and Refreshments 




103.09 




Total Expenditures 


$ 


1,300.47 




Balance to Reserve Fund 




24.53 





$ 1,325.00 $ 1,325.00 



TOWN REPORTS 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 1,312.00 

Dr. 

Printing Town Reports $ 1,312.00 



$ 1,312.00 $ 1,312.00 



TOWN SCALES 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 200.00 

Dr. 

Salary, Public Weigher $ 100.00 

Scale Books 2.75 



Total Expenditures $ 102.75 

Balance to Revenue 97.25 



200.00 $ 200.00 



71 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



Cr. 




Appropriation 

Dr. 

Salary, Chairman, 


$51,994.90 




Board of Public Works 


$ 56.25 


Office Maintenance 


592.81 


Labor 


17,657.68 


Lawrence Gas & Electric Company 


9,574.79 


Pipe, Meters and Fittings 


6,557.93 


Equipment, Hardware and Tools 


1,867.14 


Maintenance, Gasoline and Oil 


297.23 


Chlorine and Lime 


912.00 


Miscellaneous Expenses 


112.00 


Maintenance of Pumping Station 


13,609.57 


Total Expenditures 


$51,237.40 


Balance to Revenue 


757.50 



$51,994.90 $51,994.90 



ARTICLE 1—1950— SUPPLEMENTARY WARRANT 
ENGINE DRIVEN CENTRIFUGAL PUMP 

Cr. 

Balance from 1950 $14,302.25 

Dr. 

Centrifugal Pump $12,834.94 

Balance to 1952 1,467.31 



$14,302.25 $14,302.25 

ARTICLE 18— 1950— WATER DEPARTMENT 
IMPROVEMENTS 

Cr. 

Balance from 1950 $15,501.74 



72 



Amount Brought Fomvard $15,501.74 

Dr. 

Lining Pipe $ 1,957.36 

Labor and Other 226.47 



Total Expenditures $ 2,183.83 
Transfer to Surplus 

Revenue 10,000.00 

Balance to 1952 3,317.91 



$15,501.74 $15,501.74 

ARTICLE 21— 1950— EXTENDING AND IMPROVING 
WATER SYSTEM 





Cr. 






Balance from 1950 


Dr. 




$ 6,934.43 


Labor 




$ 2,453.55 




Pipe, Hydrants, Etc. 




3,641.32 




Tarvia and Tractor Shovel 




625.66 




Blasting and Other 




213.90 





$ 6,934.43 $ 6,934.43 

ARTICLE 21— 1951— EXTENDING AND IMPROVING 
WATER SYSTEM 





Cr. 




J 


Appropriation 


Dr. 




$12,000.00 


Labor 




$ 1,251.53 




Pipe 




7,662.72 




Tractor Shovel 




988.13 




Range Oil and Other 


es 


77.53 




Total Expenditure 


$ 9,979.91 




Balance to 1952 




2,020.09 





$12,000.00 $12,000.00 
73 



ARTICLE 23— ACQUISITION LAND/OR LAND 

AND BUILDINGS HAGGETTS POND 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 1,000.00 

Dr. 
Engineering $ 276.60 

Balance to 1952 723.40 



$ 1,000.00 $ 1,000.00 

ARTICLE 24— 1948— PUMPING EQUIPMENT 

BANCROFT ROAD 

Cr. 

Balance from 1950 $ 5,861.08 

Dr. 
New Pumping Equipment $ 5,116.02 

Labor 245.06 



$ 5,361.08 $ 5,361.08 

SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 
Cr. 

Balance from 1950 $ 2,245.04 

Appropriation 17,382.00 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Interest 2,349.20 

Petty Cash Refund 10.00 

Dr. 
Salary, Superintendent $ 2,630.03 

Clerk 200.00 

Labor 11,406.24 

Office Maintenance 133.24 

Equipment, Tools and Truck Maint. 1,510.55 
Containers 594.55 

Seed, Loam and Gravel 368.34 



Total Expenditures 


$16,842.95 


Transfer to Surplus 




Revenue 


2,245.04 


Balance to Revenue 


2,898.25 



$21,986.24 $21,986.24 

74 



ARTICLE 27— SPRING GROVE CEMETERY ROLLER 

Cr. 



Appropriation 

Purchase Roller 
Balance to 1952 



$ 350.00 



Dr. 



$ 343.00 
7.00 







$ 350.00 


$ 350.00 






INTEREST 




Appropriation 
Interest 




Cr. 

Dr. 

$ 7,927.47 


$ 7,927.47 




$ 7,927.47 


$ 7,927.47 




MATURING DEBT 




Appropriation 
General Loans 




Cr. 

Dr. 

$ 24,000.00 


$24,000.00 




$24,000.00 


$24,000.00 


] 


PREMIUM SCHOOL LOAN 




Premium School Loan 
Premium School Loan 


Cr. 

Dr. 

$ 1,140.00 


$ 1,140.00 



Town Clerk's Dog License Money 
Cemetery Perpetual Cares 
Private Trust Funds 
Purchase of Treasury Bills 



$ 1,140.00 $ 1,140.00 

$ 2,808.00 

4,305.14 

808.85 

640.000.00 



75 



Temporary Loan in Anticipation of Reimbursement 8,625.00 



Investment Funds 
Essex County Tax 
Retirement Fund 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Withholding Taxes 
Defense Bonds 
Blue Cross 
Refunds 

Total Expenditures, 1951 



892.44 

58,899.65 

22,134.00 

3,306.81 

74,794.40 

4,312.50 

6,892.91 

4,866.07 



$2,890,402.26 



RESERVE FUND 
Cr. 



Transferred from Overlay Surplus 




$20,000.00 


Transfer Balances 




151.64 


Dr. 






Memorial Day 


$ 75.00 




Treasurer 


810.50 




Town Clerk 


100.00 




Public Welfare Department 


1,000.00 




Police Department 


2,100.00 




Interest 


23.72 




Snow Removal and Sanding 


1,500.00 




Balance to Overlay Surplus 


14,542.42 






$20,151.64 


$20,151.64 


TAXES 1949 






Balance from 1950 


$ 2,522.61 




Collected in 1951 




$ 2,181.13 


Tax Titles 




83.70 


Abated 




67.05 


Balance to 1952 




190.73 



$ 2,522.61 $ 2,522.61 



76 





TAXES 1950 




Balance from 1950 


$44,042.56 




Refunds 


98.10 




Collected in 1951 




$37,973.62 


Tax Titles 




83.70 


Abated 




539.00 


Balance to 1952 




5,544.34 



$44,140.66 $44,140.66 



TAXES 1951 

Commitments $852,971.68 

Refunds 1,233.50 

Collected in 1951 $800,870.91 

Abated 9,479.66 

Balance to 1952 43,854.61 



$854,205.18 $854,205.18 



ESTATE OF DECEASED PERSONS 

Commitment $ 1,363,57 

Balance to 1952 $ 1,363.57 



$ 1,363.57 $ 1,363.57 



MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE TAXES 1949 

Balance from 1950 $ 49.00 

Collected in 1951 $ 2.00 

Balance to 1952 47.00 



$ 49.00 $ 49.00 

77 



MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE TAXES 1950 
Balance from 1950 $ 5,494.87 

Commitments in 1951 640.11 

Refunds 152.77 

Adjustment .10 

Collected in 1951 $ 5,229.99 

Abated 935.09 

Balance to 1952 122.77 



$ 6,287.85 S 6.287.85 

MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE TAXES 1951 
Commitments $121,127.66 

Refunds 2,960.50 

Collected in 1951 $111,166.17 

Abated 6,933.78 

Balance to 1952 5,988.21 



$124,088.16 S124,088.16 

CLASSIFIED FOREST LAND 

Commitment $ 5.20 

Collected in 1951 $ 2.00 

Balance to 1952 3.20 



$ 5.20 S 5.20 

APPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS PAID IN ADVANCE 

Commitments S 1,208.33 

Collected in 1951 S 1,208.33 



$ 1,208.33 $ 1,208.33 

UNAPPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1949 

Commitment S 40.36 

Collected in 1951 S 40.36 



$ 40.36 S 40.36 
78 



UNAPPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1950 

Balance from 1950 $ 1,785.46 

Apportioned $ 338.30 

Collected in 1951 130.80 

Balance to 1952 1,316.36 



$ 1,785.46 $ 1,785.46 

UNAPPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS ADDED TO 

TAXES 1948 



Balance from 1950 


$ 


9,323.87 




Commitment 




47.59 




Collected in 1951 






$ 704.73 


Apportioned 






5,609.81 


Unapportioned Not Due 






2,632.60 


Abated 






62.82 


Balance to 1952 






361.50 



$ 9,371.46 $ 9,371.46 

UNAPPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS ADDED TO 

TAXES 1949 

Balance from 1950 $11,684.24 

Collected in 1951 $ 3,995.80 

Apportioned 3,869.20 

Abated 43.93 

Balance to 1952 3,775.31 



$11,684.24 $11,684.24 

APPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS ADDED TO 
TAXES 1949 

Balance from 1950 41.12 

Collected in 1951 $ 41.12 



$ 41.12 $ 41.12 

79 



APPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS ADDED TO 
TAXES 1950 

Balance from 1950 $ 33.97 

Collected in 1951 $ 33.97 



$ 33.97 $ 33.97 

APPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS ADDED TO 
TAXES 1951 

Commitments $ 1,789.92 

Collected in 1951 $ 1,677.61 

Balance to 1952 112.31 



$ 1,789.92 $ 1,789.92 



COMMITTED INTEREST ON SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1949 

Balance from 1950 $ 14.62 

Collected in 1951 $ 9.88 

Abated 4.74 



$ 14.62 $ 14.62 



COMMITTED INTEREST ON SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1950 

Balance from 1950 $ 3.05 

Collected in 1951 $ 3.05 



$ 3.05 $ 3.05 



COMMITTED INTEREST ON SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1951 

Commitments $ 567.12 

Collected in 1951 $ 479.10 

Abated 50.54 

Balance to 1952 37.48 



$ 567.12 $ 567.12 

80 



TAX TITLE ACCOUNT 



Balance from 1950 


$ 817.16 




Tax Titles Taken 


195.16 




Tax Titles Disclaimed 
Redemptions 


42.59 


$ 86.94 


Balance to 1952 




967.97 




$ 1,054.91 


$ 1,054.91 



TAX TITLE POSSESSIONS 

Balance from 1950 $ 841.42 

Balance to 1952 $ 841.42 



$ 841.42 $ 841.42 
DEPARTMENTAL ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 



Balance from 1950 


$ 9,556.92 




Charges, Accounts Receivable 






in 1951 


72,812.05 




Refunds 


409.42 




Collected in 1951 




$77,567.44 


Adjustment 




.01 


Abated 




1,035.37 


Balance to 1952 


85.00 


4,260.57 



$82,863.39 $82,863.39 

STATE AND COUNTY AID TO HIGHWAYS 
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Balance from 1950 $ 1,000.00 

Charges to State and County 9,625.00 

Collected in 1951 $ 7,702.08 

State and County Aid to Highways Revenue 34.70 

Balance to 1952 2,888.22 



$10,625.00 $10,625.00 
81 



WATER RATES ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 



Balance from 1950 


$14,009.99 




Commitments, Charges, 1951 


69,804.45 




Collected in 1951 




$ 67,834.30 


Water Liens Added to Taxes 




3,862.84 


Abated 




1.00 


Balance to 1952 




12,116.30 




$83,814.44 


$83,814.44 



WATER SERVICES AND MISCELLANEOUS 
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Balance from 1950 $ 225.64 



Commitments, Charges, 1951 


655.78 




Water Liens Added to Taxes 1949 


13.00 




Collected in 1951 




678.98 


Balance to 1952 


$ 


215.44 



$ 894.42 $ 894.42 
WATER LIENS ADDED TO TAXES 1949 



Balance from 1950 


$ 


940.51 






Collected in 1951 






$ 


895.22 


Water Services and Miscellaneous 










Accounts Receivable 








13.00 


Balance to 1952 








32.29 



$ 940.51 $ 940.51 



WATER LIENS ADDED TO TAXES 1950 

Balance from 1950 $ 738.25 

Collected in 1951 $ 545.55 

Balance to 1952 192.70 



$ 738.25 $ 738.25 



82 



WATER LIENS ADDED TO TAXES 1951 

Commitment $ 3,862.84 

Refund .18 

Collected in 1951 $ 1,808.90 

Abated 82.24 

Balance to 1952 1,971.88 



$ 3,863.02 

OVERLAY SURPLUS 

Balance from 1950 

Overlays 1949-1950 

Reserve Fund Unexpended Balance 

Transferred to Reserve Fund $20,000.00 



3,863.02 



$24,922.63 
12,285.70 
14,542.42 



Balance to 1952 



31,750.75 



$51,750.75 $51,750.75 
OVERLAY 1949 



Balance from 1950 




$ 2,522.61 


Abatements 


$ 67.05 




Overlay Surplus 


2,264.83 




Balance to 1952 


190.73 






$ 2,522.61 


$ 2,522.61 




OVERLAY 1950 




-Balance from 1950 




$16,104.21 


Abatements 


$ 539.00 




Overlay Surplus 


10,020.87 




Balance to 1952 


5,544.34 





$16,104.21 $16,104.21 



Overlay 1951 
Abatements 
Balance to 1952 



OVERLAY 1951 



$27,616.04 



$ 9,479.66 
18,136.38 



$27,616.04 $27,616.04 



83 



SURPLUS REVENUE 

Balance from 1950 $166,193.46 

Unexpended Appropriation Balances 15,678.61 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Interest 2,245.04 

State and County Aid to Highways Revenue 1,965.30 

Aid to Dependent Children Recovery 220.98 
New England Telephone and Telegraph Co. Refunds 115.61 

Tax Title Revenue 86.94 

Public Welfare Reimbursement 8.00 

Tailings, Old Checks 5.12 

Revenue 1951 201,827.97 
Transfer to Revenue $65,000.00 
Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital 1,352.08 
Tax Titles 167.40 
Refund 11.60 
Balance to 1952 321,815.95 



$388,347.03 $388,347.03 



JOHN CORNELL WOOD AND COAL FUND 

Principal Fund 

Andover Savings Bank #13259 Andover $1,000.00 

Essex Savings Bank #82865 Lawrence $1,000.00 

Broadway Savings Bank #13403 Lawrence $1,000.00 

City Inst, of Savings #69782 Lowell $1,000.00 

The Central Savings Bank #21760 Lowell $1,000.00 



$5,000.00 



Receipts 

Balance on Hand January 1st, 1951 $ 667.87 

Interest received during 1951 105.00 

$ 772.87 



84 



Amount Brought Fortvard $772.87 

Expenditures 

Jan. 29, 1951 Cross Coal Co. $25.25 

Nov. 9, 1951 Cross Coal Co. 24.45 



$49.70 Less 49.70 

Balance on hand January 1st. 1952 $723.17 



Respectfully submitted, 



Edward P. Hall, Chairman 
Fred E. Cheever, Treasurer 
Arthur W. Cole 



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Report of the 
Trustees of Punchard Free School 



Year Ending December 31, 1951 

PRINCIPAL FUND 

January 1, 1951 

Cash in Banks $19,985.86 

Real Estate Mortgages 23,994.22 

Bonds at Book Value 33,019.92 $77,000.00 



December 31, 1951 

Cash in Banks $21,106.03 

Real Estate Mortgages 22,874.05 

Bonds at 

Book Value 33,019.92 $77,000.00 



INCOME ACCOUNT 

January 1, 1951 Cash on Hand $ 7,578.55 
Interest 

and Dividends Rec'd. 2,417.18 $ 9,995.73 

Expenditures 

Safe Deposit Box $ 12.00 

Treasurer's Bond 25.00 

E. E. Hammond — Salary 200.00 
Expenditures for 

Punchard Library, 
Commercial Dept., Manual 

Training Dept., etc. 1,931.54 

December 31, 1951 Cash on Hand 7,827.19 $ 9,995.73 



GOLDSMITH FUND 

Jan. 1, 1951 Cash in Savings Bank $ 335.33 
Interest Received 6.73 



Dec. 31, 1951 Cash in Savings Bank $ 342.06 

88 



DRAPER FUND 

Jan. 1, 1951 Cash in Savings Bank $1,506.69 
Interest Received 29.97 



$1,536.66 

Scholarship Awarded 30.00 



Dec. 31, 1951 Cash in Savings Bank $1,506.66 

BARNARD FUND 

Jan. 1, 1951 Cash in Savings Bank $ 28.73 
Dividends Received 40.00 

Interest Received .16 



$ 68.89 
Prizes Awarded 40.00 



Dec. 31, 1951 Cash in Savings Bank $ 28.89 

CHAPIN FUND 
Jan. 1, 1951 Cash in Savings Bank $2,232.58 
Interest Received 44.46 



. $2,277.04 
Scholarship Awarded 40.00 



Dec. 31, 1951 Cash in Savings Bank $2,237.04 

RESERVE FUND 
.Jan. 1, 1951 Cash in Savings Bank $3,736.12 
Interest Received 75.09 



Dec. 31, 1951 Cash in Savings Bank $3,811.21 

HENRY WARREN BARNARD AND MABEL PARADISE 

BARNARD FUND 

Jan. 1, 1951 Cash in Savings Bank $1,104.97 
Interest Received 20.51 



$1,125.48 
Expenditures 84.00 



Dec. 31, 1951 Cash in Savings Bank $1,041.48 

89 



ELIZABETH T. GUTTERSON SCHOLARSHIP 

Jan. 1, 1951 Cash in Savings Bank $1,026.43 
Interest Received 20.62 



$1,047.05 
Scholarship Awarded 20.00 



Dec. 31, 1951 Cash in Savings Bank $1,027.05 

M. E. GUTTERSON BOTANY PRIZES 

Jan. 1, 1951 Cash in Savings Bank $ 310.12 
Interest Received 6.18 



$ 316.30 
Prizes Awarded 5.00 



Dec. 31, 1951 Cash in Savings Bank $ 311.30 

ALICE M. BELL FUND 

Apr. 12, 1951 Cash in Savings Bank $1,000.00 
Interest Received 9.80 



$1,009.80 
Prizes Awarded 20.00 



Dec. 31, 1951 Cash in Savings Bank $ 989.80 

Respecfully submitted, 

Edmond E. Hammond 

Treasurer 

This is to certify that the securities belonging to the 
Trustees of Punchard Free School and the income accuring 
therefrom have been checked and found to be correct. 

The remaining items in the above account are examined 
by the Town Accountant. 

C. C. Kimball 
Roy E. Hardy 
Harry Sellars 

90 



Report of 
Trustees of Memorial Hall Library 



Cash January 1, 1951 


$ 560.50 


Income from Investments 


2,421.00 


Income from Savings Bank Accounts 


168.52 


Income from Contributions, Redemptions, 




or Additions to Principal 


1,419.52 


Total Cash and Income ' 


$ 4,569.54 


Paid Town of Andover 


$ 2,550.00 


Safe Deposite Box Rental 


12.50 


Paid for Lighting Repairs and Changes 


126.98 


Paid for Lighting Repairs and Changes 


29.10 


Paid for "Open House" Lecture and Projectionist 120.00 


Paid for Books 


22.00 


Sum for Reinvestment Account 


1,000.00 


Total Disbursements 


$ 3,860.58 


Balance, December 31, 1951 


708.96 


Arthur W. 


Reynolds 




Treasurer 



91 



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99 



Town Debt 



DETAIL OF PAYMENT BY YEARS 







Junior High 


Elementary 






Sewer 


School 


Schools 




Year 


Rate 4%% 


2&2%% 


ij4% 


Total 


1952 


$5,000. 


$19,000. 


$55,000. 


$79,000. 


1953 


5,000. 


19,000. 


55,000. 


79,000. 


1954 




4,000. 


55,000. 


59,000. 


1955 




4,000. 


55,000. 


59,000. 


1956 






55,000. 


55,000. 


1957 






55,000. 


55,000. 


1958 






55,000. 


' 55,000. 


1959 






55,000. 


55,000. 


1960 






55,000. 


55,000. 


1961 






55,000. 


55,000. 


1962 






50,000. 


50,000. 


1963 






50,000. 


50,000. 


1964 






50,000. 


50,000. 


1965 






50,000. 


50,000. 


1966 






50,000. 


50,000. 


Totals 


$10,000. 


$46,000 


$800,000. 


$856,000 



100 



Board of Retirement Report 






To the Board of Selectmen, 
Andover, Mass. 
Gentlemen : 

The Town of Andover Board of Retirement herewith sub- 
mits the following report for the year 1951 : 
Balance, January 1, 1951 $ 3,364.42 

Receipts, January — December 31, 1951 : 

Deductions, Group I and II $19,159.93 

Interest on Bonds and Stocks 6,099.05 

Appropriation 22,134.00 



$50,757.40 



Expenditures : 

Pensions paid, Group I and II $22,899.87 
Investments 22,197.07 

Refunds, Deductions and Interest 683.98 
Office Expenses, Clerk 1,093.54 



$46,874.46 
Balance, December 31, 1951 $ 3,882.94 

The Total Active Members : 

January 1, 1951 126 

December 31, 1951 130 

January 1, 1951 December 31,1951 

Active Members 126 130 

Pensioners 24 25 

Total Membership - December 31, 1951 155 

During the year $22,000 worth of Bonds were purchased. 
The Securities held at the close of year cost $214,260.65. 
$21,751.26 is the amount recommended to be added to the 
fund by Town appropriation for 1952. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George C. Napier, Chairman 
David L. Nicoll, Secretary 
Edmond E. Hammond 

Board of Retirement 
101 



Treasurer's Report 



Receipts and payments for the year were as follows : 

Balance, January 1, 1951 $ 533,493.25 
Receipts 2,517,472.70 



$3,050,965.95 

Payments 2,250,402.26 



Balance, December 31, 1951 $ 800,563.69 

Of this balance, $409,554.60 is in the Elementary Schools 
Building account, practically all invested in U. S. Treasury 
bills, earning slightly more than the interest the town is 
paying on that portion of its 1J4% bonds, $800,000. of which 
were sold last May. This leaves a balance of $391,009.09 in 
the general fund, which is the figure to be compared with the 
January 1 balance. 

Disbursements were in accordance with 114 selectmen's 
warrants and 17,663 checks were issued. Included in the 
totals above is $74,794.40, withheld from the pay of 308 full 
or part-time town employees for federal taxes. Payroll de- 
ductions for the purchase of U. S. Defense Bonds amounted 
to $4,342.99 and $6,892.91 for Blue Cross and Blue Shield 
dues. 

Cemetery perpetual care and other trust funds, as well as 
the funds of the Retirement Board, all in the treasurer's cus- 
tody, are listed on other pages of this report. The number of 
pensioners increased by one and at the end of the year was 
25. The average monthly pension increased by $4.00 to 
$79.00. 

Tax titles numbered 16 and amounted to $972.54 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thaxter Eaton, Treasurer 



102 



Report of Tax Collector 



POLL TAXES 



Year 

1950 
1951 



Collected 
1951 
$ 10.00 
7,076.00 



Abated 

1951 
5 8.00 
*l f 336.00 



Year 

1949 
1950 
1951 

Year 

1949 
1950 
1951 

Year 

1949 
1950 
1951 



Collected 
1951 
$ 1,743.82 
33,510.01 

683,316.10 



Abated 
1951 



502.20 
7,705.66 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE 



Collected 
1951 
$ 2.00 
5,229.99 
111,166.17 



Abated 
1951 



935.09 
6,933.78 



Outstanding 
Jan. 1, 1952 

$ 48.00 



'Abatements to men over 65 years $964.00 

PERSONAL TAXES 

Collected Abated 

1951 1951 

$ 437.31 $ 67.05 
4,453.61 28.80 

110,478.81 438.00 

REAL ESTATE TAXES 



Outstanding 

Jan. 1, 1952 

$ 171.65 

1,102.81 

5,946.27 

Outstanding 
Jan. 1, 1952 

$ 19.08 
4,441.53 

37,860.34 

Outstanding 

Jan. 1, 1952 

$ 47.00 

122.77 

5,988.21 



MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTIONS 



Water Liens $ 3,262.67 

Sewer Assessments (apportioned) 

Paid in Advance 1,208.33 

Sewer Assessments (apportioned) 1,662.82 

Sewer Assessments (unapportioned) 4,871.69 

Committed Interest on Sewer Assessments 492.03 

Classified Forest Land Tax 2.00 

Interest on Delinquent Taxes 1,456.89 



103 







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104 



Assessors 9 Report 



We herewith submit our annual report : — 
Number of polls assessed 4,203 

Number of persons assessed 3,641 

(real and personal) 
Valuation — personal property $2,909,677.00 



Valuation — real estate 


18,168,090.00 




$21,077,767.00 


Tax on polls $ 


8,406.00 


Tax on personal property 


116,387.08 


Tax on real estate 


726,723.60 




851,516.68 


Apportioned sewer 


1,702.88 


Committed interest 


536.56 


Water liens added to taxes 


3,862.84 


Abatements : — 




Poll taxes 


1,344.00 


Personal Property 


533.85 


Real estate 


8,207.86 


Rate of taxation per $1,000.— $40.00 


Number of assessed 




Horses 


41 


Cows 


559 


Yearlings, bulls, and heifers 


; 134 


Swine 


235 


Fowl 


38,505 


Sheep 


124 


All other 


362 


Number of acres land assessed 


16,852 


Dwellings assessed 


3,246 



Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 
Number of vehicles assessed 5,750 

Assessed Valuation $3,091,390.00 

Excise 121,767.77 

Abatements 7,868.87 

Rate— $46.85 

105 



Additional Assessments 
Number of polls assessed 23 

Number of persons assessed, real and personal 



Valuation — personal property 
Valuation — real estate 
Tax on polls 

Tax on personal property 
Tax on real estate 
Number of acres assessed 



9,100.00 

25,930.00 

46.00 

328.00 

1,037.20 



69.08 



146 



Respectfully submitted, 

Roy E. Hardy, Chairman 
J. Everett Collins 
Sidney P. White 



Municipal Properties and Public Improvements 





Land and 


Equip, and 


Total 




Buildings 


other prop. 




Town Hall 


$ 115,900 


$ 15,150 


$ 131.050 


Shaw Property 


12.000 




12,000 


Fire Department 


92.175 


48.000 


140,175 


Police Department 


600 


2.700 


3.300 


Schools 


2,698.000 


52^00 


2,750.000 


Library 


'212.000 


40.000 


252.000 


Water Department 


135.000 


1,252.892 


1,387.892 


Sewer Department 


2.600 


628.310 


630.910 


Highway Department 


26,200 


70,200 


96.400 


Parks and Playgrounds 


67,175 


6,200 


73.375 


Tree Warden and Moth Departments 




9.200 


9.200 


Infirmary 


80.300 


2.500 


82.800 


Spring Grove Cemetery 


36,350 


1.125 


37.475 


Weights and Measures 




350 


350 


Town Scales 




500 


500 


Old Schoolhouses 


43,750 




43.750 


Punchard School Fund 




84.558 


84.558 


Memorial Hall Investment Funds 




93,054 


93.054 


Burnham Road — land 


2.500 




2.500 


Pomps Pond Bathing Beach 


7.050 


300 


7.350 


Indian Ridge — land 


1.000 




1.000 


Woodland — W T est District 


275 




275 


Public Dump Site 


6,000 




6.000 


Tax Title Possessions 


2,225 




2.225 


Carmel Woods — land 


12.300 




12.300 


Main and Dwight Sts.^land 


5,000 




s;ooo 


Totals 


$3,558,400 


$2,307,039 


$5,865,439 



106 



Board of Public Welfare 



The Board of Public Welfare submits the following report 
for the year 1951. 

During the year 1951, we added 24 cases to our Old Age 
Assistance rolls and dropped 28 through death and other 
causes. We had 40 applications for this form of aid, and of 
these, 16 were found to be ineligible. At the start of 1951 we 
had 183 cases, and we closed the year with 179. The referen- 
dum increasing benefits under the Old Age Assistance law, 
which was passed by the voters in 1950 to become effective 
on June 1, 1951, was disallowed by the Supreme Court. How- 
ever, the 1951 Legislature granted additional benefits to be- 
come effective on January 1, 1952. This Legislature also 
passed a very good law which is effective as of January 1, 
1952, which makes it mandatory that all persons receiving 
assistance as of January 1, 1952, and all future applicants, 
give the town a lien on any real estate they may own. The 
purpose of the lien is to secure repayment of assistance 
granted after January 1, 1952. 

During 1951, the Legislature set up a new form of aid 
called "Disability Assistance", which grants assistance to 
persons who are permanently disabled. The Federal Govern- 
ment will pay part of the expense, and the State and Towns 
the remainder. How far-reaching the law will be is not 
known at the present time. We have had 7 applicants for this 
type of relief, 6 of whom were transferred from General 
Relief. 

Our Aid to Dependent Children form of assistance has in- 
creased by 3 families during 1951, and there has also been an 
increased cost in the budgetary requirements. At the end of 
1951 we were aiding 15 cases. 

Our General Relief form of aid should be decreased this 
coming year, due to the inauguration of Disability Assist- 

107 



ance, but because of the unemployment situation in the local 
mills, we cannot be too hopeful. 

At this time, we wish to thank all citizens and private or- 
ganizations who have assisted our department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Roy E. Hardy, Chairman 
J. Everett Collins 
Sidney P. White 

Arthur W. Cole, Welfare Agent 



108 



Report of Trustees of Spring Grove 
Cemetery 



The Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery submit their an- 
nual report for the year 1951. 

There were seventy-eight interments during the year, 
twenty-one new lots were sold which are all under perpetual 
care. 

The amount of perpetual care for lots sold during the year 
was $3,177.00 dollars. Four old lots were placed under per- 
petual care totalling $465.00 dollars. 

The income from perpetual care funds for the year 
amounted to $2,259.20. Monies received from annual care, 
sale of lots, foundations, interments, etc., amounted to $2, 
403.13. 

Five hundred feet of permanent hard black top road was 
constructed on the East side of the cemetery continuing 
beyond that which was done last year. In time it is hoped 
that all the main roads will be hot topped as it is a needed 
improvement. 

A flag stone walk has been laid thru the plate section 
which is on the East side of the cemetery. Additional curbing 
was installed and a walk around the drinking fountain. 

Three hundred feet of the stone wall along Abbot Street 
has been pointed up. 

Trees and shrubbery have been pruned and trimmed. 
One half of the tool house has been reshingled. 
The cemetery needs a chapel tent to be used in inclement 
weather and the Trustees hope same will be provided under 

an article in the Warrant. 

On November 24th, our faithful superintendent, Jesse E. 
West died suddenly, after serving thirteen years in a most 
efficient manner. 

109 



Nelson Townsend was appointed superintendent for the 
following year. 

The Trustees voted to spread on their records the follow- 
ing resolutions : 

Whereas, Jesse E. West, superintendent of Spring Grove 
Cemetery for the past thirteen years, was called 
by death November 24th, 1951. 

Resolved, that we record our deep sympathy in his passing 
and wish to express our appreciation for his 
long, faithful and valuable services. 

Be it further Resolved, that a copy of these resolutions be 
spread on the records of the Trustees of Spring Grove 
Cemetery and that a copy be sent to his family. 

Frank R. Petty, Chairman 
Fred E. Cheever, Secretary 
Albert E. Curtis 
Malcolm Lundgren 
Clifford E. Marshall 

Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery 



110 



Office of Veterans' Service 



As we submit our eighth annual report on Veterans' Ser- 
vices and Rehabilitation, we see an ever increasing number 
of folders in our files on the Korean Campaign Veterans. All 
men and women serving in the U. S. Armed Forces after 
June 27, 1950, will be considered Veterans of Korea and will 
participate in many benefits similar to those accorded World 
War II veterans. Servicemen are being discharged each week 
and will continue to be discharged, unless some unforeseen 
event demands their retention beyond the date of their en- 
listment period. 

July 25, 1951, marked the dead line for most of the World 
War II Veterans' Educational and Vocational Training un- 
der the G. I. Bill. These benefits will continue in a few ex- 
ceptional cases and will be extended, on a modified scale, to 
the new veterans. 

Despite the fact that we are experiencing slack periods in 
local textile employment, the monetary demands on this 
office were less than anticipated for the year. This enabled 
us to return to free cash a substantial unexpended balance. 
We cannot look forward to the coming year with any degree 
of optimism in textile employment and expect our case load 
in this field to be greater. 

Hospital and medical bills were somewhat lower this year, 
but will increase in 1952 due to the passage of Chapter 753 
of the General Laws of Massachusetts which extends free 
medical care and hospitalization to all mothers of deceased 
veterans of any war or insurrection who died of injury or 
disease sustained or contacted in service. This law becomes 
effective on January 28, 1952. 

Veterans' Benefits and Veterans' Rehabilitation cover a 
very diversified field of domestic and marital problems plus 
innumerable Federal benefits and State monetary assistance. 
The case load in all categories was approximately Twenty- 
one Hundred with State Veterans' Benefits, Pensions, Com- 
pensations, Medical, and Hospitalization, Insurance, Edu- 

lll 



cation and Employment leading all other classes in our ser- 
vice. 

All local Veteran Organizations participated in the re- 
burial here of two Korean dead. Other veteran deaths during 
the year were: World War I — eleven; Spanish War — two; 
British War Veterans — one. 

One of the most important services offered by this office is 
making photostatic copies of all Honorable Discharges. One 
copy is given to the veteran and the second copy retained in 
our files for future use. Many World War I and returned 
Korean veterans have never requested this service. It is a 
most important one for their benefit, especially in time of 
sickness or death, and we urge all who have not brought 
their papers here for photostatic purposes to do so as soon as 
possible. 

We wish to express our sincere thanks and appreciation 
for the cooperation and assistance received during the year 
from all Andover Veterans' Organizations, the Home Service 
of the Red Cross Chapter, the Welfare Department, all Town 
Departments, the Andover Service Club, and all other bene- 
volent and charitable groups. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Roy E. Hardy, Chairman, Board of Selectmen 
J. Everett Collins 
Sidney P. White 

Francis P. Markey, Agent 
Office of Veterans' Service 



112 



Third Annual Report of the Andover 
Housing Authority 



Nineteen Hundred and Fifty-one was our first full year of 
occupancy of the fifty-six homes by Andover veteran 
families. Rent collections were very good. A few tenants 
have fallen behind and the Veterans' Service Office has 
helped these tenants in emergencies. Our rent collections are 
almost 100 percent, and we do not anticipate any losses. 

There has been a very low turnover. In most cases 
the turnover has been in situations where the veteran has 
purchased or built his own home. This is a healthy sign as 
the Development was built with the thought that veterans 
and their families would use these homes as a temporary 
measure until they could build or purchase their own homes. 

There is still a need for housing among low-income veter- 
ans and their families. The Authority has many applicants to 
fill vacant apartments as the high cost of home building or 
home purchasing still places home ownership beyond the 
reach of the lower income veterans. The selection for vacan- 
cies is a difficult one, but nevertheless, the Authority would 
like all veterans needing homes to continue to file applica- 
tions so that vacancies will go to the most needy families of 
Andover veterans. 

A good deal of the time was spent during the year in the 
final completion of the Development according to the plans 
and specifications. Corrections were made in the heating 
system and further corrections are planned to provide satis- 
factory heat at all times when needed. The seeding and 
planting has been completed. Minor deficiencies in carpentry, 
plastering and painting have all been corrected. The Author- 
ity is of the opinion that we now have a Development as ori- 
ginally planned but no effort will be spared to continue to 
make further needed improvements where necessary. 

Our Manager, James E. Manning, has been doing a splen- 
did job. He has worked with the veteran families, and he re- 

113 



ports splendid cooperation from the tenants in maintenance. 
All Andover people who have seen the Development from 
the outside will bear this out. The members of the Authority 
and the people who have had the privilege of visiting at the 
various homes during the year know that the same standard 
of maintenance is being carried out on the inside. 

The Authority expects to sell its permanent bonds some- 
time in April, 1952. After these bonds are sold, a complete 
management budget will be in operation with a reserve 
being built up to take care of periodic painting, further 
maintenance needs, and any vacancy or collection losses. 
Last year the Authority made a payment in lieu of taxes to 
the Town in the amount of $289.87. This year the payment 
in lieu of taxes based on the State Housing Board approved 
formula of 5 percent of rents after deducting charges for 
heat and electricity will be about $1250. A deduction for 
electricity for the street lighting in the amount of $140 will 
be made because the Authority is paying for street lighting. 
That deduction was required by the State Housing Board on 
the basis of the five overhead lights at $28 per year which 
the Town was willing to provide. Actually, the Authority has 
seven street lights as a part of the underground electricity 
system. 

A complete financial statement as of December 31, 1951, 
is attached. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Stanley F. Swanton, Chairman 
Ernest N. Hall, Vice Chairman 
Winthrop Newcomb, Treasurer 
Franklin Haggerty, Asst. Treas. 
Charles G. Hatch, Member 



114 



DEVELOPMENT FUND 

Balance Sheet — December 31, 1951 

ASSETS 

Cash — Development Fund 

Andover National Bank $12,121.10 

Bay State Merchants National 3,223.33 

$ 15,344.43 

U. S. Treasury Bills 40,000.00 

Development Cost 646,042.90 



$701,387.33 

LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL 
Acc't Payable — Contract Retentions $ 19,429.51 

Notes Authorized — Temporary $670,000. 

Less Unissued 25,000. 

645,000.00 



Unamortized Premium on Notes 10,398.00 

Interest Accrued — Temporary Notes 26,230.00 

Unearned Discount on Treasury Bills 329.82 



$701,387.33 



ADMINISTRATION FUND 
Trial Balance — December 31, 1951 



Administration Fund — Cash 


$22,124.27 




Security Deposit Fund — Cash 


544.00 




Accounts Receivable Tenants 


248.50 




Tenants Security Deposits 




$ 544.00 


Dwelling Rent Schedule 




45,391.79 


Prepaid Rents 




122.00 


Management Salaries and Expense 


1,290.51 




Operating Services 


1,112.86 




Utilities 


12,561.80 




Repairs, Maintenance, Replacements 


3,178.31 




General Expense 


4,997.54 





$46,057.79 $46,057.79 
115 



Board of Appeals Report 



To the Board of Selectmen : 

The Board of Appeals under the Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Andover has the following members: James S. 
Eastham, Chairman, term expiring May 1, 1952; Roy E. 
Hardy, Secretary, term expiring May 1, 1953; Edward P. 
Hall, term expiring May 1, 1954; and two associate mem- 
bers, Leon A. Field and Walter C. Tomlinson, terms expiring 
May 1, 1952. 

During the year 1951, the sixteenth year of the Zoning By- 
Law, the Board heard and decided fourteen cases as follows : 

Petition of Garabed Dargoonian, decided on February 5, 
1951, for permission to erect and maintain a gasoline and oil 
filling station on property owned by him at 199 North Main 
Street. Denied 

Petition of Irving G. Clark, decided on February 5, 1951, 
for a variance from the Zoning By-Law with respect to the 
erection of a garage within 15 feet of the east side lot line on 
the property owned by him and his wife, Esther J. Clark, at 
11 Appletree Lane. Denied 

Petition of Marjorie Stearns, decided on April 2, 1951, for 
permission to convert a two-family house owned by her at 12 
Locke Street into a three-apartment house. Granted 

Petition of Esther Bredbury, decided on April 2, 1951, for 
permission to alter and extend the building owned by her at 
the corner of Poor and Lowell Streets for business purposes. 

Denied 

Petition of George Hird, decided on April 30, 1951, for 
permission to use a building on his property at 100 Lowell 
Street as a general store. Denied 

Petition of John J. Higgins and Ruth F. Higgins, decided 
on April 30, 1951, for permission to erect a house on their 
property at 46 Lowell Street with side yards of less than 15 
feet. Denied 

Petition of Sidney P. White, decided on June 11, 1951, for 
permission to erect a roadside stand and dairy bar on his 

116 






property on the south side of Lowell Street for the purposes 
of selling farm products, ice cream, and other manufactured 
products. Granted for Sale of Farm Products Only. 

Petition of Raymond J. Dobbin and Vivien M. Dobbin, 
decided on May 28, 1951, for permission to construct a ga- 
rage on property owned by them at 34 Enmore Street with a 
front yard of less than 30 feet. Denied 

Petition of Philip J. Coffey, decided on June 18, 1951, for 
permission to construct a garage on property owned by him 
at 36 Maple Avenue with a side yard of less than 15 feet. 

Granted 

Petition of Charles B. Roberts, decided on August 6, 1951, 
for permission to convert a two-family house owned by him 
at the intersection of North Main, Ferndale, and Poor 
Streets being numbered 400-402 North Main Street, into a 
four-apartment house. Granted 

Petition of Edward T. McFarlin and Margaret H. McFar- 
lin, decided on September 10, 1951, for permission to convert 
a two-family house owned by them at 95 Elm Street into a 
three-apartment house. Granted 

Petition of Esther Bredbury, decided on September 21, 
1951, for permission to alter and extend the building owned 
by her at the corner of Poor and Lowell Streets for business 
purposes similar to those previously conducted on the pre- 
mises. Granted 

Petition of Ruth L. Lauder, decided on October 1, 1951, for 
permission to construct a garage on property owned by her 
husband, Gordon B. Lauder, and her at 46 Enmore Street 
within 20 feet of a private way. Denied 

Petition of Charles W. Arnold, decided on November 5, 
1951, for permission to construct a garage on his property at 
88 Central Street within 15 feet of the side line of his pro- 
perty. Denied 

Respectfully submitted, 

James S. Eastham, Chairman 
ROY E. Hardy, Secretary 
Edward P. Hall 



117 



Report of Planning Board and Board 
of Survey 



The following Public Hearings were held by the Planning 
Board during the year 1951 : 

February 2 — For approval of a plan of land off the east- 
erly side of Woodland Road for the purpose of subdivision 
and opening a private way for public use on petition of 
Josephine E. Lumsden. This plan was approved and recom- 
mended for acceptance. 

May 11 — For approval of a plan of land off the easterly 
side of Highland Road for the purpose of subdivision and 
opening for public use on petition of Frederick H. Smith. 
No action could be taken on the plan as presented. The peti- 
tioner was requested to bring a complete set of plans before 
the Board. 

May — Petitioner Ruth Stevens was represented by Carl 
Stevens for approval of a plan on Virginia Road for the pur- 
pose of a change in lot area and increasing the width of a 
proposed way. This plan was approved and signed. 

May 25 — A proposed amendment to the Town Zoning By- 
Laws rezoning a section of land at the corner of Lowell and 
Poor Streets in Shawsheen Village from a residential dis- 
trict to a business district. After due consideration of all 
factors surrounding this proposed amendment, the Board 
recommends that it be rejected by the Town. 

June 22— On petition by the Selectmen for the approval of 
a plan of Carmel Road Extension by the Town Infirmary. 
This plan was approved and recommended for acceptance. 

September 28 — For the approval of a plan of land east of 
Enmore Street on petition of the Andover-Shawsheen Realty 
Company for the purpose of subdivision and opening a pro- 
posed way for public use. It was voted to approve the plan 

118 



provided the completed plan indicated a joining of the pro- 
posed way and the present point of acceptance on Dufton 
Road. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sidney P. White, Chairman 
Walter C. Tomlinson, Secretary 
Leon A. Field 
Frederick E. Cheever 
Kirk R. Batcheller 

Edward R. Lawson, Clerk 






119 



Report of Recreation Committee 



The Andover Recreation Committee submits its report for 
the year 1951. 

For the first time since the inception of playground activi- 
ties in Andover, the entire Recreation Department 
functioned under one administrative head. Due to the recall 
to the U. S. Navy of Mr. Donald D. Dunn, formerly super- 
visor at Pomps Pond, Mr. James D. Doherty assumed charge 
of playgrounds and also of Pomps. Mr. George Snyder was 
appointed assistant supervisor of playgrounds and Mr. 
Richard Kydd was made head life guard at Pomps Pond. 
This new setup worked out in a very satisfactory manner 
and Mr. Doherty and his staff are to be commended on a 
very successful season. 

Playgrounds 

Five playgrounds were operated throughout the town with 
a personnel of twelve instructors. The attendance figures 
were as follows : Central 14,528 ; Ballardvale 15,058 ; Indian 
Ridge 5,690; Shawsheen 3,333; and West Centre 2,783. 

Central Playground was temporarily located on the east 
end of the Park because of the traffic menace and other con- 
struction problems caused by the building of the new school. 
The annual Canobie Lake Picnic attracted 324 children and 
the First Annual Field Day was held at Central with 300 
participating. 

Pomps Pond 
Personnel consisted of the head life guard and five assist- 
ants with a matron on duty during the daytime. Daily bus 
service from various sections of the town on a regular time 
schedule was maintained through the season. The raft at 
Pomps must be replaced this year. The usual Life Saving 
classes were conducted and the Annual Water Carnival was 
very successful and was enjoyed by a large audience. The at- 
tendance for the season was 40,476. 

120 



Skating 
Skating has been and will be enjoyed at the Ballardvale 
Rink, Sacred Heart School Rink, and Phillips Academy 
where they have offered the facilities of the new Sumner 
Smith Rink. Skating on the Playstead at Central was can- 
celled this season due to the construction of the new school. 

Easter and Halloween Activities 
These two annual events now take a very prominent part 
in the recreational program. The Easter Egg Hunt was the 
usual successful event. Halloween brought an innovation re- 
garding parties. Three or four enthusiastic and well attend- 
ed meetings were held prior to this event. Representatives 
from all Parent Teachers Associations, all Veterans' Organ- 
izations. Police and Fire Departments, High and Junior 
High Schools, St. Augustine's School Guild, Andover Youth 
Center, and the Andover Service Club attended these meet- 
ings and brought to the committee many good suggestions. 
Separate parties were requested by Ballardvale, Indian 
Ridge, and the North District. All other sections participated 
in the party at the Memorial Auditorium. The Girls' High 
School Band led the Halloween Parade and did an exception- 
ally fine job for which we extend our deep appreciation. 

The playground and swimming season will be extended for 
an additional week in 1952 due to the demand that activities 
run through the entire month of August. 

The Playground Parents Associations in the various 
sections where play areas are available have, through their 
generous financial assistance, enabled the committee to pur- 
chase some heavy equipment for installation for the coming 
year. This equipment, ordered two years ago, has just ar- 
rived, the delay in shipment being caused by the shortage 
and priority on steel. The committee is grateful to the mem- 
bers of these associations who conduct parties and carnivals 
and turn the money over for the purchase of playground 
equipment. 

Acknowledgments 
All organizations — veteran, civic and social — mentioned 

121 



previously in this report have helped to a great extent to 
make our 1951 season so successful and our work as com- 
mitteemen a pleasure. To all, individually and collectively, 
we express our sincere thanks and appreciation. 

Stafford A. Lindsay, Chairman 
Francis P. Markey, Secretary 
Alan F. Dunlop 
George A. Stanley, jr. 
Alco E. Taylor 



122 



Andover Town Infirmary 

January 1, 1952 

Board of Selectmen, Andover, Mass. 
Gentlemen : 

The annual report of the Town Infirmary for 1951 is given 
herewith : 

We have given board and room to thirteen persons during 
the year, ten of whom are still with us. The other three went 
to live elsewhere. The first of the year 1951, we had some 
sickness, two of our members having to go to the hospital, 
one for blood transfusions, which could not be given here. 
However, aside from colds and a few minor ailments, the 
residents of the Infirmary are well, as of the present date, 
but all are elderly and liable to sicknesses at any time. The 
house is warm and the food is good which helps maintain 
their health. Two elderly persons were admitted to the home 
during the year. 

During the year there was considerable repair work done. 
Several of the rattan chairs the men use in the basement 
were worn through and were recaned. Last year the men's 
floor was painted, and this year the women's corridor and 
rooms were done over and new plastic draperies bought in 
pretty colors, also spreads for the beds. Repair work to the 
old refrigerator was done, also to one of the washing ma- 
chines, and a vacuum cleaner was bought to replace the one 
which had been in use for 15 years. One of the chimneys was 
pointed up and straightened. Toward the end of the year 
the roof of the barn was shingled, and the floor of the 
residents' dining room was re-laid with plastic tile. The last 
two items were asked for, for this year, but the Selectmen 
thought they could be paid for out of the 1951 budget. New 
front steps to the house were made and painted. 

Mrs. Doyle, the State Inspector was here in June and gave 
the Andover Infirmary a very good report in her letter to the 
Welfare Board. 

123 



As usual organizations and individuals have been very 
good to us especially at Christmas. This year the November 
Club members sang carols and gave readings when they 
came to visit, the Thursday before Christmas and all the 
folks came up to the living room and joined in. Christmas 
greetings and gifts also were contributed by the Abbot 
Academy Christian Association, the King's Daughters, the 
Garden Club, the Sacred Heart Sodality, and two groups of 
carolers, besides many individuals. The visits to these elderly 
people who cannot get out so much in the winter weather 
are most appreciated and the Matron thanks one and all who 
gave of their time and money to bring joy to the shut-ins. 

During the year the lot of land across from the Infirmary 
was sold to James Buss, who has built a house there and is 
occupying it at present. 

Number of Inmates, January 1, 1951 11 

Number admitted during year 2 

Number discharged during year 3 

Number of Inmates, January 1, 1952 10 

Number between 50 and 60 years 2 

Number between 60 and 70 years 2 

Number between 70 and 80 years 4 

Number between 80 and 90 years 2 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mary C. Edmands, Matron 



124 



Fire Department 



January 28, 1952 
To the Board of Selectmen, 

Andover, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to submit my eleventh annual report as 
Chief of the Andover Fire Department. 

During the year 1951 the department answered the follow- 
ing alarms ; 60 bell ; 165 still ; total 225. 

Assessed value of buildigs where fires occured was — 
$1,170,325.00. 

Loss in buildings where fires occured was $42,935.61. 

Ambulance calls for the year totaled 706, of which 540 
were answered by the Cadillac Ambulance, 37 by the Henney 
Ambulance, 43 by the Chief's car, 72 by Lt. Cole's car, 11 by 
the Jeep, 1 by Wilson Crawford's car and 2 by Miss Barbara 
Loomer's car. 

• Power burners inspected 280 ; range burners 195 ; liquefied 
petroleum gas systems 40 ; Total 515. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. Edward Buchan, Chief 
Andover Fire Department 
Andover, Mass. 



125 



Police Department 



January 29, 1952 

Board of Selectmen 
Andover, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen : 

I hereby submit my report of the Police Department for 
the year ending December 31, 1951. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George A. Dane, 

Chief of Police 

DISPOSITION OF CASES 

Convicted in District Court 56 

Convicted in Juvenile Court 9 

Convicted in Andover Trial Justice Court 95 

On File— District Court 3 

On File — Trial Justice Court 14 

Released by Probation Officer 38 

Dismissed 1 

Turned Over to Out of Town Police 4 

Turned Over to Army Authorities 2 

Sentenced to House of Correction 19 

Sentenced to Bridgewater 1 

Fines Paid in District Court $987.00 

Fines Paid in Andover Trial Justice Court $798.00 

Miscellaneous complaints received and investigated 468 

Summons served for Out of Town Police 54 

Automobiles stolen in Andover 2 

Automobiles recovered in Andover 5 

Bicycles stolen in Andover 9 

Bicycles recovered in Andover 14 

Breaks in Camps and Dwellings 6 
Doors in Business District found open and secured 104 

Lost children returned to Parents 4 

126 



Runaway children returned to parents or institutions 17 

Dogs killed by automobiles 14 

Dogs gassed by Police 2 

Street lights reported out to Lawrence Gas Co. 593 

Dogs lost and returned to owner 11 

Number of persons bitten by dogs 34 
Board of Health and Animal Inspector notified on 

Dog bites 34 

Cattle lost and returned to owners 14 

Dead bodies cared for by police 6 

Suicides reported and investigated by police 3 

Persons notified for out of town police 12 

Tramps put up for night in lock-up 4 

Dwelling houses inspected while owners away 183 

Articles found and returned to owners 12 

Summons served on local complaints in Andover 27 

Missing persons reported, located and returned 7 

Highway conditions reported to B. P. W. 12 
Tree Dept. notified of Limbs and Trees down in streets 5 

Persons taken to Danvers State Hospital by Police 7 

Persons taken to Hospital by Police in Cruisers 7 

Hens killed by Dogs, Investigated by Police 127 

False Alarms of Fire investigated by Police 1 

Burglar Alarms set off and investigated by Police 4 

Bell Alarms of Fire covered by Police 60 

Autos ordered towed to Garage 9 

Cards sent to Registry of Motor Vehicles 47 

Arrests made for out of town Police 1 

Breaks-Business District 8 

Fatal Automobile accidents in Andover 2 

License to operate motor vehicle suspended or revoked by 
Registry of Motor Vehicles for violations in Andover. 
Residents of Andover 41 

Non Residents of Andover 32 



127 



Board of Health Nurse and Agent 



December 31, 1951 

To the Board of Health and Toivnspeople of Andover 

I herewith submit a brief report as Board of Health Nurse 
and Agent for the Town of Andover for the year 1951. 

1951 1950 1949 



Diptheria 











Encephalitis 











Dog Bite 


45 


26 


39 


Tuberculosis 


3 


3 


1 


Scarlet Fever 


19 


17 


5 


Chicken Pox 


19 


82 


116 


Whooping Cough 


8 


12 


4 


Measles 


16 


2 


257 


Mumps 


72 


6 


79 


Syhilis 


3 


3 


3 


Gonorrhea 








1 


Infections Jaundice 





1 





Meningitis 


4 








Anterior Poliomyselitis 





2 


2 


Salmonella 








2 


German Measles 


48 


2 


7 


Totals 


237 


156 


516 


Deaths from Contagious Diseases 






Influenzal Meningitis 


1 








Pulmonarl Tuberculosis 


1 


2 


1 


Bacillary Dysentery 












Totals 2 2 1 

In 1952, Andover will continue to hold free clinics. Among 

these will be the Diptheria and Tetanus Toxoids innocula- 

tions for children entering school, the Baby Clinic and the 

Anti-Rabic Clinic for Dogs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lotta M. Johnson, R. N., R. S. 

128 



Milk Inspector's Report 



To the Townspeople of Andover : 

I submit herewith a brief summary of the activities of my 
office for the year ending December 31, 1951. 

The following licenses have been granted and fees for 
these licenses have been turned over to the Town Treasurer 
whose receipt I hold : 

Milk and Cream — 71 (an increase of 1 over 1950) 

Oleomargarine — 25 (an increase of 8 over 1950) 

Ice Cream and Frozen Desserts — 3 (one less than 1950) 
Pasteurization of Milk — 5 (same as 1950) 

It is interesting to notice the large number of oleomarga- 
rine licenses which is the largest number in the history of 
this office. We have also increased the number of milk licen- 
ses granted by fifty per cent since assuming office in 1947. 

During the year, 54 samples of milk and eight samples of 
cream were analyzed for butter fat and total solids. In ad- 
dition, eight of these samples were tested for formaldehyde 
by the Hehner test and six were assayed for total bacterial 
count at my Boston laboratory. All samples were within 
state and local specifications. Reports of these tests were 
sent to all distributors. 

- Periodic inspection trips were made to all establishments 
under my jurisdiction. 

On December 1, all producers operating under license 
from this office were sent the following regulation relative 
to antibiotics: Important: Milk from treated segments of 
udders should be discarded or used for purposes other than 
human consumption for at least 72 hours after the last treat- 
ment. It is hoped that all producers will abide by this regu- 
lation as it is a matter of their cooperation rather than one 
that can be enforced by supervision. 

Each year, the duties of this office become more numerous. 
Everyone in this town can and everyone should cooperate 

129 



with us in an effort to keep our people free from epidemics 
that might be spread by milk as well as by other sources. I 
hope that all of our citizens will report any infraction of the 
milk and cream laws to my office. It is our duty as elected 
or appointed officials to enforce the laws pertaining to public 
health. It is the duty of all of the citizens in this or any other 
community to help us in our work. 

Respectfully, 

Robert A. Walsh, Milk Inspector 



130 



Report of Building Inspector 

January 16, 1952 

Board of Selectmen : 
Andover, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

During the year of 1951 I have issued One Hundred and 
Ninety (190) permits for the erection of New Buildings at 
an estimated building cost of Two Million Eight Hundred 
Five Thousand Eight Hundred and One Dollars ($2,805,801. 
00). 

I have also issued One Hundred and Twenty (120) per- 
mits for additions and alterations at an estimated building 
cost of One Hundred Seventy Six Thousand Four Hundred 
and Seventy Five Dollars ($176,475.00) making a total 
building cost of Two Million Nine Hundred Eighty Two 
Thousand Two Hundred and Seventy Six Dollars ($2982 
276.00). 

The permits for New Buildings are classified as follows — 
Single Residences 127 

Single Car Garages 19 

Two Car Garages 13 

Three Car Garages 1 

Six Car Garages 1 

Trailer Residences 4 

Camp 1 

Tool Houses 5 

Schools 2 

Pig Shelters 1 

Oil Storage Tanks 2 

Gasoline Storage Tanks 2 

Ware Houses 1 

Vegetable Wash Room 1 

Green Houses 2 

Storage Sheds 2 

Summer Houses 1 

131 



Wood Working Plant 1 

Barn 1 

Wood Shed 1 

Hen Houses 2 

This Department has collected in fees and turned over to 
the Town Treasurer Three Thousand Two Hundred Seven 
Dollars and Fifty Cents ($3,207.50) 

I have made Fifteen Hundred and Sixty Two (1562) in- 
spections during the past year. 

Respectfully yours, 

Ralph W. Coleman, Building Inspector 



Report of Wire Inspector 



Board of Selectmen 
Andover, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen : 

I hereby submit my report for wiring inspections for the 
year 1951. 

Number of wiring inspection permits 435 
Number of fixture inspection permits 39 



Total 474 

Amount collected and turned over to Treasurer, Town of 
Andover, $474.00. 

Respectfully submitted, 
William J. Young, Inspector of Wires 

132 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 



December 31, 1951 

To the Board of Selectmen of the Totvn of Andover 
Gentlemen : 

I hereby submit my annual report for the year 1951 : 
Work performed from Jan. 1, 1951 to Dec. 31, 1951 inclusive 
Scales, Weights, Gasoline meters, Vehicle tank systems etc. 
Adjusted Sealed Not Sealed Condemmed 

Total 60 612 3 3 

Other Work Performed 

Complaints investigated 4 
Trial weighings and measurements of commodities 

put up for sale 601 

Other inspections : Pedlars, oil & coal certificates etc. 599 

Total collections for the year 1951 were $275.10 (Two 
Hundred Seventy-Five Dollars and Ten Cents) . 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph Serio, Sealer 



133 



Report of Tree Warden 

January 1, 1952 
To the Citizens of Andover : 

Young trees of the desired planting size were in short 
supply last spring and good specimens hard to obtain. 

Nurserymen report that this condition may continue for 
several years as few trees were started in the tree nurseries 
during the war years and a heavy demand recently from new 
homes and developments have caused the shortage. 

Poison ivy control along our roadsides was continued 
through the generousity of the Andover Village Improve- 
ment Society in furnishing the Tree Warden with nearly 
$300.00 worth of chemicals. 

This work extended to nearly all parts of the town. Many 
roadsides, once a mass of poison ivy are now practically free 
of this dangerous plant due to control measures taken in the 
past several years. 

Excessive rainfall in 1951 brought the moisture in the 
soil back to normal after several years of drouth in which 
many trees suffered because of injury to their root systems. 
Until the roots recover, dead twigs and branches are likely 
to develop in these trees. 

Modern paved roads and walks excluding moisture and 
air, contribute greatly to adverse effects on our public street 
trees by drouth, storms, insects and disease. 

For more efficient tree work I recommend the purchase of 
an electric saw which can be taken into the trees for pruning 
or removing branches from the top before falling a tree 
that is to be removed. 

These saws are light in weight and are operated from a 
portable generator on the ground. A flood light can also be 
operated from the generator, at the same time, when tree 
work is necessary during storms at night. 

The National Shade Tree Conference comes to Boston in 
1952 during the week of August 18th. 

This group is composed of individuals actively engaged in 

134 



the care, preservation and growth of shade trees, research, 
instruction etc. Members come from all parts of this country 
Canada and some foreign lands. They discuss, gather and 
distribute information on the latest approved methods in the 
care of trees. 

A great change for the better in safety, usefulness and ap- 
pearance of our roads has been made possible since 1945 by 
clearing of our roadsides next to the traveled way of brush 
and weeds by our tractor mower. 

This equipment, a war time product, is worn out and 
should be replaced at once with a modern tractor and mower. 

For the Tree Wardens Department I recommend an ap- 
propriation of $12,675.00 to provide for the following budget 
Wardens Salary $ 1,876.00 

Labor 9,290.70 

Gasoline, Oil, Tractor, Power Saws and Truck 

Maintenance 740.00 

Rent of Shop & Garage 210.00 

Trees, Loam & Fertilizer 200.00 

Hardware and Tools 200.00 

Telephone, Printing and all other items 158.30 



$12,675.00 
George R. Abbott, Tree Warden 



135 



Report of Moth Superintendent 

January 1, 1952 

To the Board of Selectmen 
Totvn of Andover 

Gentlemen : 

Leaf chewing insects were well controled on our public 
trees in 1951. 

The Fall web worm is another insect which has been added 
by the Legislature to the list of insects declared to be public 
nuisances. 

To continue the regular moth department work in 1952 I 
recommend that $8, 655.00 be appropriated. 



The Dutch elm disease is serious and widespread to nearly 
all parts of the town. 

Tests of samples sent to the laboratory showed ninety-five 
trees to be infected with the disease. Of this number sixty 
diseased trees were removed and the remaining thiry-five 
elms must be destroyed before April 1st. to prevent possible 
spread of the disease from these trees. 

The Moth Superintendent believes the best protection of 
our elms from the disease by spraying is by helicopter from 
overhead and by mist blower from underneath. This seems 
to be borne out in the towns of Marblehead, Swampscott, 
Lynnneld, Wakefield, Reading and Lexington where several 
hundred of the more valuable elms in each town were 
sprayed by this method. The town furnished the insecticides 
and the helicopter cost was about one dollar per tree. 

Research men have developed several chemical compounds 
which when washed into the ground or sprayed on the leaves 
gave promise of protecting healthy elms. This work must be 
carried on over several seasons before practual results can 
be obtained. These compounds have not been placed on the 
market for this reason. 

136 



Our gasoline chain saws have aided the department great- 
ly in the cutting up and removal of diseased trees. 

Purchase of heavy equipment should be considered for 
handling heavy logs and tree trunks in the removal of these 
diseased trees. The increased amount of heavy tree removals 
is a great strain and wear on our present equipment. If 
stumps are to be removed or cut out an air compressor 
should be purchased. 

The increased number of diseased trees and the necessary 
prompt removal before they become a menace requires a 
larger appropriation in 1952. 

I recommend that $8,000.00 be appropriated for Dutch 
Elm Disease in the coming year. 

George R. Abbott, Moth Superintendent 



137 



Report of Civil defense Agency 



It is my privilege to submit to the townspeople the first 
annual report of the Civil Defense Agency of the Town of 
Andover. 

The towns and cities throughout the State have been sepa- 
rated into three categories : 1. Target areas ; 2. Neutral areas 
and 3. Reception areas. Andover is in group 3, a reception 
area, and we have the responsibility of providing mobile sup- 
port to the Target areas and the shelter, feeding, clothing, 
and complete care of some 6,000 evacuees from the Target 
Areas. 

It has been my endeavor to put "first things first" and to 
establish these units which we would be most likely to need. 
However, in attempting to do this, your Civil Defense 
Agency has faced, from the start, the almost insurmountable 
handicap of insufficient funds. Never has the old saying that 
"you don't get something for nothing" been more appropri- 
ate. It is the opinion of your Director that the townspeople 
should make a definite decision on the question of Civil De- 
fense. If such an agency is not needed, it should be abolished 
and the unnecessary expenditures saved. On the other hand, 
if it is needed, adequate funds should be made available to 
operate the department in a proper and efficient manner. 

To help us determine the future, let us look more closely 
at the several divisions of Civil Defense : 
Public Warning System : To establish an air raid warning 
system that could be heard in all parts of town would cost 
several thousand dollars. Since the total appropriation for 
Civil Defense last year was less than $8,000., it is obvious 
that a complete warning system was out of the question. The 
next best solution was to determine the centers of greatest 
population and provide warnings for those areas. For- 
tunately, they contain mills, fire stations, power plants, etc., 
which have their own whistles installed. The agents of these 
properties have agreed to the use of such whistles for public 
air raid warnings. 

138 



Air Raid Shelters : Again, we are indebted to private pro- 
perty owners, this time for the use of their buildings as air 
raid shelters. In April of 1951, ten basements were desig- 
nated for this purpose and official Civil Defense shelter signs 
posted to indicate their location. On May 25, 1951, one of the 
first air raid tests in the state was held with considerable 
success locally and much favorable publicity for the town 
throughout the New England area. 

Civilian War Aid : Andover is designated by state author- 
ities as a "reception area" for Boston, Worcester, or any 
other target area, except the Merrimack Valley target. In 
this case, we are a "mutual aid" area. 

Shelter : During the past year, a survey has been made of 
all buildings that might be suitable for emergency shelter 
space. Our survey shows that we have quarters for about six 
thousand people in spaces such as lodge rooms, churches, 
gymnasiums, garages, school buildings, etc. This figure does 
not include the number of evacuees that might be sheltered 
in private homes. 

Registration and Information : Every shelter building must 
have a registration and information section with a complete 
filing system. Each of our designated shelters has a basic 
staff already assigned, but not nearly enough for full oper- 
ation. 

Food and Clothing : No stockpiling of food or clothing has 
been attempted. However, a survey of local conditions shows 
. a sufficient amount of these items carried in stock by mer- 
chants to last for three or four days, after which supplies 
will be brought in through regular channels as needed. All 
feeding will be done in places equipped for mass feeding, 
such as the High School cafeteria, Phillips Academy Dining 
Hall, etc. These places already have trained and experienced 
personnel, augmented by Civil Defense volunteers. 
Communications : This is one of the more expensive divi- 
sions for which to provide equipment. It has been my prac- 
tice, insofar as possible, to buy equipment that can be use- 
ful to other town departments at the expiration of Civil 
Defense. Our local air raid warning system has been ex- 
plained, but before any warning can be given here, instruc- 

139 



tions to do so must come by radio over the State Police 
broadcasting system. In order to receive the "alert warning" 
a radio receiver was installed at the Central Fire Station 
last Fall.The reasons for selecting this location are two-fold : 
first, because there are men on duty 24 hours a day 7 days a 
week; and second, because the fire alarm system is part of 
the local warning system. 

Any organization to work efficiently, must have a specific 
source of control. We are now in the process of establishing 
a radio network for that purpose. At present the Control 
Center is in Civil Defense headquarters in the Town Hall. 
Fire : Interest in the Auxiliary Fire Division has, to date, 
been somewhat lacking. Our force at this writing is rather 
small, but present indications are for rapid growth. We are 
fortunate in having two good auxiliary trailer pumps. It is 
planned to equip these units with hose, nozzles, and other 
such equipment this year so that two complete engine corn- 
panes, including men, will be available for service to the 
town. 

Medical and Health : As shown on the organizational plan, 
Medical and Health has 12 sub-divisions. We have been in- 
structed by state authorities to establish in the town one 
first aid station and one bleeding center. Locations and key 
personnel have been designated for both. In the absence of 
space for a detailed report on each sub-division, I shall sim- 
ply state that the local medical profession and the Board of 
Health have made very satisfactory progress involving much 
effort and time on their part. 

Police : The first duty of the police is the "protection of life 
and property." With this thought in mind, the Auxiliary 
Police was the first Civil Defense Division to be organized 
and trained. We now have 76 fully trained and equipped aux- 
iliary policemen, with 52 of them holding first aid certificates 
For several months now, each regular police officer on early 
night duty has been accompanied by an auxiliaryman. 
Air-Ground Observers Corps : This corps is under the di- 
rect authority of the Eastern Air Defense Command. Your 
local Civil Defense Director feels it is only fair to the mem- 
bers of the Observers Corps to include a summary of their 

140 



activities in this report. The Andover Post is one of the few 
having a perfect record of operation since the reorganizing 
of the Corps. Since its beginning, we have manned the Post 
full time for 9 tests and reported a total of 208 planes of all 
kinds, requiring a total of 252 man hours of duty. 
Red Cross : During the past 18 months, no organization or 
group of people have been more cooperative or more helpful 
to Civil Defense than the Andover Chapter of the American 
Red Cross. It is impossible here to report in detail all they 
have done. One illustration of their work must serve as an 
example of what they have accomplished. Early in 1951, we 
had in Andover less than a dozen trained first aid personnel 
and, in a town of 13,000 people, only two qualified first aid 
instructors. One year later, at town meeting time, the num- 
ber of first aid certificate holders exceeds 400 and we have 
more than 50 qualified instructors. 

In conclusion, I must repeat that only a brief outline is 
given here. Space will not permit an accounting of all the 
paper work, surveys, personal contacts, and other such time 
consuming requirements. 

Although much has been done, there still remains much to 
do. I take this opportunity to express my sincere thanks and 
appreciation to all those who have given of their time and 
effort to such an extent that the Andover Civil Defense 
Agency is among the best in the state. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Albert Cole, jr., Director of Civil Defense 



141 



Town of Andover • 

JUNE, 1951 



Jury List 



Anderson, Ernest E. 
Andrew, T. Edwin Jr. 
Bailey, Samuel H. Jr. 
Barnard, Elizabeth F. D. 
Barnard, W. Shirley 
Barrett, John S. 
Barrett, Joseph F. 
Beedie, Alexander 
Belul, Fedi 
Berry, Ralph T. 
Bird, William F. 
Blake, Preston H. 
Blake, Winston A. 
Blomquist, Bror G. 
Blunt, Thomas D. 
Brouillard, Joseph 
Brown, George B. 
Burke, Sarah J. 
Butler, Anna 0. 
Cairnie, Henry 
Campbell, George W. 
Chadwick, Harry 
Chadwick, Nathaniel 
Chambers, Arthur S. 
Cheney, Paul M. 
Clark, Myron H. 
Clark, Wilbur T. 
Clough, Harry E. 
Collins, Florence I. 
Comber, Joseph 
Connor, Joseph W. 
Cookson, Francis R. 
Curtis, Albert E. 
Darby, James J. 
Denoncourt, Roland 



Farmer Ballardvale Rd. 

Real Est. & Ins. 14 Riverina Rd. 
Retired 33 Morton St. 

Housewife 14 Cabot Road 

Real Estate 12 High St. 

Clerk 63 Burnham Rd. 

Salesman 102 Chestnut St. 

Janitor 8 Elm St. 

Rubber Worker 109 Pine St. 

Cloth examiner 83 Pine St. 

Salesman 12 Canterbury St. 

Food Broker 7 Stratford Rd. 
Food Broker 5 Stratford Rd. 
Electrician 49 Union St. 

Merchant Marine 70 Salem St. 
Painter Bailey Rd. 

Shipper 29 Main St. 

Undertaker 390 No. Main St. 
Housewife 72 Poor St. 

Shipper 120 No. Main St. 

Ins. Agent So. Main St. 

Janitor 34 Avon St. 

Clerk 4 Main St. Terr. 

Farmer Lowell St. 

Ins. Adjuster 83 Maple Ave. 
Mgr. Consultant 30 Chestnut St. 
Guard 6 Liberty St. 

Ins. Agent 117 Chestnut St. 

Housewife 38 Maple Ave. 

Signal Operator Center St. B. V. 
Gas Station Prop. 20 Elm Court 
Photographer 123 Main St. 

Banker 15 Cedar Rd. 

Salesman 125 Main St. 

Chauffeur 93 Abbot St. 



142 



Disbrow, Herbert 
Doherty, William R. 
Drolet, Henry E. 
Dufton, George F. 
Dunbar, Mary C. 
Dunnells, Mabel R. 
Eastman, Floyd, W. 
Easton, Craig B. 
Eaton, Lucy A. 
Ellis, Franklin T. 
Ellison, Arthur N. 
Emmons, Grace G. 
Fairweather, James D. 
Fallon, Joseph E. Jr. 
Flather, Frederick Jr. 
Gagne, Dorothy F. 
Gahm, George L. 
Gaskill, John G. 
Gilcreast, Cleveland 
Gilf oy, Elven W. 
Gill, Joseph M. 
Gilman, Albert E. 
Godfrey, Harold T. 
Golden, William H. 
Gouck, Harry 
Gray, Claremont I. 
Greenwood, Ralph L. 
Hadley, Ralph E. 
Hamblet, William P. 
Hardy, Frederick C. 
Harnedy, William A. 
Haselton, George E. 
Hickey, Vincent P. 
Hill, Marion E. 
Hill, William R. 
Hodge, Robert 
Holland, Robert C. 
Jacques, Robert G. 
Johnson, Howard B. 



Farmer 

Insurance 

Real Estate 

Contractor 

Housewife 

At home 

Clerk 

Retired 

Housewife 

Dresser 

Farmer 

Housewife 

Caretaker 

Accountant 

Mfgr. 



Chandler Rd. 

21 Harding St. 

Lowell St. 

7 Argyle St. 

53 Phillips St. 

103 Abbot St. 

83 Chestnut St. 

36 Walnut Ave. 

49 Abbot St. 

109 Elm St. 

Ballardvale Rd. 

50 York St. 

15 Abbot St. 

58 Maple Ave. 

45 Abbot St. 



H. wife & Treas. 5 Kensington St 

Retired 23 William St. 

Minister Lowell St. 

Egg. Mgr. 23 Bartlett St. 

Mechanic 29 Summer St. 

Carpenter 16 Cuba St. 

Watchman Lowell St. 

Salesman 33 Pasho St. 

Farmer 22 Carmel Rd. 

Clerk 10 Burnham Rd. 

Clerk 34 Washington Ave. 

Operative Tewksbury St. 

Retired 30 Wolcott Ave. 

Draftsman 62 Chestnut St. 

Operative 46i/ 2 High St. 

Asst. Mgr. 101 Elm St. 

Insurance 11 Cheever Circle 

Accountant 232 No. Main St. 
Purchasing Agent 93 Central St. 

Storekeeper 72 Salem St. 

Retired 74 Chestnut St. 

Cost Acct. 120 Chestnut St 

Retired 69 Maple Ave. 

Engineer 66 Carmel Rd. 



143 



Jones, Arthur W. 
Kearn, Frederick J. 
Kelley, Sherwood W. 
Killorin, Karl 
Kinsman, Leslie S. 
Kress, Fred 
Krinsky, Morris 
Lawrence, Camille 
Lindsay, Edith F. 
Lindsay, Stafford A. 
Livingston, Clinton Rd. 
Livingston, Delia M. 
Livingston, George F. 
Luce, Rowland L. 
Markey, Gertrude M. 
Marshall, Clifford E. 
McCarthy, Frank G. 
McFarlin, Margaret H. 
Monan, Joseph C. 
Monro, Frances 
Mooar, Mary R. 
Mooar, Philip C. 
Morehouse, W. Ray 
Morgan, Norman 
Nelson, Edward J. 
Newman, Winthrop R. 
Newton, Charles M. 
Noss, Frederick B. 
Noyes, Lee E. 
Noyes, May L. 
O'Connell, Charles H. 
O'Connell, John F. 
O'Connor, Michael J. 
Patterson, Willard H. 
Pendleton, Andrew S. 
Peters, Howart J. 
Peterson, Elmer 0. 
Petrie, Alexander B. 
Petrie, John P. T. 



Clerk 98 Main St. 

Carpenter Haggetts Pond Rd. 
Salesman 16 Coolidge Rd. 

Real Estate 77 Main St. 

Marine Engineer 18 Summer St. 
Lowell St. 



Operative 

Junk Dealer 

Cashier 

Housewife 

Salesman 

Florist 

Housewife 

Farmer 

Furniture 

Housewife 

Cashier 

Contractor 

Housewife 

Tel. Co. Tester 



41 Elm St. 

4 Lewis St. 

Lincoln Circle 

Lincoln Circle 

Andover St. 

Brown St. 

Brown St. 

19 Summer St. 

48 Chestnut St. 

22 Pasho St. 

12 Wolcott Ave. 

95 Elm St. 

7 Argyle St. 



Housewife 105 Chestnut St. 

Housewife Lowell St. 

Mechanic Lowell St. 

Service Mgr. 124 Chestnut St. 

Poultryman Lowell St. 

Retired 99 High St. 

Clerk 121 Elm St. 

Poultryman Boutwell Rd. 

Minister 62 Elm St. 
Lumber Yd. Mgr. 53 Whittier St. 

General Work 19 Love joy Rd. 

Plumber 95 Chestnut St. 

Counsellor 1 Punchard Ave. 

Chauffeur 49 Elm St. 
Machinist 64 Red Spring Rd. 

Poultryman Dascomb Rd. 

Printer 79 Elm St. 

Poultryman Greenwood Rd. 

Gardener 51 Bartlet St. 

Gardener 53 Bartlet St. 



144 






Piper, Gladys M. 
Pitman, Douglas B. 
Poland, William 
Purdon, Frank L. 
Quinn, Peter D. 
Rafton, Helen G. 
Robb, David B. 
Robbins, Ralph I. 
Robertson, Foster G. 
Rogers, Irving E. 
Ronan, William A. 
Schofield, James F. 
Sellars, Harry 
Shaw, Clinton D. 
Sherry, Richard A. 
Shorrock, Bessie R. 
Smith, Arthur J. 
Smith, Frederick C. 
Smith, Geraldine P. 
Stack, Robert A. 
Stedman, Herbert D. 
Stevenson, Henry J. 
Stone, Robert L. 
Sutton, Osborne 
Taylor, Thomas D. 
Teichert, Frederick H. 
Thomas, Horace R. 
Thomson, James G. 
Tucker, Charles H. 
Wade, Kenneth E. 
Wade, Albert H. 
Ward, Everett 
Ward, Roswell E. 
Weeks, Clarence H. 
West, Howard 
Wetterberg, Carl A. 
Wetterberg, Glennie P. 
Whitcomb, Irving J. 



Burler 29 Canterbury St. 

Accountant 78 Salem St. 

Clerk 37 High St. 

Ret. Army Officer 65 Central St. 
Plumber 44 River St. B. V. 

Chemist & Housewife Alden Rd. 
Janitor 32 Park St. 

Mech. Engr. 55 Red Spring Rd. 
Caretaker 7 Canterbury St. 

Publisher Sunset Rock Rd. 

Chauffeur 60 Morton St. 

Loomfixer 11 Tewksbury St. 

Selling Agent 5 Avon St. 

Salesman Wildwood Rd. 

Chauffeur River St. B. V. 

Housewife 8 Maple Ave. 

Bricklayer Rattlesnake Hill Rd. 
Insurance 6 Stratford Rd. 

Housewife 20 Johnson Rd. 

Operative 20 Summer St. 

Florist 78 Lowell St. 

Mech. Eng. 68 Cheever Circle 
Contractor So. Main St. 

Candy Maker 119 Chestnut St. 
Machinist 79 Lowell St. 

Mfgr. West Knoll Rd. 

Retired 15 Memorial Circle 

Operative 42 Summer St. 

Operative 11 Abbot St. 

Carpenter High St. B. V. 

Retired 91 Lowell St. 

Insurance Agent 72 Park St. 
Salesman 2 Brechin Terr. 

Commercial Agent 66 Chestnut 
Power House Haggets Pond Rd. 
Janitor 53 Summer St. 

Housewife 53 Summer St. 

Ins. Salesman 36 Central St. 



145 



White, Frederick Salesman 196 Shawsheen Rd. 

Whiteside, Charles B. M. Pur. Agent 165 Shawsheen Rd. 

Williams, Richard L. Inspector 173 Lowell St. 

Young, William J. Electrician 44 Elm St. 

Zalla, Eugene Ship. Clerk 3 Cheter St. B. V. 

Zecchini, John A. Salesman County Rd. 



146 



Trustees and Staff of Memorial 
Hall Library 



CAROLINE P. LEAVITT LEO F. DALEY 
E. DEAN WALEN ARTHUR W. REYNOLDS 

JOSEPH SERIO WILLIAM N. PERRY 

ALAN R. BLACKMER 

Chairman 
ARTHUR W. REYNOLDS 

Secretary 
WILLIAM N. PERRY 

Treasurer 
LEO F. DALEY 

Librarian 
MIRIAM PUTNAM 

MARGARET D. MANNING, Assistant Librarian, in 
charge, Readers' Services 

MARGARET LANE, Children's Librarian 

MARY F. ZECCHINI, Catalog and Reference Librarian 

ELEANORE G. BLISS, Circulation Assistant* 

CAROLYN S. BENDROTH, Secretarial Assistant 

M. ETHEL ZINK, Branch Librarian, Ballard Vale 

Janitor 
ARCHIBALD D. MACLAREN 

* Part-time 

147 



THE MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY SERVES LIBRARY 
AND COMMUNITY GROUPS 

Last year the Memorial Hall Library report stressed the 
value of the library's service to individuals in a world which 
is increasingly complex and impersonal. There is another 
aspect of the library's role in the life of a community and 
that is its relation to organized groups both within and with- 
out the library. Important things sometimes happen to 
people in such small groups and it is because of this that it 
seems worth-while to think a little about this side of the 
library's program. 

Very often these days some one will say, "but I am only 
one individual, what does it matter what / think.?". This 
sense of frustration in the face of swiftly moving events is 
understandable. The library can help to combat this feeling 
through its readers' advisory service and through the group 
opportunities which it sponsors and which it serves. Group 
experience of the right kind has a therapy value for the in- 
dividual which may help to restore his confidence in himself 
and in the worth of his own thinking. 

Reading by oneself is a creative process often resulting in 
a ferment of ideas and in changed opinions; but it is not 
always so. Sometimes an individual needs to test his ideas 
and to have them challenged by his peers. A book discussion 
group or a great issues group can provide this opportunity 
for, rightly conducted, it can stimulate him beyond his ac- 
customed performance and often can provide him with 
better materials than he seeks out for himself. Many people 
tend to read in a groove until something comes along to jolt 
them out of it. An elderly woman, a member of a Great 
Books group in another community, told a librarian discus- 
sion leader, that she had never know that such books existed 
until she joined the group. Up to that time she had been con- 
tent to read only the lightest type of book. The fact that 
reading habits may be improved gives added weight to the 
group experience. 

The desirable small group is the one in which no one lec- 
tures, in which perhaps nothing is neatly solved, but rather 

148 



one in which the individual contributes to the best of his 
ability to a mutual exploration, with diversity of opinion, of 
basic ideas and issues. This does not say that there are no 
values in other types of groups, but that it is of this kind 
particularly that many people have need today. 

The Great Books Group 

An example of a creative activity is the Great Books 
group. The library's Great Books group, organized early in 
1951 with volunteer leadership, has attracted some twenty- 
five people, enough of whom have attended with sufficient 
regularity to indicate that it has meant something to them. 
Something quite tangible has happened to these individuals 
in the weeks in which they have been meeting together. They 
are able to think more clearly and to express themselves 
more easily ; they read better and more quickly ; they take a 
more challenging attitude toward other printed material; 
they are more tolerant of ideas other than their own. 

Great Men and Great Issues 

Another example of a working group is one which meets 
bi-weekly at the Ballard Vale Branch Library, exploring 
basic issues in our American Heritage. This group, organ- 
ized to test an experimental film-discussion project, devel- 
oped by the Fund for Adult Education, using special discus- 
sion materials and biographical films, is one among fift}^ 
others in the United States which will help in the final evalu- 
ation of the program. 

Mothers Meet to Discuss Problems 

The Great Books group and the Great Men and Great 
Issues group were in large part library inititiated. Another, 
the mothers' discussion group grew out of the library's pre- 
school story hour. It is unique in that it developed out of a 
need which these mothers felt to discuss problems common 
to all. Its flourishing condition is evidence that need is a 
sound basis upon which to build. 

149 



Ideas in Music, Painting, on Film 

The library is primarily concerned with ideas as they are 
communicated through the printed page. However, it is quite 
aware that there are other important ways of communica- 
tion — through musical notation, through the artist's media, 
through concepts on film. 

This past winter a small group of people met for six suc- 
cessive weeks at the library to become better acquainted 
with chamber music. Interesting examples of this musical 
form were played and were accompanied with illuminating 
comment by the series leader. A high point was an evening 
of "live music" provided by a string quartet. 

The purchase from library funds of a Bogen record player, 
a fine instrument, should increase the amount of music 
listening by individuals and groups in the library building. 

A second Film Festival in early spring featured once more 
important 16mm films on human relations, the arts, music, 
nature and current problems. Attendance varied with the 
subjects, but those who attended regularly were enthusiastic 
about the film evenings. 

A lending picture collection of framed reproductions of 
fine arts prints will be available early in 1952. This has been 
made possible through a gift of two hundred dollars from the 
Andover Evening Study Program, whose previous gifts to 
the library have given impetus to other special services. This 
service is primarily for individuals yet its inclusion here 
seems suitable since it has been made possible by a com- 
munity group. 

Group Activities for Boys and Girls 

Group activities for boys and girls supplement the work 
with children and their parents which forms such an im- 
portant part of the function of the Young People's Library. 

Film and story hours in a somewhat more dramatic 
fashion bring an awareness of creative literature to the 
reading boy and girl as well as to those whose reading in- 
terests have not been fully awakened. 

A summer puppet making activity in which twenty-five to 

150 



thirty boys and girls participated flowered into a full- 
fledged puppet program with a puppet theater and a core 
of young puppeteers which has performed on a number of 
occasions this past fall to the great delight of hundreds of 
boys and girls. 

Instruction in the use of the library and its resources was 
given by the Young People's Library to all the ninth grade 
English classes. With the addition of a full-time school libra- 
rian to the junior and senior high schools, the Memorial Hall 
Library will no longer continue this activity. However, it 
seems probable that a cordinated course of instruction will 
be worked out so that boys and girls during their school 
years will become so familiar with books and libraries that 
it will be second nature for them to use them throughout 
their adult lives. 

Ballard Vale Has Group Activities, Too. 

The Ballard Vale community with the addition of a story 
hour every other week for the three, four and five year olds 
now has a relatively complete library activity program for 
boys and girls from the smallest to those of high school age. 
Film and story hours reaching two different age groups 
have been carried on there for a number of years through 
the cooperative efforts of the library and the Ballard Vale 
Parent-Teacher Association. 

A Small Meeting Room Needed 

Small groups demand a more intimate and informal 
setting than that provided by the library's Memorial Hall, 
useful as it is for large meetings. For example, the hall's 
acoustics are so poor that unless the viewing audience is 
large, film projection falls far short of what it should be. 
Since films are an integral part of the library's program, a 
small meeting room with proper acoustics, capable of seating 
groups of from twenty-five to fifty people, is desirable. It 
would have many other uses, too, and plans to convert an 
almost unused second floor store-room into a many purpose 
meeting room are already in the making. 

151 



The Library and Community Groups 

The library's relationship to groups within the library 
building has already been explored. However, it is equally 
important that the library should work with existing groups. 
There are several ways of doing this. It can take an active 
role in developing a program for a community agency or it 
may work in a more ancillary fashion providing study ma- 
terials, book lists, book exhibits. It can join forces with 
other community groups in putting on programs which often 
will be more effective than if each group worked inde- 
pendently of the other. 

A few examples will suffice to show different ways in 
which the library works with local organizations. 

This fall in cooperation with the American Legion Post, 
two film programs, part of a series to run throughout the 
year, were worked out. The library helped to select the films, 
booked them, loaned projection equipment, arranged book 
exhibits, introduced the films and helped to lead discussion. 

Four hundred people in school, church and community 
groups saw the United Nations films which the library 
booked for use during United Nations week. Many more 
people saw these films than if their showing had been re- 
stricted to the library building. 

The outstanding garden exhibit at the Addison Gallery in 
June, primarily an undertaking of the Andover Garden club 
and the Gallery, provided the library with yet another op- 
portunity to share in a community enterprise. It's contribu- 
tion to the project was the arranging of a garden book ex- 
hibit and the compiling of two book lists for distribution. 

Sometimes the library serves in other ways than with 
books, films, exhibits and book lists, although it often follows 
that a group which makes one use of the library may return 
to it for others. 

For some groups the library serves as a meeting place ; for 
instance, the newly organized Andover Board of Trade holds 
its monthly meetings here. However, we are confident that 
as the Board of Trade grows in strength and usefulness in 
the community the library will find still other ways of 

152 



serving it. Business information and specialized services, 
cooperatively owned and available to Andover business men 
and women, might very well be located in the library. 

Special book shelves have been set aside for courses, for 
Civil Defense materials and for League of Women Voters 
study groups. This is one more way in which the library can 
and does help group projects. 

The library in some way then touches the life of the com- 
munity at almost every point and in return the community 
helps to extend the library's usefulness. An individual may 
have just the kind of know-how that a library user needs; a 
special agency can satisfy a reader's quest for information 
more effectively than the library ; an organization may bring 
delight to many library borrowers, young and old, and the 
Andover Garden Club did through the lovely flower arrange- 
ments which it provided from time to time during the library 
year. 

Other Things Happened, Too 

So far this report has discussed the year just past in terms 
of the library's work with groups. However, there are other 
aspects of its activity in 1951 which deserve brief mention. 

Book Exhibits Within the Library 

Well-conceived book exhibits are an excellent way to bring 
significant books to the attention of library users. This fall, 
for example, a series of book displays on the theme The 
American Heritage In Time Of Crisis brought together a 
wealth of material on the many-sided American scene. Dis- 
plays of all types take time to arrange ; yet it is time well- 
spent if interest in books and ideas is promoted. Many libra- 
ry users, too, speak about the exhibits and of how much 
they add to the library's vitality. 

Massachusetts Libraries One Hundred Years Old 

In May public libraries throughout the state celebrated 
the one hundredth anniversary of the permissive law which 

153 



allowed cities and towns to use tax money for the support of 
public libraries. As part of its observance, the Memorial Hall 
Library trustees played host to library trustees in the Mer- 
rimack Valley region. As public libraries go into their second 
one hundred years, it is appropriate to give special consider- 
ation to the development of regional library service which, 
in its way, is as important to library health in 1951 as was 
the enabling act to the fostering of community libraries in 
1851. 

Open House, 1951 

Open House is always a gala event looked forward to by 
Library Staff and Board alike as a day when they are in- 
formally at home to the Andover community. This year it 
was particularly successful due in large part to our dynamic 
speaker, Mrs. Bradford Washburn, whose talk illustrated 
with film and colored slides, captivated a capacity audience 
of young and old alike. 

The Library Broadcasts Its Wares 

The library appeared on the Pacific Mills radio program 
early in September and presented informally the many ways 
in which public libraries serve individuals. The astonishing 
number of comments on the broadcast was reassuring evi- 
dence that people actually listen to a local program of this 
kind. 

The Library Staff Participates 

This past year saw more than usual participation on the 
part of staff members in community groups and in meetings 
and committee work of professional organizations. 

Library Board Changes 

The make-up of the Library Board underwent its first 
change in several years with the resignation of Winsor Gale 
as chairman and member. His resignation was accepted with 
great regret and with appreciation of the fine contribution 

154 



that he has made to the library and through it to the com- 
munity. Arthur W. Reynolds succeeded him as chairman, 
and Joseph Serio was appointed to fill his place on the Board. 

The Library Shines Forth 

The library may have been a dimly lighted corner on Elm 
Square, but since early September it is that no longer for the 
installation of modern fluorescent lighting fixtures has 
transformed the library reading rooms to a point where both 
literally and figuratively they shed forth light ! 

The Young People's Library got a long over-due redecor- 
ating with the result that, painted a light peach, with over- 
head pipes concealed so far as possible, warmth and light 
have been brought to a northerly room. 

Last year's generous gift from the Andover Village Im- 
provement Society was used to improve the library grounds 
with planting including a yew hedge at the rear of the build- 
ing and soil-holding shrubs and vines on the terraces. 

The Library and Ideas 

Despite the emphasis which this report has placed on 
group activities, it is the individual in all his diversity and 
uniqueness, which he need not lose as a member of a group, 
who continues to be the library's primary concern. This in- 
dividual has continued to seek the library out for books 
about himself, his world, his work, his home, his leisure and 
has used its reference service to find information that he 
needed. Library users borrowed for home use in 1951 the 
largest number of books, magazines, pamphlets and record- 
ings in the history of the library. 

The library's interest in books and ideas is paramount yet 
it knows that wrongly used, they can lead man to terrible 
ends. The public library seems peculiarly fitted to foster that 
use of books and ideas which can help people to satisfy hu- 
man aspirations, to discover their own stature in a world 
grown so terribly impersonal and to make this world a pro- 
per place for all men's continuing development. 

155 



The Library Thanks the Many Who Served It 



In closing a word of appreciation should go to those who 
contributed in some way to the library during the year : to 
the men and women who gave of their time and energy to 
leadership of library groups ; to the newspapers for their full 
coverage of library activities ; to the Andover Evening Study 
Program for another gift of two hundred dollars; to the 
Futterman Trust for an additional gift of fifty dollars for 
the purchase of recordings; to the countless others whose 
gifts and kindnesses have meant much and, not least, to the 
members of the Library Board and Staff who have shared in 
the vision of what the library is and can become in this com- 
munity. 



1951 STATISTICS OF LIBRARY USE 



BOOK STOCK 

Adult 
Volumes at beginning of year 37,386 
Volumes added by purchase 1,511 

Volumes added by gift 110 

Volumes lost or withdrawn 1,552 

Lost Volumes found 4 



Juvenile 

9,890 

811 

15 

324 

1 



Total volumes at end of year 37,459 10,393 

Newspapers and Periodicals currently received 
Periodicals received by gift 



Total 

47,276 

2,322 

125 

1,876 

5 

47,852 



USE 



Volumes of Adult Fiction loaned 
Volumes of adult non-fiction loaned 
*Number of childden's books loaned 
Number of adult records loaned 
Number of children's records loaned 
Number of pictures loaned 



Volumes 

42,426 

32,421 

38,645 

5,603 

1,209 

490 



144 
35 

% of total 

Circulation 

35.1 

26.8 

32.0 

6.1 



Total number of books, records, etc. 

loaned 120,794 

156 



REGISTRATION 

Adult Juvenile Total 
Borrowers registered during the year 607 331 938 
Total number of registered borrowers 3,410 1,560 4,970 
Circulation per capita (based on 1950 census figures) 9.7 

* Included in this total is 8953 recorded school circulation. 
Total books sent on school deposit numbered 9011 and each 
of these books was probably used from two to seventy times. 
The library, however, counts only recorded circulation. 



157 



Board of Public Works 



Andover, Mass. 
January 1, 1952 

The Board of Public Works voted to adopt the following 
reports of the Superintendent and Engineer as its reports 
for 1951 with recommendations for 1952. 

Sidney P. White, Chairman 

Alexander H. Henderson, Secretary 

John H. Kelly 

P. Leroy Wilson 

Victor J. Mill, jr. 



158 



Superintendent's Report 



To the Board of Public Works : 

Gentlemen : 

The major activities and developments in the Highway, 
Water, Sewer, Park and Street Lighting Departments 
during the year which ended December 31, 1951 were as 
follows : 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

The following table in inches shows the snowfall for the 
year 1951 : 

January 12.0 Inches 

February 5.4 Inches 

March 4.2 Inches 

November Trace 

December 11.5 Inches 



Total 33.1 Inches 

The snowfall for the season November 1950 to March 1951 
inclusive totaled 24.7 inches. 

The following road surfaces were treated with tar mix 
and honed: Chandler Road, Bellevue Road, Brown Street, 
Haggetts Pond Road, Pleasant Street, Bailey, Road, Love joy 
Road, Henderson Avenue, George Street, Yale Road, Cornell 
Avenue, Dartmouth Road, Princeton Avenue, Clark Road, 
Andover Street, Hall Avenue, Chester Street, Oak Street, 
Center Street, Tewksbury Street, Marland Street, Juliette 
Street, Enmore Street, High Street, Central Street, Morton 
Street, Pasho Street, Summer Street, Chestnut Street, Bea- 
con Street, Woodland Road, Salem Street, Jenkins Road," 
Webster Street, Brook Street, Cuba Street, Lupine Road, 
Red Spring Road, Boston Road, Pine Street, Washington 
Avenue, Johnson Road, Coolidge Road, North Street, Carmel 
Road, Walnut Avenue, Cabot Road, Punchard Avenue, Hid- 

159 



den Road, County Road, Orchard Street, Elm Street, Kenil- 
worth Street, Railroad Avenue, Maple Avenue, York Street, 
Virginia Road, Pomps Pond Road, Spring Grove Road, Mar- 
wood Drive, Gould Road, Lincoln Circle, Bancroft Road, Holt 
Road, Shipman Road, Reservation Road, Wildwood Road, 
Flint Circle, Harding Street, Dale Street and Blanchard 
Street. 

A total of 102,890 gallons of tar was applied. 

Article 15 covered work done with Chapter 90 Mainte- 
nance funds wherein the Town supplied two thirds and the 
State one third of the cost of $3,000.00. Sections of Lowell 
Street and Haverhill Street. Route 133 and sections of River 
Road were armor-coated with RC-5 asphalt and pea stone. 
Also a section of Haverhill Street was treated with MC-3 
asphalt. The joints in the cement portions of Union Street 
and Haverhill Street were sealed with Genasco asphalt. 

Article 16 covered work accomplished with the aid of 
Chapter 90 Construction funds, half of which was supplied 
by the State, one quarter by the County and one quarter by 
the Town. A section of Lowell Street at Argilla Road was 
reconstructed to improve the sight distance. This work cost 
$11,478.50 and included in this amount was $1,974.36 which 
was added to the Highway Machinery Account. The Town's 
share of the cost of this work was $2,869.62. 

Sidewalks were constructed on the following streets: — 
Poor Street at Magnolia Avenue; Carlisle Street; Ferndale 
Avenue, north side; Princeton Avenue, one side; Morton 
Street from Chestnut Street to Veterans' Housing ; Andover 
Street, north side easterly from High Street ; Ridge Street ; 
Summer Street, south side from Elm Street to Whittier 
Street ; south side by 145 Haverhill Street ; Lowell Street op- 
posite the Pumping Station ; School Street, south side from 
C. Kimball's to Central Street; and Kenilworth Street at 
Poor Street. 

This work was done under Artilce 11, 1950 and Article 17, 
1951 at a cost of $5,733.13 and using 431 tons of hot top 
material. 

Under Article 18 a section of Shawsheen Road between 
Cuba Street and Stevens Street was widened to a thirty foot 

160 



width. This work consisted of regrading the road surface re- 
setting of curbing on both sides, reconstructing a sidewalk 
on the east side, relocating a catch basin, installing 40 feet of 
30" concrete culvert pipe, rebuilding a rubble retaining wall 
and lowering the grade at the entrance to Cuba Street at a 
cost of $3,318.13. 

In preparation for further reconstruction of a section of 
Greenwood Road between Lowell Street and High Plain 
Road the lines at the curves have been straightened out, with 
some cut and fill, loam removed and the necessary land ac- 
quired. Also 36 feet of 30" concrete pipe was purchased to 
be installed in the way of a brook. Expenditure to date is 
$1,374.69. 

The road leading into Pomps Pond Bathing Area was re- 
graded and the surface treated with two applications of tar 
at a cost of $500.00. 

To provide for adequate Highway Maintenance for 1952, 
we recommend an appropriation of $56,550.00. 

Trucks, Garage and Repair Shop Maintenance 

At this time it may be well to give a list of our major 
pieces of equipment as the following : 

1 Business Coupe 
7 Dump Trucks 

2 Utility Trucks 

1 Mounted Compressor 
1 Power Grader 
1 D-6 Caterpillar Tractor 
1 Snow and Sand Loader 

1 Belt Conveyor Loader 

2 Tractor Sidewalk Plows 

1 Ford Material Loader and Plow 

In addition to these, there are many other pieces of equip- 
ment such as a cement mixer, asphalt kettle, lead kettle, 3 
suction pumps, 6 sand spreaders and 12 various types of 
plows for the above equipment. It is necessary to keep all 
of these pieces of machinery in good running order to meet 
any emergency that might arise. 

161 



To provide for adequate maintenance for this department 
for 1952, we recommend an appropriation of $13,011.00. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

Under Supplementary Article 1, 1950 the work of instal- 
ling pumping equipment in the Haggetts Pond Station was 
started in 1950 and completed in 1951. The main unit in- 
stalled is a 2500 G. P. M. electric motor driven pump at a 
total cost of $13,532.69. 

Installation of increased pumping facilities at the Ban- 
croft Road High Service Station was completed in 1951 and 
is now in full operation. The new pump delivers 600 gallons 
per minute and is automatic. At present when the level of 
the reservoir on Prospect Hill is 3" from the top, the pump 
stops and starts up again when the reservoir level has 
dropped 6 inches. The total cost of these facilities is 
$8,683.83. 

A balance of $6,934.43 from 1950 together with an appro- 
priation of $12,000.00 in 1951 was used for the purpose of 
extending the distribution system. As formerly, all work 
proceeded with the joint approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
the Finance Committee and the Board of Public Works. 

Water main installations for 1951 were as follows: 






Location 


Size 


Length 


Sunset Rock Road 


6" 


477.2 Ft. 


Beacon Street 


6" 


659.0 Ft. 


Hidden Road 


6" 


998.1 Ft. 


Carmel Road 


6" 


158.0 Ft, 


Woods Road 


6" 


499.0 Ft, 


Lincoln Circle 


6" 


240.0 Ft. 


Dale Street 


6" 


258.0 Ft. 



Total 3289.3 Ft. 

Five thousand feet of six inch cement lined iron pipe was 
purchased under this article. Expenditures amounted to $16, 
914.34, leaving a balance of $2,020.09. 

162 



Other installations by private interests were : 



Location 


Size 


Length 


Off Vvoodland Road 


6" 


1103.7 Ft. 


Lockway 


6" 


500.5 Ft. 


Off Central Street 


6" 


452.0 Ft. 


Off Highland Road 


6" 


744.0 Ft. 


Total 


2800.2 Ft. 



During 1951, 524,204,000 gallons of water were pumped 
by steam turbine and electricity at the Haggetts Pond Pump- 
ing Station for a daily average of 1,436,175 gallons. 

Pumped by Electricity .... 250,624,000 Gallons 

Pumped by Steam Turbine .... 273,580,000 Gallons 



Total Pumped .... 524,204,000 Gallons 

Both units were in operation concurrently a great portion 
of the time. 

To provide for adequate expenditure in the Water Depart- 
ment during 1952, we recommend an appropriation of $51, 
950.00. 

Services in use January 1, 1952 — 3311 

Meters in use January 1, 1952 — 3272 

RECEIPTS 

Water Rates .... $63,239.86 

Water Services and Miscellaneous .... 448.30 



Paid to Town Treasurer .... $63,688.16 



163 



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Main 
Pipe 


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Meters 
in use 


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service 

pipes 

in use 


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Annual Pumpage 

Haggetts Station 

(Million Gals.) 


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Million 
Gals. 


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Direct 

Cost of 

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Net Cost 

of Maint. 

incl. pumping 


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Rates 


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164 



SEWER DEPARTMENT 

There were thirty-six house connections made in 1951. An 
extension of the sewer main on Lincoln Circle was made by 
George Cairns. No sewer main installations by the Depart- 
ment were made in 1951. 

To provide for adequate Sewer Maintenance for 1952, we 
recommend an appropriation of $6,600.00. 

SEWER MAINS 
COST OF CONSTRUCTION 

Sewer Mains — 109,759 Ft. 

Cost to Abuttors $221,058.00 

Cost to Town 407,252.00 



Total $628,310.00 Jan. 1, 1952 



PARK DEPARTMENT 

The construction of a new school on Bartlet Street pre- 
cluded the use of the Central Playground area for recre- 
ational purposes. Consequently, the Board gave permission 
to the Recreational Committee to use temporarily the Park 
Area at Whittier Street. A section of the brook at the edge 
of the playing area was fenced off and a drinking fountain 
installed on the Chestnut Street side. 

To provide for adequate Park Maintenance for 1952, we 
recommend an appropriation of $6,450.00. This sum includes 
$500.00 for a fence along a section of the brook in the park. 



ADMINISTRATIVE, SUPERVISION AND OFFICE 

EXPENSE 

To provide for adequate expense for this department for 
1952, we recommend an appropriation of $18,615.00. 



165 



STREET LIGHTING 



Date 








Annual 


Installed 


Location 


Installed Removed 


Cost 


1/15/51 


Wildwood Road 


1_1000 L. 




$ 18.00 


1/15/51 


River Road 


14—1000 L. 




252.00 


2/16/51 


Woburn Street 


4— 1000 L. 




72.00 


2/16/51 


Ballardvale Road 


1_1000 L. 




18.00 


3/19/51 


Dale Street 


1—1000 L. 




18.00 


3/14/51 


Andover Street 


1—2500 L. 1- 


-1000 L 


. 10.00 


4/ 4/51 


Cornell Avenue 


1—1000 -L. 




18.00 


4/ 4/51 


Wildwood Road 


1__1000L. 




18.00 


7/ 2/51 


Shawsheen Road 


1__1000 L. 




18.00 


7/ 3/51 


Princeton Avenue 


2—1000 L. 




36.00 


7/ 5/51 


Stevens Street 


2—1000 L. 




36.00 


7/11/51 


Spring Grove Rd. 


1_1000 L. 




18.00 


8/ 8/51 


Morton Street 


2—1000 L. 




36.00 


8/27/51 


Chandler Road 


8—1000 L. 




144.00 


10/22/51 


Bellevue Cor. 










Osgood St. 


1_1000 L. 




36.00 




with Photo Elec. Control 






10/25/51 


Chestnut Street 


1- 


-1000 L.cr. 18.00 


12/ 8/51 


Salem Street 2- 


-15,000 MV 2-2500 L. no charge 


12/10/51 


Salem Street 1- 


-15,000 MV 1- 


-1000 L. 


to town 



Total Annual Cost for 1951 Street Lighting Changes 730.00 
Changes Requested During 1951 
and Pending Installation 



Date 




Requested 




10/ 1/51 Morton Street 1—1000 L. 


18.00 


12/12/51 Ballardvale Road 1—1000 L. 


18.00 


12/12/51 Shawsheen Road 1— 1000 L. 


18.00 


12/12/51 Brown Street 2—1000 L. 


36.00 


12/27/51 Essex Street 1— 2500 L. 1- 


-1000 L. 10.00 



Annual Cost for Lights Pending Installation $100.00 

166 



1952 STREET LIGHTING COSTS 

Annual cost for lights installed as of 1/1/51 $23,332.00 

Annual cost for lights installed during 1951 730.00 

Annual cost for lights pending installation 100.00 



TOTAL REQUIRED FOR THE ABOVE LIGHTING 
INSTALLATIONS FOR 1952 $24,162.20 

To provide for adequate Street Lighting for 1952, we re- 
commend an appropriation of $24,500.00. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edward R. Lawson, Superintendent 



167 



Engineer's Report 



To the Board of Public Works : 

Gentlemen : 

The fifth annual report of the Engineering Department is 
hereby respectfully submitted for your consideration. This 
report covers the calendar year of 1951. 

In addition to performing all engineering work for the 
Board of Public Works, engineering services and advice 
have been supplied to the various other departments of the 
Town as requested. 

A plan of all land surrounding the Playstead was prepared 
for the use of the Selectmen in making their studies of land 
acquisition in that area, and later a plan of the Ella Basso 
property was prepared for recording with the deed when 
that land was purchased. 

At the request of the Selectmen plans were made to show 
the extension of Carmel Road and the subdivision of a part 
of the Infirmary Lot. 

Plans and estimates were made of two schemes for devel- 
oping the Shaw Estate on Main Street for municipal off- 
street parking. 

A plan of the intersection of Shawsheen Road, Lowell 
Street, and Beacon Street was prepared for the Selectmen 
for their use in conducting a traffic count at that location. 

Parking meter locations were laid out on Punchard Ave- 
nue, and after the installation of meters by the Highway 
Department, spaces of proper size were laid out for the 
Police Department. 

The School Building Committee requested assistance in 
laying out and digging test pits at the West Center School 
for its sewage disposal field design studies. Water, sewer 
and drainage services were furnished for the new Central 
Elementary School and water and drainage services were 
furnished for the West Center School. In conjunction with 
the drainage at the latter school, the Highway Department 

168 



constructed one catch basin and 250 linear feet of 15" R.C.P. 
side drain in Beacon Street. 

The demands of the Department of Civil Defense have not 
been as great upon this department as was anticipated a year 
ago. Maps and drafting assistance have been furnished to 
the Director of Civil Defense upon his request. 

Engineers, surveyors, contractors, and property owners 
callign upon this office for information and assistance 
have been aided as much as possible. The more common re- 
quests concern street line location and water main or sewer 
main data. 

New plans coming into this office have been kept up to 
date, and new water services and mains have been entered in 
the records. Because of the press of other work, it has not 
been possible to extend the plan file system, nor has it been 
possible to revise the water service street index. It is most 
desirable that the back paper work in this office be 
straightened out ; but the pressure of current work precludes 
accomplishing very much in this direction at present. 

A chart has been prepared which shows graphically the 
current water rates in fifteen town similar to Andover. This 
chart has been submitted to the Board for its consideration 
in regard to the advisability of revising the present water 
rates. 

A list of minimum standards of construction for private 
ways that are planned for acceptance is before the Board for 
its consideration. Your engineer urges your sanction of such 
a set of standards as they will prove most helpful to real 
estate developers, to contractors, and to this office which has 
to pass on new construction. 

HIGHWAYS 

Prior to Town Meeting, landtaking plans were prepared 
for highway work on Shawsheen Road and on Greenwood 
Road, and estimates and warrant articles prepared for this 
work. 

At Shawsheen Road the traveled way was widened from 
Cuba Street to a point near Beech Circle. A clear width 

169 



between curbs of 30 feet was obtained by acquiring 2900 
square feet of land from Wilfred Boucher on the west side, 
and by setting back the curbstones in various locations on 
both sides. A new catch basin was constructed at the brook 
crossing and the culvert extended upstream to provide for 
filling on the former Boucher land. At the Cuba Street in- 
tersection the grade was lowered to remove an awkward 
cross slope and thus improve the riding quality of Shaw- 
sheen Road. This job eliminated a narrow and dangerous 
section in Shawsheen Road. 

On Greenwood Road at the Lowell Street end, the Town 
has acquired 9540 sq. ft. of land from George H. and Mary 
D. Winslow; 16,690 sq. ft. of land from Fred Kress, and 61, 
230 sq. ft. from Frederick A. Higgins. These three parcels 
of land extend along Greenwood Road for a distance of 2450 
feet and make it possible to realign the roadway so that 
three sharp curves may be eliminated. During December 
most of the excavation and rough grading was completed on 
this section of roadway. 

Record Plans and deeds for the four above-named parcels 
were filed at the Registry of Deeds. 

On Chandler Road near Doyle's Lumber Yard the hump 
in the roadway over the old railroad tracks was cut down. 
Stone work from the old bridge abutments was removed and 
the roadway repaved to a smooth grade line. 

At the Pomps Pond recreation area the access road was 
regraded and given a surface treatment and the parking 
area was lowered and regraded to make room for more 
parking spaces. 

Under Chapter 90 Construction the highway department 
forces reconstructed 600 feet of Lowell Street from Cutler 
Road westerly. The roadway was raised four and one half 
feet at Argilla Road thus improving the sight distance thru 
this sag and eliminating a blind corner at Argilla Road. 

For the 1952 Chapter 90 program an estimate was pre- 
pared covering the widening and improvement of about 1850 
feet of River Road from Jacobson's easterly. This estimate 
was presented at the annual hearing held at Salem, and the 
petition is now under consideration by the state Commis- 

170 



sioners. 

A study and estimate has been prepared for the regrading 
of a part of Canterbury Street near houses of Charles 
Dufton. 

A survey and estimate has been prepared for the straight- 
ening and widening of River Street from Lowell Junction 
Road southerly into Wilmington. Most of this road is in 
Wilmington and any real improvement here will have to be 
worked out as a joint venture with the Town of Wilmington. 

Under the sidewalk construction program lines and grades 
were furnished for new walks on Poor Street, Magnolia Ave- 
nue from Williams Street to Shawsheen School, Princeton 
Avenue the full length, and on Morton Street from Chestnut 
Street to Memorial Circle. 

Plans and specifications were prepared for the Rogers 
Brook piping job under Article 22, and bids were received 
on August 28th. Because of the small size of this job and the 
complexities involved, only one bidder submitted a proposal. 
The Board rejected this bid as it was $3,262.00 over the 
amount of money available, and it was decided to hold this 
job over until 1952. 

Several culverts and drains were constructed during the 
year. A new 30 inch diameter R.C.P. culvert was installed on 
Argilla Road above Henderson's to replace an old stone cul- 
vert. A 16 inch cast iron culvert was constructed on Sunset 
Rock Road east of Nutmeg Lane to replace an old stone 
culvert. 

A catch basin and drain were constructed at the land of 
one Davis on Virginia Road to relieve a poor drainage con- 
dition at a low spot on this street. The necessary legal docu- 
ments were drawn and recorded so that the Town could con- 
struct the drain thru Davis' land and discharge water on 
land of Stevens. 

This office was requested to inspect the condition of West- 
wind Road, Beech Circle, and Lincoln Circle, and to report 
on their preparedness for acceptance as public ways. Recom- 
mendations were made for all these private ways, and Lin- 
coln Circle was corrected so that it was accepted as a public 
way at a Special Town Meeting in July. 

171 



BRIDGES 

All the bridges under the jurisdiction of the Board were 
inspected at least once during the past year and found to be 
safe for their posted load limits. The open deck bridges on 
Stevens Street and Central Street were flushed down at the 
end of sanding season to remove sand and salt from horizon- 
tal surfaces. 

The Central Street Bridge was scheduled for repainting 
this year ; but department forces were not able to perform 
this work before Winter set in. It is recommended that this 
bridge be painted during early 1952 and that the Stevens 
Street Bridge be painted during 1952 as scheduled. 

WATER SYSTEM 

Record drawings and sketches showing the location and 
extent of water mains constructed and house services in- 
stalled during the year were made for the permanent files. 

During the year 3289.3 linear feet of water main were ad- 
ded to the system by town construction and by acceptance of 
private ways. Private owner construction is not included in 
this total. All mains constructed this year were of 6" C.L.C.I. 
pipe. This work is more fully described in the Superinten- 
dent's Report. 

Water mains were installed in seven private ways during 
the year. As far as possible these installations were inspected 
by this office to determine if materials and workmanship met 
the requirements of the Board. These mains totalled about 
4600 lin. ft. 

This year saw the completion of the two contracts for in- 
stalling new pumping equipment at both pumping stations. 
These contracts were let in 1950 ; but no materials were de- 
livered until early in 1951. 

The new pump and motor for Haggetts Pond Station were 
delivered on February 23, 1951 and after piping and wiring 
installations were made the pump was operated for the first 
time on May 11, 1951. Tests were run on the unit on June 11, 
1951, and after a review of the test data and inspection of 
the unit the Board voted its acceptance of the entire work on 

172 



August 3, 1951. This new unit is most satisfactory in its 
operation and assures the ability to meet any heavy Summer 
demand for years to come. 

At the time that the new pump was being wired up a new 
2300 volt power service was run to the building and the older 
electric pump was reconnected to this service inside the 
building. The 110 volt lighting service was discontinued and 
110 volt electricity is now obtained by means of a dry type 
transformer inside the building. This change results in a 
small electric saving to the Town and it is in conformance 
with the policy of the Lawrence Gas and Electric Company 
to have only one service meter for this building. 

At Bancroft Road Station a surface water drain was in- 
stalled by department forces for the purpose of conducting 
waste water within the station to the drain in Bancroft 
Road. Prior to this installation the floor of this station was 
often flooded with surface water rising thru openings in the 
floor. The new drain also serves to carry away sealing water 
from the pumps. 

Work on the pump contract started on March 21, 1951 
when the new pump, motor and engine were delivered. How- 
ever, intallation work progressed slowly due to the fact that 
high ground water conditions hindered the under-floor 
piping construction. On June 11th the pump was operated 
electrically for the first time. An efficiciency test was run on 
August 28, 1951, and after inspecting the unit and reviewing 
the test data the Board voted its acceptance of th entire 
work on October 10, 1951. 

A very decided improvement was noted at this station 
upon the completion of the new interior discharge piping. 
Prior to the installation of the Venturi insert nozzle under 
this contract it had only been possible to estimate the output 
of the old pump, and this figure had been accepted as 325 
gals, per min. The reduction in friction due to the newer, 
cleaner, and larger piping allowed the discharge of the old 
pump to be raised to 400 gals, per min. In the case of the new 
pump the discharge rate was designed for 500 gals, per min. 
and it actually developed to be 600 gals, per min. during the 
daylight hours when there is a demand on the system. This 

173 



increase was also due in part to the newly lined main to 
Prospect Hill which has been in service since Aug. 1950. 

Bancroft Road Station is greatly improved as a result of 
this year's work. The station now has a larger pump with a 
standby gasoline engine which can be used in power failures. 
The Venturi nozzle meters all water pumped at the station 
thereby giving valuable information on the demands of the 
High Service System. A new telemeter installed at this sta- 
tion on October 25th controls the starting and stopping of 
the new electric pump automatically. This device has worked 
very satisfactorily and enables the High Service Reservoir 
to be kept practically full at all times during the night as well 
as the day. 

When the new pump was wired, a new 220 volt service was 
run to this station and a dry type transformer installed to 
furnish 110 volt power for lighting etc. This change resulted 
in a small saving for electricity and allowed the 110 volt 
meter to be removed, leaving but one meter at this station as 
was desired by the Lawrence Gas and Electric Company. 

During July the exterior brickwork at both stations was 
thoroughly gone over and all cracks and joints requiring 
pointing or patching were repaired. This work was done un- 
der contract with Frank McCarthy of Andover. 

Under Article 23 work was started on surveys of the land 
around Haggetts Pond with a view toward determining 
what land might be desirable to acquire for further protec- 
tion of the water supply. To date most of the land presently 
owned by the Town Jias been denned on the ground; but 
there still remain two parcels of swampy land which have 
not been surveyed. Most all of the land around the outlet of 
Haggetts Pond is low and swampy and because of the wet- 
ness of the past year and the high water in the pond it has 
been impractical to carry these surveys to completion. Much 
of the title searching, assembling of old plans, and recon- 
naissance work has been completed on this project, and al- 
though no specific recommendations as to desirable acquisi- 
tions can be made at this time it should be noted that much 
valuable data has been obtained. For the first time in the 
history of the department all town land holdings on the pond 

174 



have been listed, the deed references noted, and the respec- 
tive areas tabulated. 

A valuation survey has been made of the entire Water De- 
partment during the past year and reproduction values de- 
termined for all buildings, equipment, and for the distribu- 
tion system. These figures are of use to the assessors in their 
statement of value of Town properties and will be of greater 
assistance to the Board for use in water rate studies. 

During the Summer a study of pumping schedules and 
power rates for Haggetts Pond Station was made cooperati- 
vely with officials of the Lawrence Gas and Electric Co. A 
report with recommendations was submitted to the Board 
and is currently before the Board for its consideration. 

On August 5th a small private amphibian airplane car- 
rying four passengers capsized in Haggetts Pond near Musk- 
rat Rock while making an emergency landing. The owners 
commenced salvage operations the next day and managed to 
beach it near Babicki's where it was disassembled and re- 
moved. The entire airplane, together with all salvage equip- 
ment, was completely removed from the watershed by 
August 15, 1951. No appreciable condition of contamination 
was caused by this accident. 

The year 1951 was a particularly favorable year from the 
standpoint of water supply. Thruout the entire year the rain- 
fall was in excess of normal. The total precipitation was 47. 
35 inches as determined by the Essex Company in Lawrence 
and this amount is about 6.5 inches greater than normal. 
This wet year following on the heels of two very dry years 
enabled the pond to recover rapidly and to build up its max- 
imum storage. 

On the first day of the year the pond was at elevation 112. 
57 (full pond is considered to be at elevation 117.65) and by 
April the pond was full enough to be spilling water into Fish 
Brook. It was stated by long-time residents in the area that 
this was the first time that the pond has been overflowing in 
a great many years. At this time the pond was at elevation 
116.77 and the spillage was due to gaps in the retaining dike 
near the outlet. The pond did not begin to recede again until 
June 1st and reached its Summer low point on October 5th 

175 



when it stood at elevation 115.00. On the last day of this 
year the elevation of the water surface was 116.92 which is 
probably the highest level recorded in a great many years. 

This difference between 112.57 and 116.92 represents a 
net gain in storage of about 300 million gallons for the year. 
The average daily demand for the year 1951 has been on the 
order of 1.435 M. G. The above mentioned net gain repre- 
sents an average gain of 0.822 M.G.D. The sum of these is 
2.257 M.G.D. which represents probably the maximum yield 
that can be expected from the present Haggetts Pond water- 
shed under the best of conditions. 

The total recorded pumpage at Bancroft Road Station 
from June 23rd to December 31st was 54.951 M. G., which is 
an average of 291,000 gals, per day repumped for the High 
Service system. In former years, before metering equipment 
was available at this station, it had been determined that the 
demand of the High Service system represented about 17% 
of the total pumpage at Haggetts Pond. On the basis of the 
above data it is determined to be 20% for the last half of 
1951. This increase reflects the residential growth in this 
area over recent years. 

In June while the new Venturi nozzle was being installed 
at Bancroft Station this office ordered that the Venturi 
meter at Haggetts Pond be checked and serviced. It was 
found to be in good condition and only needed sediment re- 
moved from the transmitter tubes. It is recommended that 
both meters be regularly inspected by the manufacturers' 
service man each year in June. 

SEWERAGE SYSTEM 

No new sewer construction was performed by the Town 
this year. 

A 6 inch sewer was constructed privately by W. Shirley 
Barnard to serve lots subdivided in the former Ripley estate. 
This sewer connects to the Town sewer in Central Street. 

A 6 inch sewer extension 139 feet long was constructed in 
Lincoln Circle by private contract. This sewer became part 



176 



of the town system when this section of Lincoln Circle was 
accepted as a public way in July. 

A survey and estimate was made for a sewer extension in 
Shawsheen Road to Lincoln Street and in Lincoln Street to 
the height of land. This sewer, 1150 feet long was planned 
for submission at the July Town Meeting; but its sponsors 
did not enter the article. 

A survey and estimate was made for the possible reloca- 
tion of a section of the Fletcher Street-Kenilworth Street 
sewer thru land of Andrews. As this relocation did not prove 
practicable no work was done on it. 

From time to time questions and complaints have arisen 
regarding recent sewer assessments. Reexaminations, 
studies, and responses have been furnished to all complain- 
ants as were necessary. 

Locations, lines and grades have been furnished for sewer 
service construction and repair from time to time as re- 
quired. 

Warren 0. Petersen, Registered Professional Engineer 
Engineer for the Board of Public Works 

January 11, 1952 



177 



1952 Town Warrant 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, SS 

To Either of the Constables of the Town of Andover, 

Greeting : 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required 
to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are 
qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs to meet and 
assemble at the designated polling places in Precincts One, 
Two, Three, Four, Five and Six, viz: The Central Fire 
Station in Precinct One; the Square and Compass Hall in 
Precinct Two, the Sacred Heart School, Balmoral St. Shaw- 
sheen Village, in Precinct Three ; the Andover Grange Hall 
in Precinct Four ; the Fire Station, Ballardvale, in Precinct 
Five; and the Peabody House, Phillips Street, in Precinct 
Six, in said Andover, on 

MONDAY, THE THIRD DAY OF MARCH, 1952 
at 7 : 00 o'clock A. M. to act upon the following articles : 

Article 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, a Collector 
of Taxes for three years, a Selectman for three years, an As- 
sessor for three years, two members of the Board of Public 
Works for three years, a member of the Board of Health for 
three years, two members of the School Committee for three 
years, a member of the Planning Board for five years, a 
Trustee of Memorial Hall Library for seven years, a Trustee 
of Memorial Hall Library for three years to fill a vacancy, 
five Trustees of Punchard Free School for three years, three 
Constables for one year, and all town officers required by 
law to be elected by ballot. 

All the above candidates to be voted for on one ballot. The 
polls will be open from 7 :00 o'clock A.M. to 7 : 00 o'clock P.M. 

178 



After final action on the preceding Article One, the said 
meeting shall stand adjourned by virtue of Section 20, Chap- 
ter 39 of the General Laws, to Monday, March 10th at 7:00 
o'clock P. M. at the Memorial Auditorium, then and there to 
act upon the following articles, namely : 

Article 2. To elect all other officers not required by law 
to be elected by ballot. 

Article 3. To establish the salary of elected TOWN 
OFFICERS for the ensuing year. 

Article 4. To determine what sums of money shall be 
appropriated for the following purposes : 

Appropriation for the Assessors, Board of Selectmen, and 
all Departments under their control: Appropriation for 
Tree Warden : Appropriation for the Board of Health : Ap- 
propriation for Trustees of Memorial Hall Library: Ap- 
propriation for Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery: Ap- 
propriation for School Committee: Appropriation for all 
Departments under the control of the Board of Public 
Works: Appropriation for any other Town Charges and 
Expenses. 

Article 5. To see if the town will authorize the Select- 
men (or treasurer) to sell all land acquired through fore- 
closure of tax title at public or private sale. 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote that all full time 
employees of the town, other than those appointed by the 
School Committee, shall have during any calendar year ac- 
cumlated sick leave of not over thirty days without loss of 
pay, provided, however, the head of any department may 
require a doctor's certificate before any portion of such 
leave is approved. 

Article 7. To see if the town will vote to accept Section 
6B, Chapter 40, General Laws, reading as follows :- 

A city or town which accepts this section 
may appropriate money for the purchase of uniforms for 
menbers of its police and fire departments. 

179 



Article 8. To see if the town will vote to accept as a by- 
law Article IV, Section 13. 

No person except an officer of the law in the 
performance of his duties shall enter upon the premises of 
another with the intention of peeping into the windows of a 
house or spying upon in any manner any person or persons 
therein. 

Article 9. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to sell the West Center School property 
either by public auction or by private sale for such price and 
upon such terms as they may deem proper and to authorize 
the said Board of Selectmen to execute and deliver a deed of 
said property in pursuance of this vote. 

Article 10. To see if the town will vote to adopt the fol- 
lowing by-law under General Laws Chapter 39, Section 13 : 

The number of voters necessary to constitute a quorum at 
any town meeting shall be three hundred and fifty registered 
voters, provided, that a number less than a quorum may 
from time to time adjourn the same and provided also, that 
this by-law shall not apply to such parts of meetings as are 
devoted exclusively to the election of town officers. 

Article 11. To see if the town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-law by changing the zoning of a portion of a par- 
cel of land on the west side of Main Street from a single 
Residence District to a Business District. Said portion being 
the rear land of the "Shaw Estate" at 85 Main Street and is 
more particularly described as follows : 

beginning at the northeasterly corner 
thereof at land of Charles A. Jr. and Ruth C. Hill on the pre- 
sent westerly limit of the Business District, thence running 
southeasterly by said westerly limit of the Business District 
about two hundred and forty-two (242) feet to land of 
Nathaniel and Anna M. Stowers, thence turning and run- 
ning southwesterly by land of said Stowers one hundred and 
thirty-seven (137) feet to a corner at a wall, thence turning 
and running southeasterly by a stone wall and by land of 

180 



said Stowers and by land of Albert E. Hulme and by land of 
The Andover Historical Society two hundred and twenty- 
seven and one half (227%) feet to a corner at land of Evelyn 
R. Marr, thence turning and running southwesterly by land 
of said Marr and by land of Jesse and Amelia Bottomley 
eighty-six (86) feet to a corner at land of Glynn L. and Allie 
M. Coryell, thence turning and running northwesterly by 
land of said Coryell and by land of St. Mary's Church Society 
four hundred sixty-eight and one half (468%) feet to a 
corner at land of George A. and Lillian E. Noury, thence 
turning and running northeasterly by land of said Noury 
and land of said Hill two hundred four and one half (20414) 
feet to the westerly line of the present Business District and 
the point of beginning. 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to develop an off-street parking area at the "Shaw 
Property", 85 Main Street and also authorize the Selectmen 
to sell such excess loam as may be available upon the com- 
pletion of the work ; and transfer from parking meter funds 
the amount of $7,000.00 for said parking area development. 

Article 13. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $5,500.00 for the purpose of installing 
necessary heating and plumbing facilities in the town build- 
ing on Andover Street in Ballardvale, commonly known as 
the old schoolhouse. 

Artic'e 14. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $1,500.00 for the purchase of two new 
automobiles for the Police Department, and use the trade-in 
value of two (2) 1951 Ford Sedans as part of the purchase 
price. 

Article 16. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
School Committee to continue to maintain State-Aided Vo- 
cational Education in accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 74, General Laws, and Acts amendatory thereto, or 
dependent thereon, and further raise and appropriate the 
sum of fiftten hundred and fifty ($1,550.00) dollars therefor. 

181 



Article 15. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $17,000.00 for the purchase of a 1000 
gallon per minute pumping engine for the use of the Fire 
Department. 

Article 17. To see if the town will vote to purchase by 
negotiated sale, or seize by right of eminent domain, a parcel 
of land on Bancroft Road to be used for water department 
purposes ; said parcel of land being owned now or formerly 
by George J. Flathers and Melrena Flathers and containing 
about 3.49 acres; as shown on a plan on file in the Town 
Clerk's office and entitled "Plan of Land on Bancroft Road 
to be acquired for a New Distribution Reservoir, drawn by 
Warren O. Petersen, Town Engineer, dated February 8, 
1950" ; and raise and appropriate the amount of $4,000.00 
therefor. 

Article 18. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Public Works to extend the sixteen inch Low Ser- 
vice Force Main for a distance of about 4500 lineal feet from 
the present end at Phillips Street to the Bancroft Road 
Pumping Station, and appropriate therefor $55,000.00, of 
which $25,000.00 is to be raised by taxation from the 1952 
levy and $30,000.00 to be transferred from available funds 
in the treasury. 

Article 19. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the amount of $7,000.00 for the purpose of im- 
proving Beacon Street from Lowell Street northerly to and 
beyond the West Center School ; said improving work to con- 
sist of widening the traveled way, contructing necessary 
drainage facilities, and constructing a sidewalk from Lowell 
Street to the school. 

. Article 20. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate or transfer from unappropriated available funds 
in the treasury, a sum of money for Chapter 90 Highway 
Maintenance, or take any action in relation thereto. 

182 



Article 21. To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to purchase a rubber tired tractor with 
snow plow attachments for sidewalk use, and raise and ap- 
propriate the amount of $2,200.00 therefor. 

Article 22. To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to repair and build sidewalks and raise and 
appropriate the sum of $5,000.00 therefor. 

Article 23.. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $5,000.00 for the purpose of extending 
and improving the water system of the Town of Andover, 
all work to be done under the supervision of the Board of 
Public Works, and no work to be started until approved by 
the Board of Selectmen, the Finance Committee, and the 
Board of Public Works. 

Article 24. To see if the town will vote to accept by re- 
lease one or more parcels of land on Corbett Street as shown 
on a plan of Corbett Street made by Morse, Dickinson and 
Goodwin, Engineers of Haverhill, Mass., on file at the Town 
Clerk's Office. 

Article 25. To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to install a sewer main in Magnolia Avenue 
for a distance of about 575 feet from the present upper end 
of the sewer in Ferndale Avenue to the end of the accepted 
way on Magnolia Aevenue; and raise and appropriate the 
amount of twenty-five hundred ($2500.00) dollars therefor, 
on petition of Carmelo J. Calcina and others. 

Article 26. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of four thousand ($4000.00) dollars and 
authorize the Board of Public Works to extend the sewer 
main from its present dead end on Shawsheen Road a dis- 
tance of 970 feet to a point opposite the residence of Kerr 
Sparks on Lincoln Street, on petition of Francis E. Wilson 
and others. 

183 



Article 27. To see if the town will vote to acquire a right 
of way and construct a public highway therein from Corbett 
Street via Franklin Avenue, so called, and land of Romano 
and LaRoche to Topping Road, in accordance with the exist- 
ing by-laws and regulations of the town ; said right of way 
to be at least forty (40) feet wide and to follow the line of an 
existing sewer right of way as shown on plan #S 151 Acces- 
sion 279 on file in the Board of Public Works office ; and raise 
and appropriate the sum of $2100.00 for said land acquisi- 
tion by release, purchase, or seizure by right of eminent do- 
main, and for said construction work; on petition of Fran- 
cesca Romano and others. 



Article 28. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Public Works to install a water main in a proposed 
way from Corbett Street to Topping Road and following an 
existing sewer right of way through Franklin Avenue and 
private land for a distance of about 750 feet ; and raise and 
appropriate $3000.00 therefor, on petition of Francesca Ro- 
mano and others. 

Article 29. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $1600.00 plus the turn in value of an 
old tractor and mower, for the purchase of a new tractor 
with mower attachment for use in the Tree Department. 

Article 30. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $850.00 for the purchase of an electric 
chain saw with generator and attachments for use in the 
Tree Department and for the removal of diseased elm trees 
under Dutch Elm disease control work. 

Article 31. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of five hundred and twenty-five ($525.00) 
dollars for the purpose of purchasing a chapel tent for the 
Spring Grove Cemetery. 



184 



Article 32. To see if the town will vote to accept the pro- 
visions of Chapter 781 acts of 1951 increasing the retirement 
allowance of certain former town employees retired prior to 
November 1, 1949. 

Article 33. To see if the town will vote to accept or a- 
dopt the following proposed amendment to the zoning By- 
Laws : that any structure for living accommodations which 
shall be erected, placed or maintained in any district of the 
town shall have a first floor area of at least 400 square feet. 

Article 34. To see if the town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-Law by striking out section 4 of Section XII and 
substituting therefor the following : 

"4. Permit conversion of a one-family or a two or 
more family house existing at the time this By-Law is a- 
dopted into a two-family or apartment house." 

Article 35. To see if the town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-Law by striking out Section 2 of Section X and 
substituting therefor the following : 

"2. Removal of Earth, etc. The removal for sale of 
sand, gravel, or quarried stone shall not be permitted in any 
District of the Town except by permit from the Board of 
Appeals. No loam to be removed for sale for more than one- 
half of its depth in any part of the Town, except when inci- 
dental to, and in connection with the construction of a build- 
ing, for which a permit has been issued or except for other 
purposes as may be permitted by the Board of Appeals." 

Article 36. To see if the town will vote to amend the 
zoning By-Law by changing the zoning of a section of land 
at 9 and 13 Chestnut Street from a residential district to a 
business district bounded and described as follows : 

At 13 Chestnut Street: Northerly by Chestnut 
Street, one hundred nine and one-half (IO9V2) f e ^t, Easterly 
by lands now or formerly of Higgins and Andrews, two hun- 
dred two (202) feet. 

Southerly by land formerly of David Shaw, one hundred 

185 



twenty-nine and one-half (129%) feet, and westerly by land 
now or formerly of Glazier, two hundred twenty (220) feet, 
be all of said measurements more or less. 

At 9 Chestnut Street : Beginning at the Northeast- 
erly corner of the premises hereby conveyed at a stone bound 
at land now or formerly of one Cole and thence running 
Southerly by said Cole's land two hundred and twenty and 
eight-tenths (220.8) feet to a stone bound at land now or 
formerly of one Shaw; thence running Southwesterly by 
said Shaw's land seventy-six and eight-tenths (76.8) feet to 
land now or formerly of one Tyler ; thence running North- 
erly by said Tyler's land and now or formerly of one Kendall 
two hundred and thirty-five (235) feet to a stone bound at 
Chestnut Street; thence Easterly by said Chestnut Street 
eight-eight (88) feet to the point of beginning. 

Article 37. To see if the town will vote to rezone to a 
business area the following described property on Lowell 
Street : 

Beginning at the southeasterly corner on the south- 
erly side of Lowell Street at a point three hundred and 
ninety-four and 75/100 feet distant from a culvert at the 
northeasterly corner of the southerly side of said Lowell 
Street; thence running southerly forty-four and 42/100 feet 
to a stake, thence turning slightly and running southeasterly 
sixty and 48/100 feet to an iron bar ; thence turning and run- 
ning easterly one hundred seventy-two and 50/100 feet more 
or less to a point ; thence turning and running northerly one 
hundred feet more or less to said Lowell Street ; thence turn- 
ing and running westerly one hundred eighty-seven and 50/ 
100 feet more or less to a point of beginning, on petition of 
George Hird and others. 

.Article 38. To see if the town will vote to amend the zo- 
ning By-Law by changing the zoning of a tract of land at the 
corner of Lowell and Poor Streets, in Shawsheen Village, 
from a residential district to a business district, bounded and 
described as follows : 

186 



First Tract : Beginning at the Southwesterly cor- 
ner thereof at a point marked by a stake on the Northerly 
side of Lowell Street; thence running Easterly by said 
Lowell Street eighty-four and 92/100 feet to an Essex Coun- 
ty bound ; thence turning and running North thirty degrees 
and 55', East thirty one and 75/100 feet to a stone bound; 
thence turning and running North 19°39' West one hundred 
sixteen and 10/100 feet by Poor Street to an iron pipe; 
thence turning and running slightly South of West by the 
second Tract hereinafter described fifty-five and 45/100 feet 
to an iron pipe ; thence turning and running Southwesterly 
by land of the Town of Andover thirty-six feet to an iron 
post ; thence turning and running Southerly by land of Bred- 
bury 98 and 82/100 feet to the point of beginning; contain- 
ing 11,695 square feet more or less; being shown as Lot No. 
1-B on plan of Land in Andover, Mass. owned by Esther 
Bredbury, dated Oct. 1950 F. W. Stowers, Surveyors. 

Second Tract : Beginning at the Southeasterly cor- 
ner thereof and at the Northeasterly corner of the First 
Tract above described which point is marked by an iron pipe 
on the Westerly side of Poor Street ; thence running North- 
westerly by Poor Street seventy-seven feet to a point ; thence 
turning and running Southwesterly thirty-three and five 
tenths feet, thence Southeasterly nine and 3/10 feet; thence 
Southwesterly again fifty-one and 3/10 feet ; thence Westerly 
eleven and 4/10 feet; thence Southwesterly again about 
"seven feet to an iron pipe, the last five courses being by land 
of the Town of Andover ; thence turning and running slight- 
ly North of East by the first tract above described fifty-five 
and 45/100 feet to the point of beginning containing 1,566 
square feet more or less and being shown as Lot 1-A on the 
plan referred to above, on petition of Frederick E. Cheever 
and others. 



Article 39. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $400.00 to provide a display of fire- 
works in observance of Independence Day, July 4, 1952, on 
petition of Andover Post No. 8, American Legion. 

107 



Article 40. To see if the town will vote to amend the zo- 
ning By-Law by changing the zoning of a parcel of land lo- 
cated between 291 and 295 North Main Street, and desig- 
nated on the Assessors Plan as Lots 3 and 4, from a single 
residence district to a business district, and further de- 
scribed as follows : 

Southwesterly by North Main Street, one hundred 
twenty-four (124) feet ; Northwesterly by lot numbered two 
(2) on said plan, one hundred sixty-five (165) feet, more or 
less; Northeasterly by the Shawsheen River, and South- 
easterly by lot numbered five (5) on said plan, one hundred 
eighty-one (181) feet, more or less, on petition of Harold 
F. Gens and others. 

Article 41. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Public Works to regrade and reconstruct a portion 
of Canterbury Street beginning at a point about 900 feet 
northwesterly from Lowell Street and extending about 700 
feet in a northwesterly direction ; and raise and appropriate 
the sum of $2,000.00 therefor, on petition of Alden R. Taylor 
and others. 

Article 42. To see if the town will vote to accept as a 
public way and name Memorial Circle, as approved by the 
Board of Survey and laid out by the Board of Selectmen, as 
shown on a plan entitled Subdivision & Acceptance Plan, 
Memorial Circle made April 1949 by Clinton F. Goodwin, 
Engineer, Haverhill, Mass. Both plan and description refer- 
red to being on file at the Town Clerk's office, on petition of 
the Andover Housing Authority. 

Article 43. To see if the town will vote to accept $3,657. 
00, received in 1951, for the perpetual care of lots in Spring 
Grove Cemetery, and $750.00 for flower funds, on petition of 
Thaxter Eaton, Treasurer. 

Article 44. To determine what disposition shall be made 
of unexpended appropriations and free cash in the treasury. 



188 



Article 45. To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 

Article 46. To transact any other business that may 
legally come before the meeting : 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting at- 
tested copies and publication thereof, seven days at least 
before the time and place of said meeting as directed by the 
By-Laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not, and make return of this warrant with 
your doings thereon, at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this Fourth day of February, A. D. 
1952. 

Roy E. Hardy 

J. Everett Collins 

Sidney P. White 



Selectmen of Andover 



189 



TOWN OF 

ANDOVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 




ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

TOWN OFFICERS 



For the Fiscal Year Ending 
DECEMBER 31, 1952 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Accounting Taxes and Assessments 80 

Aid to Dependent Children 63 

Animal Inspector 53 

Appropriations for 1952 - 40 

Armistice Day 76 

Assessors 48, 111 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 82 

Municipal Properties and Public 

Improvements 112 

Balance Sheet 95 

Board of Appeals 122 

Board of Health 56, 143 

Board of Public Welfare 61, 113 

Aid to Dependent Children 63 

Infirmary 65, 136 

Old Age Assistance 63 

Veterans' Services 65, 116 

Board of Public Works 170 

Accounts Receivable 86 

Administrative and Office 73 

Assessments and Receipts 83 

Highways 58 

Sewers 5 7 

Sidewalks 59 

Snow Removal and Sanding 6 1 

Superintendent & Town 

Engineer's Report 171 

Tree Dept.-B.P.W. Consolidation 

152 

Trucks, Garage and Repair Shop 58 

Water Maint. and Construction 76 

Water & Sewerage, Special 132 

Bonds, Redemption of See Town Debt 

Building Inspector 53, 145 

Cemetery Funds 88 

Civilian Defense 71, 156 

Damages to Persons and Property 71 
Departmental Accounts Receivable 86 
Director of Accounts 35 

Dog Officer 53 

Dutch Elm Disease 55 

Election and Registration 48 

Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital 57 
Expenditures for 1952 46 



General Government 

Election and Registration 
Municipal Buildings 
Town Officers 

Highways 
Housing Authority 

Insurance 
Interest 

Jury List 

Maturing Debt 
Memorial Day 
Memorial Hall Library 70, 93. 

Library Statistics 

Report of Librarian 

Trustees 



PAGE 

48 

50 

4 

58 
118 



54. 



Milk Inspector 
Moderator 
Moth Suppression 
Motor Vehicles Excise Tax 
Municpial Buildings 
Municipal Properties and Public 
Improvements 

Old Age Assistance 
Overlay 

Parking Meters 

Parks and Playgrounds 

Planning Board 

Police Department 

Public Dump 

Punchard Athletic Association 



71 
79 

158 

79 
76 
162 
169 
163 
162 

144 
49 

150 
82 
50 

112 

63 
85 

47, 50 
74 

0, 125 

1, 139 
57 
69 



Finance Committee 
Fire Department 
Forest Fires 



49 

52, 138 

53 



Receipts for 1952 40 

Recreation Committee 74, 129 

Reserve Fund 80 

Retirement Report 105 

*School Department 66 

School Lunch 69 

Sealer, Weights and Measures 54, 147 

Selectmen 46 

Sewers 57 

Assessments 83 

Snow Removal and Sanding 61 
*Also see School Report 



PAGE 



PAGE 



Spring Grove Cemetery 79, 115 

Street Lighting 61 

Tax Collector 47, 108 

Summary of Tax Collector's Cash 
Account 110 

Tax Title Account 82 

Town Accountant 39, 46 

Accounting Taxes and Assessments 

80 

Appropriation for 1952 40 

Balance Sheet 95 

Board of Public Works Accounts 

Receivable 86 

Departmental Accounts Receivable 

86 
Director of Accounts 35 

Expenditures for 1952 46 

Maturing Debt 79 

Overlay 85 

Receipts for 1952 40 

Reserve Fund 80 

Surplus Revenue 87 

Town Debt 104 

*Trustees of Punchard Free School 

90 



Town Clerk 
Town Counsel 
Town Debt 
Town Infirmary 
Town Meetings 

Proceedings 

Warrants 

Town Officers 
Town Reports 
Town Scales 
Treasurer 
Tree Warden 
Tree Dept. and B.P.W. Consolidation 
Special Committee 152 

Trust Funds 89 

*Trustees of Punchard Free School 90 



34 


-, 48 




49 




104 


65, 


136 




14 


9, 


184 




4 




73 




73 


47, 


107 


55, 


148 



Veterans' Quarters 
Veterans' Services 
Vital Statistics 



75 
65, 116 

34 



Water & Sewerage, Special 132 

Water Accounts Receivable 86 

Water Maint. and Construction 76 

Wire Inspector 53, 146 



Water Accounts Receivable 



86 



•Also see School Report 



Town Officers 

ELECTED AND APPOINTED 



Moderator 
Arthur Sweeney 

Board of Selectmen and Public Welfare 
Roy E. Hardy, Chairman Term expires 1954 

J. Everett Collins, Secretary Term expires 1953 

Sidney P. White Term expires 1955 

George H. Winslow, Clerk 
Arthur W. Cole, Agent, Bureau, Old Age Assistance, 

Welfare Board 
Francis P. Markey, Veterans' Services Agent 

Board of Assessors 

Roy E. Hardy, Chairman Term expires 1954 

J. Everett Collins Term expires 1953 

Sidney P. White Term expires 1955 

Town Clerk 
George H. Winslow Term, Tenure 

Collector of Taxes 
James P. Christie Term expires 1955 

Treasurer 
Thaxter Eaton Term expires 1953 

Town Accountant Town Counsel 

George C. Napier Walter C. Tomlinson 

Board of Retirement 
George C. Napier, Chairman Term expires 1955 

Edmond E. Hammond Term expires 1955 

David L. Nicoll, Secretary Term expires 1953 



Board of Public Works 



Sidney P. White, Chairman 

P. Leroy Wilson 

Victor J. Mill, Jr. 

Ernest N. Hall 

Alexander H. Henderson, Secretary 

Warren 0. Petersen, Town Engineer 

Edward R. Lawson, Superintendent 



Term expires 1953 

Term expires 1954 

Term expires 1954 

Term expires 1955 

Term expires 1955 



School Committee 
Dorothy T. Partridge 
Anna M. Greeley 
C. Carleton Kimball 
William A. Doherty, Secretary 
Gordon C. Colquhoun, Chairman 
Kenneth L. Sherman, Superintendent 



Term expires 1953 

Term expires 1953 

Term expires 1955 

Term expires 1955 

Term expires 1954 



School Building Committee 
C. Carleton Kimball, Chairman 
Kenneth L. Sherman, Secretary 

Herbert P. Carter Harold T. Houston Roy E. Hardy 



Gordon L. Colquhoun 
Attendance Officer 

John Campbell 
Athletic Medical Director 
John J. McArdle, Jr., M. D. 



Stanley F. Swanton 
School Physician 
Philip W. Blake, M. D. 

School Nurse 
Ruth E. Westcott, R. N. 



Director, Continuation School 
Carl M. Gahan 



Board of Health 



Philip W. Blake, M. D. 

Charles 0. McCullom, Secretary 

William V. Emmons, Chairman 



Term Expires 1955 
Term expires 1954 
Term expires 1953 



Lotta M. Johnson, R. N. Nurse and Agent 
Robert A. Walsh, Milk Inspector 



Inspector of Slaughtering 
Ray S. Youmans 



Inspector of Building 
Ralph W. Coleman 



Inspector of Plumbing 
Alexander Thomson 



Planning Board and Board of Survey 
Leon A. Field, Secretary Term expires 1953 

Walter Tomlinson, Chairman Term expires 1954 



Frederick E. Cheever 
Kirk R. Batcheller 
Richard C. Simmers 
Inspector of Wires 
William J. Young 



Term expires 1955 

Term expires 1956 

Term expires 1957 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Joseph Serio 

Wilson Crawford, Deputy 



Inspector of Animals 
Hartwell B. Abbot 



Trustees of Memorial Hall Library 



Joseph Serio 


Term expires 


1955 


Arthur W. Reynolds, Chairman 


Term expires 


1957 


William N. Perry, Secretary 


Term expires 


1954 


Ernest D. Walen 


Term expires 


1958 


Leo F. Daley, Treasurer 


Term expires 


1959 


Alan R. Blackmer 


Term expires 


1953 


Caroline P. Leavitt 


Term expires 


1956 



Trustees of Punchard Free School 
Rev. Frederick B. Noss, President 
Rev. John S. Moses 
Rev. John G. Gaskill 

Edmond E. Hammond, Clerk and Treas. Term expires 1955 
Fred W. Doyle Term expires 1955 

Roy E. Hardy Term expires 1955 

Harry Sellars Term expires 1955 

C. Carleton Kimball Term expires 1955 

Trustees of Cornell Fund 

Edward P. Hall Term expires 1953 

Arthur W. Cole Term expires 1954 

Frederick E. Cheever, Treasurer Term expires 1955 



Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery 

Frank R. Petty, Chairman Term expires 1954 

Malcolm E. Lundgren Term expires 1953 

Albert E. Curtis Term expires 1954 

William D. Mclntyre Term expires 1955 

Frederick E. Cheever Term expires 1955 

Board of Registrars 
Ralph A. Bailey, Chairman Term expires 1954 

Walter F. McDonald Term expires 1953 

Eugene A. Zalla Term expires 1955 

George H. Winslow, Clerk 

Finance Committee 
Charles W. Arnold * George E. Abbot 

Ernest L. Wilkinson Wiliam S. Titcomb, Secretary 

Fred W. Doyle Louis E. Gleason, Chairman 

Leo F. Daley Norman L. Miller 

Recreation Committee 
Stafford A. Lindsay, Chairman Alan F. Dunlop 

George A. Stanley, Jr. Francis P. Markey 

Alco E. Taylor 

Superintendent of Moth Department 
George R. Abbott Appointed Annually 

Tree Warden 
George R. Abbott Term expires 1953 

Board of Appeals 
James S. Eastham, Chairman Term expires 1955 

Roy E. Hardy, Secretary Term expires 1953 

Edward P. Hall Term expires 1954 

Walter C. Tomlinson, Associate Member 
Leon A. Field, Associate Member 

Andover Housing Authority 
Garrett J. Burke, State Member — Assistant Treasurer 

Term expires 1956 
* Deceased 

7 



Winthrop P. Newcomb, Chairman Term expires 1953 

Franklyn K. Haggerty, Vice Chairman Term expires 1954 

Charles Hatch, Secretary Term expires 1955 

Thomas R. Wallace, Treasurer Term expires 1953 

Fire Department 

Charles E. Buchan, Chief 

Charles E. Buchan, Forest Warden 

Police Department 

* George A. Dane, Chief 

* George A. Dane, Dog Officer 

Constables 
*George A. Dane Term expires 1953 

George N. Sparks Term expires 1953 

George B. Brown Term expires 1953 

Roy A. Russell 

TOWN OF ANDOVER 

Population 1950 Census — 12437 
Registered Voters 1952 — 8495 

POLITICAL SUBDIVISIONS INCLUDING ANDOVER 

Senators 
John F. Kennedy, Boston Leverett Saltonstall, Dover 

Fifth Congressional District 
Edith Nourse Rogers, 444 Andover St., Lowell 
Fifth Councillor District 
Arthur A. Thomson, 49 Greene St., North Andover 

Fourth Essex Senatorial District 
John Adams, 15 Stratford Rd., Andover 

Fifth Essex Representative District 
J. Everett Collins, 35 Summer St., Andover 

Frank S. Giles, 373 Lowell St., Methuen 

William Longworth, 27 Stevens St., Methuen 
Essex County Commissioners 
Arthur A. Thompson, Methuen 

C. F. Nelson Pratt, Saugus 

J. Fred Manning, Lynn 
^Deceased 

8 



Annual Town Meeting 



MARCH 3 1952 



Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, Febru- 
ary 4th, 1952, the Inhabitants of the Town of Andover, 
qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs, met and as- 
sembled at the designated polling places in Precincts One, 
Two, Three, Four, Five and six, viz: The Central Fire 
Station in Precinct One; the Square and Compass Hall in 
Precinct Two, the Sacred Heart School, Balmoral Street, 
Shawsheen Village, in Precinct Three ; the Andover Grange 
Hall in Precinct Four; the Fire Station, Ballardvale, in 
Precinct Five, and the Peabody House, Phillips Street, in 
Precinct Six, in said Andover on : 

Monday, The Third Day of March, 1952 
at 7 : 00 o'clock A. M. to act upon the following articles : 

Essex, ss. Andover, March 3, 1952 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one 
of the Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the 
inhabitants of said town, to meet at the time and places and 
for the purposes state in said warrant, by posting a true and 
attested copy of the same, on the Town House, on each 
Schoolhouse and in no less than five other public places 
where bills and notices are usually posted and by publication 
in the Andover Townsman. 
Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

George N. Sparks, Constable 

Article 1. Election of Officers 

Took up Article 1 and proceeded to vote for Town Officers. 
The Ballot boxes were found to be empty and registered 
0000. 

The Polls were opened at seven o'clock A. M. and closed at 
seven o'clock P. M. The total number of ballots cast was 
3596— viz: Precinct 1—928, Precinct 2—663, Precinct 
3—619, Precinct 4—456, Precinct 5—384, Precinct 6—546. 



Moderator — for one year 
Precincts 
12 3 4 5 6 

771 507 520 377 299 489 Arthur Sweeney 2963 

10 James S. Eastham 1 

157 156 99 78 85 57 Blanks 632 

Tax Collector — For Three Years 

819 553 533 395 337 498 James P. Christie 3135 

109 110 86 61 47 48 Blanks 461 

Selectman — For Three Years 

314 272 209 109 136 135 Albert Cole, Jr. 1175 

590 365 394 338 240 402 Sidney P. White 2329 

24 26 16 9 8 9 Blanks 92 

Assessor — For Three Years 

316 279 214 119 137 143 Albert Cole, Jr. 1208 

584 347 389 327 238 393 Sidney P. White 2278 

28 37 16 10 9 10 Blanks 110 

Board of Public Works — Two For Three Years 

434 427 283 140 94 146 Joseph W. Connor 1524 

414 220 216 220 313 291 Ernest N. Hall 1674 

541 278 354 318 207 379 Alexander Henderson 2077 

42 54 68 25 7 32 James V. Irvine 228 

192 118 132 100 29 124 John M. MacKenzie 695 

233 229 195 109 118 120 Blanks 994 

School Committee — Two For Three Years 

448 458 344 243 195 212 W T illiam A. Doherty 1900 

445 246 299 236 89 371 C. Carleton Kimball 1686 

265 179 271 160 288 150 Robert C. Vogt 1313 

465 225 194 163 71 291 George B. Westhaver 1409 

233 218 130 110 125 68 Blanks 884 

Board of Health — One For Three Years 

796 554 530 387 330 493 Philip W. Blake 3090 

132 109 89 69 54 53 Blanks 506 

10 







Planning Board — One For Five Years 








Precincts % 




1 


2 


3 4 5 6 




515 


398 


411 288 222 296 Richard C. Simmers 


2130 


330 


185 


168 135 110 203 Vincent F. Stulgis 


1131 


83 


80 


40 33 52 47 Blanks 


335 


Trustee of Memorial Hall Library — For Seven Years 


817 


579 


537 387 314 494 Leo F. Daley 


3128 


111 


84 


82 69 70 52 Blanks 
Trustee of Memorial Hall Library 
One For Three Years To Fill A Vacancy 


468 


711 


480 


488 362 314 449 Joseph Serio 


2804 








10 Peter Kupis 


1 


217 


183 


131 94 69 97 Blanks 
Trustees of Punchard Free School 
Five For Three Years 


791 


744 


512 


497 399 295 472 Fred W. Doyle 


2919 


695 


445 


462 332 271 461 Edmond E. Hammond 


2666 


745 


471 


475 362 287 471 Roy E. Hardy 


2811 


710 


450 


465 340 274 466 C. Carleton Kimball 


2705 


710 


461 


455 337 274 448 Harry Sellars 


2685 


1036 976 


741 510 519 412 Blanks 


4194 






Constables — Three For One Year 




744 


471 


479 362 287 474 George B. Brown 


2817 


788 


528 


499 390 313 493 George A. Dane 


3011 


749 


496 


483 366 323 477 George N. Sparks 


2894 


.503 


494 


396 250 229 194 Blanks 


2066 



All the foregoing officers were voted for on one ballot and 
the check lists were used. 

REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT 1 

Andover March 3, 1952 
Polls opened at 7 A. M. Warden in charge, Rowland W. 
Luce. Ballot box registered when polls opened 0000. Polls 
closed at 7 P. M. Ballot box registered when polls closed 928. 
Number of ballots received 1794. Number of ballots returned 
866. Number of ballots cast 928. Police officer on duty Wil- 
liam Tammany. Voted to count ballots at 8:30 A. M. 

Joseph W. McNally, Clerk 
n 



REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT 2 

Andover, March 3, 1952 

Polls opened at 7 A. M. Warden in charge, Mark Keane. 
Ballot box registered when polls opener 0000. Polls closed 
at 7 P. M. Ballot box registered when polls closed 663. Num- 
ber of ballots received 1499. Number of Ballots returned 
836. Number of ballots cast 663. Police officer on duty David 
Nicoll. Voted to count ballots at 8 :30 A. M. 

Norman K. MacLeish, Clerk 

REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT 3 

Andover, March 3, 1952 
Polls opened at 7 A. M. Warden in charge, Norman War- 
hurst. Ballot box registered when polls opened 0000. Polls 
closed at 7 P. M. Ballot box registered when polls closed 
619. Number of ballots received 1540. Number of ballots 
returned 921. Number of ballots cast 619. Police officer 
on duty, Richard Caldwell. Voted to count ballots at 7:30 
A.M. 

Clarence H. Colmer, Clerk 

REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT 4 

Andover, March 3, 1952 
Polls opened at 7 A. M. Warden in charge, Charles B. M. 
Whiteside. Ballot box registered when polls opened 0000. 
Polls closed at 7 P. M. Ballot box registered when polls 
closed 456. Number of ballots received 863. Number of bal- 
lots returned 407. Number of ballots cast 456. Police officer 
on duty Frank Koza. Voted to count ballots at 7 : 10 A. M. 

Frederick J. Kearn, Clerk 

REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT 5 

Andover, March 3, 1952 
Polls opened at 7 A. M. Warden in charge, William Miller, 
Jr. Ballot box registered when polls opened 0000. Polls 
closed at 7 : 00 P. M. Ballot box registered when polls closed 
384. Number of ballots received 713. Number of ballots re- 
turned, 329. Number of ballots cast 384. Police officer on 
duty George N. Sparks. Voted to count ballots at 10:40 
A.M. 

Eugene A. Zalla, Clerk 

12 



REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT 6 

Andover, March 3, 1952 

Polls opened at 7 A. M. Warden in charge Ralph A. 
Bailey. Ballot box registered when polls opened 0000. Polls 
closed at 7:00 P.M. Ballot box registered when polls 
closed 546. Number of ballots received 1310. Number of 
ballots returned 764. Number of ballots cast 546. Police 
officer on duty Roy Russell. Voted to count ballots at 8:00 
A.M. 

John M. Lynch, Clerk 

After final action of Article One, the said meeting was ad- 
journed by virtue of Section 20, Chapter 39 of the General 
Laws to Monday, March 10th at 7 o'clock P. M. at the Me- 
morial Auditorium. 



IS 



Adjourned Town Meeting 

MARCH 10, 1952 



The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 878 
persons admitted to the meeting. The meeting was called to 
order 7 :00 P. M. by Arthur Sweeney, Moderator. 

Unanimous consent was asked to admit nine persons. 

Opening prayer was offered by Rev. Paul E. Callahan. 

Salute to the flag was led by Roy E. Hardy. 

The warrant and return of service by the constable was 
read by the Town Clerk. 

Article 1. — To elect a Moderator for one year, a Collector 
of Taxes for three years, a Selectman for three years, an 
Assessor for three years, two members of the Board of 
Public Works for three years, a member of the Board of 
Health for three years, two members of the School Commit- 
tee for three years, a member of the Planning Board for five 
years, a Trustee of Memorial Hall Library for seven years, 
a Trustee of Memorial Hall Library for three years to fill a 
vacancy, five Trustees of Punchard Free School for three 
years, three Constables for one year, and all town officers 
required by law to be elected by ballot. 

All the above candidates to be voted for on one ballot. 
The polls will be open from 7 :00 o'clock A. M. to 7 : 00 o'clock 
P.M. 

The Town Clerk announced the results of ballot March 
3rd declared Arthur Sweeney elected as Moderator for the 
ensuing year, and he had previously been sworn to faithfully 
perform the duties of that office. 

The moderator then declared the other successful candi- 
dates elected. 

Sidney P. White, Selectman for Three Years. 

Sidney P. White, Assessor for Three Years. 

James P. Christie, Collector of Taxes for Three years. 

Ernest N. Hall, Board of Public Works for Three years. 

Alexander H. Henderson, Board of Public Works for 
Three years. 

14 



William A. Doherty, School Committee for Three years. 
' C. Carleton Kimball, School Committee for Three years. 

Philip W. Blake, Board of Health for Three years. 

Richard C. Simmers, Planning Board for Five years. 

Leo F. Daley, Trustee of Memorial Hall Library for Seven 
years. 

Joseph Serio, Trustee of Memorial Hall Library for Three 
years, (to fill a vacancy) . 

Fred W. Doyle, Trustee of Punchard Free School for 
Three years. 

Edmond E. Hammond, Trustee of Punchard Free School 
for Three years. 

Roy E. Hardy, Trustee of Punchard Free School for Three 
years. 

C. Carleton Kimball, Trustee of Punchard Free School for 
Three years. 

Harry Sellars, Trustee of Punchard Free School for Three 
years. 

George B. Brown, Constable for One year. 

George A. Dane, Constable for One year. 

George N. Sparks, Constable for One year. 

Article 2. — To elect all other officers not required to be 
elected by ballot. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED Frederick E. 
Cheever be elected Trustee of Cornell Fund for three years. 

' Article 3. — To establish the salary of elected Town 
Officers for the ensuing year. 

It was VOTED that the salaries of the elected Town Of- 
ficers for the ensuing year be established at: (each item be- 
ing voted on separately) : 
Chairman, Board of Selectmen per annum $ 800.00 

Two members at $600. each per annum 1200.00 

Board of Assessors 

Three members at $400. each per annum 1200.00 

Board of Public Welfare 

Three members at $100 each per annum 300.00 

Town Clerk 3800.00 

15 



Collector of Taxes 

Town Treasurer 

Moth superintendent and Tree Warden 

combined salary for both per week 

beginning April 1st. 
Board of Health 



3800.00 
3700.00 



per week 67.00 



Three members at $100. each per annum 


300.00 


Chairman, Board of Public Works 


300.00 


Secretary, Board of Public Works 


100.00 


Treasurer, Library Trustees 


100.00 


Moderator, per meeting, beginning March 10 


10.00 


Article 4. — Departmental appropriations : 




American Legion 


$ 600.00 


Veterans of Foreign Wars 


600.00 


Disabled Veterans 


480.00 


Armistice Day 


150.00 


Memorial Day 


1350.00 


Aid to Dependent Children 


17500.00 


Veterans Services 


17500.00 


Old Age Assistance 


87000.00 


Public Welfare 


13700.00 


Disability Assistance 


5300.00 


Retirement Fund 


21751.26 


Damages to Persons and Property 


500.00 


Elections and Registrations 


7462.00 


Insurance 


22000.00 


Essex T.B. Hospital 18762.39 




Recreation 


10000.00 


Public Dump 


2000.00 


Printing Town Report 


1320.00 


Selectmen 


3585.00 


Treasurer 


4870.00 


Parking Meter Account 230.00 




Collector of Taxes 


8238.00 


Accountant 


5298.20 


Assessors 


10650.00 


Town Clerk . 


5795.00 


Moderator 


30.00 


Town Counsel 

16 


750.00 



Finance Committee 


20.00 


Civil Defense 


6000.00 


Planning Board and Survey 


200.00 


Dog Officer 


225.00 


Animal Inspector 


350.00 


Building Inspector 


2355.00 


Town Scales 


200.00 


Inspector of Wires 


1175.00 


Sealer of Weights and Measures 


760.00 


Municipal Buildings 


7374.00 


Infirmary 


12640.00 


Moth Suppression 


8655.00 


Dutch Elm Disease 


8000.00 


Police Department 


70650.00 


Parking Meter Account 3900.00 




Fire Department 


86983.00 


Brush Fires 


1800.00 


Interest 


12861.25 


Retirement of Bonds 


79000.00 


Tree Warden 


9675.00 


Board of Health 


7040.00 


Care of T.B. Patients 


3000.00 


Trustees of Memorial Library 




(plus dog tax receipts) 


32164.55 


Spring Grove Cemetery 


17379.00 


School Committee 


426356.00 


Highway Maintenance 


56550.00 


Water Maintenance 


51950.00 


Parks 


6450.00 


Sewer Maintenance 


6600.00 


Snow Removal and Sanding (to include private 




ways and 2000.00 for equipment when 




necessary) 


25000.00 


Trucks, Garage and Repair Shop 


13011.00 


Street Lighting 


24500.00 


Administrative and Office 


18615.00 


Total to be raised by taxation 


$1,245968.26 


Total not to be raised by taxation 22892.39 




Grand total appropriated 


$1,268860.65 



Special Articles 

Article 12 — Shaw Parking Approp. 

(Parking Meter Receipts) 7000.00 

Article 13 — Plumbing & Heating Facilities 

Old School House B.V. 
Article 14 — Two new automobiles Police Dept. 

(Plus turn in on two 1951 Ford Sedans) 
Article 15 — Pumping Engine, Fire Department 
Article 16 — State-Aided Vocational Education 
Article 17 — Reservoir Land-Bancroft Rd. 
Article 18 — 16" Low Service Force Main 

(Plus amount from available funds) 30000.00 
Article 19 — Improvement Beacon Street 
Article 20 — Chapter 90 — Highway Maintenance 
Article 21 — B.P.W. Tractor with attachments 
Article 22 — Repair and build sidewalks 
Article 23 — Extending & improving Water System 
Article 25 — Sewer Main, Magnolia Avenue 
Article 29 — Mowing machine & attachments, 

Tree Departments 

(Plus turn in of old tractor & mower) 
Article 30 — Chain Saw, Tree Department 
Article 41 — Grading Canterbury St. 



5500.00 



1500.00 

17000.00 

1550.00 

4000.00 

25000.00 

7000.00 
2000.00 
2200.00 
5000.00 
5000.00 
2500.00 

171.50 

850.00 
1500.00 



Total Special Articles raised by taxation 80771.50 

Total Special Articles not raised 

by taxation 37000.00 

Grand total Special Articles 117771.50 

Grand total Budget and Special Articles $1,386632.15 

Article 5. — To see if the town will authorize the Select- 
men (or treasurer) to sell all land acquired through fore- 
closure of tax title at public or private sale. . 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to authorize 
the Selectmen to sell all land acquired through foreclosure of 
tax title at public or private sale. 



Article 6. — To see if the town will vote that all full time 
employees of the town, other than those appointed by the 

18 



School Committee, shall have during any calendar year ac- 
cumulated sick leave or not over thirty days without loss of 
pay, provided, however, the head of any department may re- 
quire a doctor's certificate before any portion of such leave 
is approved. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED that all full 
time employees of the town, other than those appointed by 
the School Committee, shall be credited with sick leave with 
pay not to exceed 15 working days for each year of service. 
Sick leave not used in any year may be accumulated but not 
to exceed 30 days in the aggregate. For absence for a period 
of more than five days at any one time, the appointing au- 
thority shall require evidence in the form of a psysician's 
certificate for the necessity of such absence. 

The adjourned meeting, March 10th the vote was made 
which was clarified under reconsideration at the Adjourned 
Meeting, March 17th with the above resulting vote. 

Article 7. — To see if the town will vote to accept Section 
6B, Chapter 40, General Laws, reading as follows :- 

A city or town which accepts this section may appropriate 
money for the purchase of uniforms for members of its 
police and fire departments. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Sec- 
tion 6B, Chapter 40, General Laws, reading as follows :- 

A city or town which accepts this section may appropriate 
money for the purchase of uniforms for members of its 
police and fire departments. 

Article 8. — To see if the town will vote to accept as a by- 
law Article IV, Section 13. 

No person except an officer of the law in the performance 
of his duties shall enter upon the premises of another with 
the intention of peeping into the windows of a house or spy- 
ing upon in any manner any person or persons therein. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept 
Article 8 as read. 

Article 9. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to sell the West Center School property 

19 



either by public auction or by private sale for such price 
and upon such terms as they may deem proper and to au- 
thorize the said Board of Selectmen to execute and deliver 
a deed of said property in pursuance of this vote. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to sell the West Center School prop- 
erty after abandonment by the School Committee, either by 
public auction or by private sale for such price and upon 
such terms as they may deem proper and to authorize the 
said Board of Selectmen to execute and deliver a deed of 
said property in pursuance of this vote. 

Article 10. — To see if the town will vote to adopt the fol- 
lowing by-law under General Laws Chapter 39, Section 13. 
The number of voters necessary to constitute a quorum at 
any town meeting shall be three hundred and fifty regist- 
ered voters, provided, that a number less than a quorum 
may from time to time adjourn the same and provided also, 
that this by-law shall not apply to such parts of meetings 
as are devoted exclusively to the election of town officers. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept 
Article 10 as read. 

Article 11. — To see if the town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-law by changing the zoning of a portion of a 
parcel of land on the west side of Main Street from a single 
Residence District to a Business District. Said portion be- 
ing the rear land of the "Shaw Estate" at 85 Main Street 
and is more particularly described as follows : 

Beginning at the northeasterly corner thereof at land of 
Charles A. Jr. and Ruth C. Hill on the present westerly 
limit of the Business District, thence running southeasterly 
by said westerly limit of the Business District about two 
hundred and forty-two (242) feet to land of Nathaniel and 
Anna M. Stowers, thence turning and running southwesterly 
by land of said Stowers one hundred and thirty-seven (137) 
feet to a corner at a wall, thence turning and running south- 
easterly by a stone wall and by land of said Stowers and by 
land of Albert E. Hulme and by land of The Andover His- 
torical Society two hundred and twenty-seven and one half 

20 



( 2271/2 ) f ee t to a corner at land of Evelyn R. Marr, thence 
turning and running southwesterly by land of said Marr and 
by land of Jesse and Amelia Bottomley eighty-six (86) feet 
to a corner at land of Glynn L. and Allie M. Coryell, thence 
turning and running northwesterly by land of said Coryell 
and by land of St. Mary's Church Society four hundred six- 
tyeight and one half (468/ 2 ) feet to a corner at land of 
George A. and Lillian E. Noury, thence turning and running 
north-easterly by land of said Noury and land of said Hill 
two hundred four and one half (204 5/2) feet to the westerly 
line of the present Business District and the point of begin- 
ning. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to amend the 
Zoning By-Law by changing the zoning of a portion of a 
parcel of land on the west side of Main Street from a single 
Residence District to a Business District, described as fol- 
lows: 

BEGINNING AT the northeasterly corner thereof at 
land of Charles A. Jr. and Ruth C. Hill on the present west- 
erly limit of the Business District, thence running south- 
easterly by said westerly limit of the Business District about 
two hundred and forty two (242) feet to land of Nathaniel 
and Anna M. Stowers, thence turning and running south- 
westerly by land of said Stowers and by land of Town of 
Andover one hundred and fifty-five (155) feet, thence turn- 
ing and running northwesterly by land of said Town of 
Andover about two hundred and thirty-eight (238) feet to 
land of George A. and Lillian E. Noury, thence turning and 
running northeasterly by land of said Noury and land of 
said Hill one hundred and fifty-five (155) feet to the wester- 
ly line of the present Business District and the point of be- 
ginning. Yes 335, No 152. 

Article 12. — To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to develop an off-street parking area at the "Shaw 
Property" 85 Main Street and also authorize the Selectmen 
to sell such excess loam as may be available upon the com- 
pletion of the work ; and transfer from parking meter funds 
the amount of $7000.00 for said parking area development. 

21 



Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept 
Article 12 as read. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to take up 
Articles 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38 and 40, those Articles which 
pertained to Zoning after consideration of Article 12. They 
may be found in the property order and numbering in the 
warrant. 

Article 13. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $5,500.00 for the purpose of installing 
necessary heating and plumbing facilities in the town build- 
ing on Andover Street in Ballardvale, commonly known as 
the old school house. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept Arti- 
cle 13, as read. 

Article 14. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $1500.00 for the purchase of two new 
automobiles for the Police Department, and use the trade- 
in value of two (2) 1951 Ford Sedans as part of the pur- 
chase price. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept 
Article 14 as read. 

Article 15. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $17,000.00 for the purchase of a 1000 
gallon per minute pumping engine for use of the Fire De- 
partment. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept 
Article 15 as read. 

Article 16. — To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
School Committee to continue to maintain State-Aided Vo- 
cational Education in accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 74, General Laws, and Acts amendatory thereto, or 
dependent thereon, and further raise and appropriate the 
sum of $1550.00 therefor. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1550.00 to continue to maintain 
state-aided vocational education in accordance with the 
provisions of Chapter 74, General Laws, and Acts amenda- 
tory thereto, or dependent thereon. 



Article 17. — To see if the town will vote to purchase by 
negotiated sale or seize by right of eminent domain, a par- 
cel of land on Brancroft Road to be used for water depart- 
ment purposes, said parcel of land being owned now or 
formerly by George J. Flathers and Melrena Flathers and 
containing about 3.49 acres, as shown on a plan on file in 
the Town Clerk's office and entitled "Plan of Land on Ban- 
croft Road to be acquired for a New Distribution Reservoir, 
drawn by Warren 0. Petersen, Town Engineer, dated Feb- 
ruary 8, 1950", and raise and appropriate the amount of 
$4000.00 therefor. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept 
Article 17 as read. 

After Article 17 after motion duly seconded it was 
VOTED to adjourn at 11:50 P.M. to Monday, March 17, 
1952 at 7 :00 P.M. 

The second adjourned meeting was called to order by the 
moderator on Monday, March 17, 1952 at 7:00 P.M. Un- 
animous consent was asked to admit three persons. 337 
persons were present, who were checked on the voting list. 

Article 18 being the first article not reached at the pre- 
vious adjourned meeting proceeded to take up Article 18. 

Article 18. — To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Public Works to extend the sixteen inch Low Ser- 
vice Force Main for a distance of about 4500 lineal feet from 
the present end at Phillips Street to the Bancroft Road 
Pumping Station, and appropriate therefor $55,000.00 of 
which $25,000.00 is to be raised by taxation from the 1952 
levy and $30,000 to be transferred from available funds in 
the treasury. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept 
Article 18 as read. 

Article 19. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the amount of $7,000.00 for the purpose of im- 
proving Beacon Street from Lowell Street northerly to and 
beyond the West Center School said improving work to con- 
sist of widening the traveled way, constructing neccessary 

23 



drainage facilities, and constructing a sidewalk from Lowell 
Street to the school. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept 
Article 19 as read. 

Article 20. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate or transfer from unappropriated available funds 
in the treasury, a sum of money for Chapter 90 Highway 
Maintenance, or take any action in relation thereto. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to raise and 
appropriate $2000.00 for Chapter 90 Highway Maintenance. 

Article 21. — To see if the town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to purchase a rubber tired tractor with snow 
plow attachments for sidewalk use, and raise and appropri- 
ate the amount of $2200.00 therefor. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept 
Article 21 as read. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to take up 
Article 29 with Article 21, action on which is reported in 
the proper order in the warrant. 

Article 22. — To see if the town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to repair and build sidewalks and raise and 
appropriate the sum of $5000.00 therefore. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept 
Article 22 as read. 

Article 23. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $5000.00 for the purpose of extending 
and improving the water system of the Town of Andover, 
all work to be done under the supervision of the Board of 
Public Works, and no work to be started until approved by 
the Board of Selectmen, the Finance Committee, and the 
Board of Public Works. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept 
Article 23 as read. 

24 



Article 24. — To see if the town will vote to accept by re- 
lease one or more parcels of land on Corbett Street as shown 
on a plan of Corbett Street made by Morse, Dickinson and 
Goodwin, Engineers of Haverhill, Mass. on file at the Town 
Clerk's Office. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept 
Article 24 as read. 

Article 25. — To see if the town will authorize the Board of 
Public Works to install a sewer main in Magnolia Avenue 
for a distance of about 575 feet from the present upper end 
of the sewer in Ferndale Avenue to the end of the accepted 
way on Magnolia Avenue; and raise and appropriate the 
amount of $2500.00 dollars therefor, on petition of Carmelo 
J. Calcina and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept 
Article 25 as read. 

Article 26. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $4000.00 dollars and authorize the 
Board of Public Works to extend the sewer main from its 
present dead end on Shawsheen Road a distance of 970 feet 
to a point opposite the residence of Kerr Sparks on Lincoln 
Street, on petition of Francis E. Wilson and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept 
Article 26 as read, but under Article 46 it was VOTED to re- 
consider Article 26 and also VOTED to refer it to the Board 
of Public Works for further study. 

Article 27 — To see if the town will vote to acquire a right 
of way and construct a public highway therein from Cor- 
bett Street via Franklin Avenue, so called, and land of Ro- 
mano and LaRoche to Topping Road, in accordance with the 
existing by-laws and regulations of the town ; said right of 
way to be at least forty (40) feet wide and to follow the line 
of an existing sewer right of way as shown on plan #S 151 
Accession 279 on file in the Board of Public Works office; 
and raise and appropriate the sum of $2100.00 for said land 
acquisition by release, purchase or seizure by right of emi- 

25 



nent domain, and for said construction work ; on petition of 
Francesca Romano and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to pass over 
Article 27. 

Article 28. — To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Public Works to install a water main in a proposed 
way from Corbett Street to Topping Road and following an 
existing sewer right of way through Franklin Avenue and 
private land for a distance of about 750 feet ; and raise and 
appropriate $3000.00 therefor, on petition of Francesca 
Romano and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 
28 be stricken from the warrant. 

Article 29. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $1600.00 plus the turn in value of an 
old tractor and mower, for the purchase of a new tractor 
with mower attachment for use in the Tree Department. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $171.50 plus the turn-in value of an 
old tractor and mover for the purchase of a new heavy-duty 
mowing machine and necessary attachments to be assembled 
on the tractor purchased under Article 21. Said unit to be 
used in the summer by the Tree Department. 

Article 30. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $850.00 for the purchase of an electric 
chain saw with generator and attachments for use in the 
Tree Department and for the removal of diseased elm trees 
under Dutch Elm disease control work. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to 
raise and appropriate $850.00 under Article 30. 

Article 31. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of five hundred and twenty five ($525.00) 
dollars for the purpose of purchasing a chapel tent for the 
Spring Grove Cemetery. 

Article withdrawn. 

26 



Article 32. — To see if the town will vote to accept the pro- 
visions of Chapter 781 of the acts of 1951 increasing the re- 
tirement allowance of certain former town employees retired 
prior to November 1, 1949. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept 
Article 32 as read. 

Article 33. — To see if the town will vote to accept or adopt 
the following proposed amendment to the zoning By-Laws : 
that any structure for living accommodations which shall be 
erected, placed or maintained in any district of the town 
shall have a first floor area of at least 400 square feet. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED Unanimously 
to accept Article 33 as read. 

Article 34. — To see if the town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-Law by striking out section 4 of Section XII and 
substituting therefor the following : 

"4. Permit conversion of a one-family or a two or 
more family house existing at the time they By-Law is 
adopted into a two-family or apartment house." 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED Unanimously 
to accept Article 34 as read. 

Article 35. — To see if the town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-Laws by striking out Section 2 of Section X and 
substituting therefore the following : 

"2. Removal of Earth, etc. The removal for sale 
of sand, gravel, or quarried stone shall not be permitted in 
any District of the Town except by permit from the Board 
of Appeals. No loam to be removed for sale for more than 
one half of its depth in any part of the Town, except when 
incidental to, and in connection with the construction of a 
building, for which a permit has been issued or except for 
other purposes as may be permitted by the Board of Ap- 
peals." 

Article 35 was lost — Yes 93, No 136. 

Article 36. — To see if the town will vote to amend the zo- 
ning By-Law by changing the zoning of a section of land at 

27 



9 and 13 Chestnut Street from a residential district to a 
business district bounded and described as follows : 

At 13 Chestnut Street: Northerly by Chestnut Street, 
one hundred nine and one-half (lO^) feet, Easterly by 
lands now or formerly of Higgins and Andrews, two hun- 
dred two (202) feet. 

Southerly by land formerly of David Shaw, one hundred 
twenty-nine and one-half (129 1 /2) feet, and westerly by land 
now of formerly of Glazier, two hundred twenty (220) feet, 
be all of said measurements more or less. 

At 9 Chestnut Street : Beginning at the Northeasterly cor- 
ner of the premises hereby conveyed at a stone bound at land 
now or formerly of one Cole and thence running Southerly 
by said Cole's land two hundred and twenty and eight-tenths 
(220.8) feet to a stone bound at land now or formerly of one 
Shaw; thence running Southwesterly by said Shaw's land 
seventy-six and eight-tenths (76.8) feet to land now or for- 
merly of one Tyler; thence running Northerly by said 
Tyler's land and now or formerly of one Kendall two hun- 
dred and thirty-five (235) feet to a stone bound at Chestnut 
Street ; thence Easterly by said Chestnut Street eighty-eight 
(88) feet to the point of beginning. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to amend the 
zoning By-Law by changing the zoning of a section of land 
at 13 Chestnut Street from a residential district to a ^busi- 
ness district bounded and described as follows : 

At 13 Chestnut Street: Northerly by Chestnut Street, 
one hundered nine and one-half (IO91/2) feet, Easterly by 
lands now or formerly of Higgins and Andrews, two hun- 
dred two (202) feet. 

Southerly by land formerly of David Shaw, one hundred 
twenty-nine and one-half ( 1291/2 ) feet, and westerly by land 
now or formerly of Glazier, two hundred twenty (220) feet, 
be all of said measurements more or less. 

Voted Yes 380 No. 6 

Article 37 — To see if the town will vote to rezone to a 
business area the following described property on Lowell 
Street : 

28 



Beginning at the southeasterly corner on the southerly 
side of Lowell Street at a point three hundred and ninety- 
four and 75/100 feet distant from a culvert at the north- 
easterly corner of the southerly side of said Lowell Street; 
thence running southerly forty-four and 42/100 feet to a 
stake, thence turning slightly and running southeasterly 
sixty and 48/100 feet to an iron bar ; thence turning and run- 
ning easterly one hundred seventy-two and 50/100 feet more 
or less to a point ; thence turning and running northerly one 
hundred feet more or less to said Lowell Street ; thence turn- 
ing and running westerly one hundred eighty-seven and 50/ 
100 feet more or less to a point of beginning, on petition of 
George Hird and others. 
Article withdrawn. 

Article 38 — To see if the town will vote to amend the zon- 
ing By-Law by changing the zoning of a tract of land at the 
corner of Lowell and Poor Streets, in Shawsheen Village, 
from a residential district to a business district, bounded and 
described as follows : 

FIRST TRACT: Beginning at the Southwesterly 
corner thereof at a point marked by a stake on the Northerly 
side of Lowell Street; thence running Easterly by said 
Lowell Street eighty-four and 92-/ 100 feet to an Essex 
County bound; thence turning and running North thirty 
degrees and 55', East thirty one and 75/100 feet to a stone 
bound ; thence turning and running North 19°39' West one 
hundred sixteen and 10/100 feet by Poor Street to an iron 
pipe ; thence turning and running slightly South of West by 
the Second Tract hereinafter described fifty-five and 45/100 
feet to an iron pipe; thence turning and running South- 
westerly by land of the Town of Andover thirty-six feet to 
an iron post ; thence turning and running Southerly by land 
of Bredbury 98 and 82/100 feet to the point of beginning; 
containing 11,695 square feet more or less; being shown as 
Lot No. 1-B on plan in Andover, Mass. owned by Esther 
Bredbury dated October 1950 F. W. Stowers, Surveyors. 

29 



SECOND TRACT: Beginning at the Southeasterly corner 
thereof and at the Northeasterly corner of the First Tract 
above described which point is marked by an iron pipe on 
the Westerly side of Poor Street; thence running North- 
westerly by Poor Street seventy-seven feet to a point ; thence 
turning and running Southwesterly thirty-three and five 
tenths feet, thence Southeasterly nine and 3/10 feet; thence 
Southwesterly again fifty-one and 3/10 feet; thence West- 
erly eleven and 4/10 feet; thence Southwesterly again about 
seven feet to an iron pipe, the last five courses being by land 
of the Town of Andover ; thence turning and running slight- 
ly North of East by the first tract above described fifty-five 
and 45/100 feet to the point of beginning containing 1,566 
square feet more or less and being shown as Lot 1-A on the 
plan referred to above, on petition of Frederick E. Cheever 
and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept 
Article 38 as read. 

Yes 437 No 9. 

Article. .39. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $400.00 to provide a display of fire- 
works in observance of Independence Day, July 4, 1952, on 
petition of Andover Post No. 8, American Legion. 

Article lost. 

Article 40. — To see if the town will vote to amend the 
zoning By-Law by changing the zoning of a parcel of land 
located between 291 and 295 North Main Street, and desig- 
nated on the Assessors Plan as Lot 3 and 4, from a single 
residence district to a business district, and further de- 
scribed as follows : 

Southwesterly by North Main Street, one hundred 
twenty-four (124) feet; Northwesterly by lot numbered two 
(2) on said plan, one hundred sixty-five (165) feet, more or 
less; Northeasterly by the Shawsheen River and South- 
easterly by lot number five (5) on said plan, one hundred 
eighty-one (181) feet, more or less, on petition of Harold 
F. Gens and others. 

Article lost — Yes 196 No 135 

30 



Article. .41. — To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Public Works to regrede and reconstruct a portion 
of Canterbury Street beginning at a point about 900 feet 
northwesterly from Lowell Street and extending about 700 
feet in a northwesterly direction ; and raise and appropriate 
the sum of $2000.00 therefor, on petition of Alden R. Taylor 
and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to authorize 
the Board of Public Works to regrade and reconstruct a por- 
tion of Canterbury Street beginning at a point about 900 
feet northwesterly from Lowell Street and extending about 
700 feet in a northwesterly direction ; and raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $1500.00 therefor. 

Article 42. — To see if the the town will vote to accept as a 
public way and name Memorial Circle, as approved by the 
Board of Survey and laid out by the Board of Selectmen, as 
shown on a plan entitled Subdivion & Acceptance Plan, Me- 
morial Circle made April 1949, by Clinton F. Goodwin, En- 
ginner, Haverhill, Mass. Both plan and description refer- 
red to being on file at the Town Clerk's office, on petition of 
the Andover Housing Authority. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept 
Article 42 as read. 

Article 43. — To see if the town will vote to accept $3657. 
received in 1951, for the perpetual care of lots in Spring 
Grove Cemetery, and $750.00 for flower funds, on petition of 
Thaxter Eaton, Treasurer. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept 
Article 43 as read. 

Article 44. — To determine what disposition shall be made 
of unexpended appropriations and free cash in the treasury. 

It was voted that all unexpended appropriations be turned 
into the treasury, except the following : 

Civil Defense $ 137.36 

Article 8 (1946) — History of Andover 1800.00 

Article 22 (1944) — Shaw Property Plans 2500.00 

31 



Police Department 2100.00 

Essex County T. B. Hospital 614.15 

Article 19 (1945) — Sewer Special Com. Study 486.07 

B. P. W. Machinery Account 4571.07 

Article 17 — Sidewalks 1811.62 

Article 18 — Shawsheen Road 19.20 

Article 19 — Greenwood Road 125.31 

O. A. A. Grants 8165.80 

Article 1 (Nov. 1950) — School Bldgs. Contr. 409554.60 
Article 2 (June 1951) — Purchase of Land 

Adjacent to Central Schools 4998.00 

Article 22 — Rogers Brook 4740.30 

Article 29 — Central Playground 2300.00 
Article 1 (Supplementary Warrant 1950) 

B. P. W. Pump 1467.31 

Article 21 (1951) — Extending Water System 2020.09 
Article 23 — Protection of Haggetts Pond 

Water Shed 723.40 
That $20,000.00 of the Overlay Surplus be transferred to 
the Reserve Fund and that $65,000. free cash be voted to the 
Assessors to reduce the 1952 tax rate. 

Article 45. — To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 
Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to accept the 
report of the Town Officers and place on file. 

Article 46. — To transact any other business that may le- 
gally come before the meeting : 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to reconsider 
Article 6 final action on which is recorded under that article. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to reconsider 
Article 26 and it was further VOTED to refer Article 26 to 
the Board of Public Works for further study. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED that the mod- 
erator appoint a committee of three to study the possibility 
of consolidating the Tree Department into the Board of 
Public Works in order to achieve greater operating econ- 
omies, the committee to report its findings at the next an- 
nual Town Meeting. 

32 



Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED to adjourn at 
9:14 P.M. 

APPOINTMENTS BY THE MODERATOR 

Finance Committee 

Louis E. Gleason, Chairman 

George E. Abbot Charles W. Arnold Fred W. Doyle 

Leo F. Daley Ernest L. Wilkinson 

William S. Titcomb, Secretary 



Committee for Study of Consolidating 
Tree Dept. Into Board of Public Works 

Joseph F. Bacigalupo Edmond E. Hammond 

Ellsworth H. Lewis 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

Attest : 

George H. Winslow, Town Clerk 



33 



Report of the Town Clerk 



To the Board of Selectmen : 

I hereby submit my report for the office of the Town Clerk 
for the year 1952. 



The total number of registered voters in Andover at the 
close of registration October 3, 1952 was 8495 by precincts 



as follows: 



1 1999 

2 1568 

3 1717 

4 993 

5 750 

6 1468 



8495 



VITAL STATISTICS 



Number of births recorded 204 

Males 112 

Females 92 

Number of deaths recorded 173 

Males 93 

Females 80 

Number of marriages 123 

Respectfully submitted, 

George H. Winslow, Town Clerk 



34 



Report of Director of Accounts 



June 16, 1952 
To the Board of Selectmen : 
Mr. Roy E. Hardy, Chairman 
Andover, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen : 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the books and 
accounts of the town of Andover for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1951, made in accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 44, General Laws. This is in the form of a report 
made to me by Mr. Herman B. Dine, Assistant Director of 
Accounts. 

Very truly yours, 
Francis X. Lang 

Director of Accounts 



Mr. Francis X. Lang 

Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

State House, Boston 

Sir: 

As directed by you, I have made an audit of the books and 
accounts of the town of Andover for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1951, and submit the following report thereon: 

The financial transactions as recorded on the books of the 
several departments collecting or disbursing money for the 
town or committing bills for collection were examined, 
checked, and verified. 

The books and accounts of the town accountant were ex- 
amined. The ledger accounts were analyzed, the receipts as 
recorded were checked with the treasurer's record of re- 
ceipts, the payments were compared with the treasury war- 

35 



rants approved by the board of selectmen, and the appropri- 
ation accounts were checked with the appropriations and 
transfers voted by the town as listed from the town clerk's 
record of town meetings. The ledger record of departmental 
accounts receivable was checked with the records of the 
several departments committing the bills and with the 
treasurer's books, and a balance sheet, which is appended 
to this report, was prepared showing the financial condition 
of the town on December 31, 1951. 

The books and accounts of the town treasurer were ex- 
amined. The recorded receipts were analyzed and checked 
with the records of the departments making payments to the 
treasurer and with the other sources from which money was 
paid into the town treasury. The expenditures were com- 
pared with the treasury warrants approved by the board of 
selectmen and with the accountant's records, and the cash 
balance on February 6, 1952 was proved by reconciliation 
of the bank balances with statements furnished by the banks 
of deposit, by an acknowledgment by a bank of the treasury 
bills in its custody, and by actual count of the cash in the 
office. 

The payments on account of debt and interest were proved 
by comparison with the amounts of debt maturing and with 
the cancelled securities and coupons on file. 

The savings bank books and securities representing the 
investment of the trust and investment funds in the custody 
of the town treasurer were examined and listed, the income 
being proved and the payments to the town being verified. 

The municipal contributory retirement funds in the cus- 
tody of the town treasurer were examined. The retirement 
ledger accounts were analyzed, the receipts as recorded were 
checked with the appropriations voted by the town, with 
the deductions from the salaries and wages of the members, 
and with the interest earned on invested funds. The pay- 
ments were compared with the treasury warrants approved 
by the retirement board, and the balance of the funds on 
February 6, 1952 was proved by examination of the securi- 
ties and by reconciliation of the bank balance with a state- 
ment received from the bank. 

36 



The deductions from employees' salaries for federal taxes, 
for the purchase of savings bonds, and for Blue Cross and 
Blue Shield were listed and reconciled with the amounts due 
and paid to the Federal Government, and to the Massachu- 
setts Hospital Service, Inc. 

The records of tax titles held by the town were examined. 
The tax title register was analyzed and checked with the 
collector's and the treasurer's accounts and with the records 
at the Registry of Deeds. 

The transactions of the several trust funds in the custody 
of the treasurers of the John Cornell, Punchard Free School, 
and Memorial Hall Library funds were verified, and the se- 
curities and savings bank books representing the investment 
of these funds were examined and listed. 

The books and accounts in the tax collector's office were 
examined and checked. The taxes, excise, and assessments 
outstanding at the time of the previous audit and all subse- 
quent commitments were audited and compared with the 
assessors' warrants. The cash receipts as posted in the com- 
mitment books were compared with the cash book record of 
collections, the abatements were compared with the asses- 
sors' record of abatements granted, the payments to the 
treasurer were verified, and the outstanding accounts were 
listed and proved with the control accounts in the account- 
ant's ledger. 

The town clerk's records of sporting, dog, and town 
.licenses, as well as of permits, recording fees, etc., were ex- 
amined and checked. The payments to the Division of 
Fisheries and Game were verified by comparison with the 
receipts on file, and the payments to the town treasurer were 
compared with the treasurer's cash book. 

The surety bonds of the officials required by law to furnish 
them were examined and found to be in proper form. 

The records of departmental accounts receivable were ex- 
amined. The payments to the treasurer were verified, the 
abatements were checked, and the outstanding accounts 
were listed and reconciled with the accountant's ledger ac- 
counts. 

37 



The books and accounts of the public works department 
were examined. The records of water and sewer charges 
were examined and checked. The recorded collections were 
compared with the payments to the treasurer, the abate- 
ments as recorded were verified, and the outstanding ac- 
counts were listed and reconciled with the accountant's led- 
ger accounts. 

Verification of the outstanding tax, excise, assessment, de- 
partmental, and water accounts was made by sending notices 
to a number of persons whose names appeared on the books 
as owing money to the town, and from the replies received 
it appears that the accounts, as listed, are correct. 

The records of cash receipts of the sealer of weights and 
measures, of the inspectors of buildings, wires, and plumb- 
ing, of the health, police, town scales, school, and library de- 
partments, and of all other departments wherein money is 
collected for the town were examined and checked, the pay- 
ments to the treasurer and the cash on hand being verified. 

Appended to this report in addition to the balance sheet, 
are tables showing a reconciliation of the treasurer's cash 
summaries of the tax, excise, assessment, tax title, depart- 
mental, and water accounts, as well as tables showing the 
condition and transactions of the trust, investment, and 
municipal contributory retirement funds. 

For the cooperation extended by the several town officials 
during the audit, I wish, on behalf of my assistants and for 
myself, to express appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Herman B. Dine, 

Assistant Director of Accounts 



38 



Report of the 
Town Acountant 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1952 



To the Board of Selectmen, 
Andover, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

In acordance with Chapter 41, Section 61, of the General 
Laws, I submit herewith my annual report for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1952. 

A detailed statement of the receipts and their sources, 
and of the payments and the purposes therefor, follows. 
The condition of the various trust funds, as well as the 
Town of Andover Retirement Fund, sources of incomes and 
the amounts paid out are also set forth. A statement of the 
temporary loans, maturing debt and interest is included. 

A balance sheet, which is appended to this report, was pre- 
pared showing the assets and liabilities as of December 31, 
1952. 

. The State Accountants have complied with statutes and 
audited the Town books for the year ending December 31, 
1951. They are expected in the near future to audit the 
Town's accounts for 1952. 

May I express my thanks for the co-operation accorded 
to me by your Board, as well as by each Town Department 
during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted 

George C. Napier, 
Town Accountant. 



39 



Appropriations for 1952 



APPROPRIATIONS 
TOWN MEETINGS , MARCH 10 and MARCH 17, 1952 

General Government $ 60,272.20 

Protection of Persons & Property 210,149.50 

Health and Sanitation 21,140.00 

Highways 136,761.00 

Charities and Veterans' Service 153,640.00 

Schools and Libraries 460,070.55 

Recreation and Unclassified 89,516.26 

Enterprises and Cemeteries 103,329.00 

Interest and Maturing Debt 91,861.25 



Total Appropriations, March 10 and 

March 17, 1952 $1,326,739.76 



Receipts for 1952 



TAXES 

Current Year: 

Real Estate $ 764,904.75 

Personal Property 106,013.91 

Poll 7,042.00 

Loss of Taxes — State 1,273.80 



Previous Years: 




Real Estate 


36,018.80 


Personal Property 


5,117.45 


Poll 


16.00 


Tax Title Redemptions 


350.78 


Andover Housing Authority 


1,249.07 



$ 879.234.46 



42,752.10 
Amount Carried Forward $921,986.56 

40 



Amount Brought Forward $ 921,986.56 



From the State : 

Corporation Tax 149,735.92 

Income Tax 109,952.40 



LICENSES AND PERMITS 

Selectmen 7,807.00 

Town Clerk 1,110.25 

Police Department 34.00 

Health Department 544.00 

Hawkers' and Pedlers' Licenses - State 108.00 



FINES AND FORFEITS 

Trial Justice $ 25.00 

Police Court 369.00 



GRANTS AND GIFTS 

From the Federal Government : 

Old Age Assistance - Admin. $ 3,839.10 

Old Age Assistance - Aid 58,964.00 
Aid to Dependent Children - Admin. 439.30 

■ Aid to Dependent Children - Aid 8,475.46 

Disability Assistance - Admin. 145.10 

Disability Assistance - Aid 2,067.01 

School Milk - Subsidy 737.20 

School Cafeterias - Subsidy 6,077.22 



From Commonwealth of Massachusetts : 
Meals Tax for Old Age Assistance 4,300.18 
Vocational Education 612.21 

High School Transportation 7,092.00 



$ 259,688.32 
$1,181,674.88 



$ 9,603.25 



394.00 



$ 80,744.39 



$ 12,004.39 



Amount Carried Forward $1,284,420.91 

41 



Amount Brought Forward $1,284,420.91 

From County of Essex : 

Dog Licenses - 1951 2,239.45 

Chapter 90 - Street Construction 2,868.39 

$ 5,107.84 



$ 97,856.62 



PRIVILEGES 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise Taxes : 
Current Year $ 103,546.80 

Prior Years 8,477.96 



$ 112,024.76 

Parking Meter Fees 11,295.16 



$ 123,319.92 



SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS 

Sewer Assessments 1952 2,103.21 

Sewer Assessments 1951 112.31 

Unapportioned Sewer Asses. 1952 403.09 

Unapportioned Sewer Asses. 1950 , 65.55 

Unapportioned Sewer Asses. 1949 398.00 

Unapportioned Sewer Asses. 1948 337.42 

Paid in Advance 1,710.91 



Classified Forest Land 1951 3.20 

Classified Forest Land 1952 5.72 



$ 5,130.49 



$ 8.92 

$ 5,139.41 

DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE 

Selectmen : 

Rent of Court Room 120.00 

Rent of Town Property 1,559.16 

$ 1,679.16 

Amount Carried Forward $1,419,667.24 

42 



Amount Brought Forward 


$1,419,667.24 


Treasurer : 




Historical Booklets 


5.00 


Discount of Treasury Bills 




School Loan 


1,176.00 




$ 1,181.00 


Tax Collector - Certificates of Mu 


nicipal Liens $ 143.00 



Police : 

Damage Parking Meter & Figurene 22.00 
Seizure of Property 27.91 



49.91 



Fire Department: 

Use of Ambulance 35.00 

Oil Burner Permits 147.00 

$ 182.00 

Building Inspector's Fees 2,178.00 

Sealer of Weights and Measures Fees 273.75 

Wire Inspector's Fees 587.00 

Public Weigher's Fees 66.60 

Tree Department — Damage to Trees 80.00 

Health — Tuberculosis Subsidy 594.99 

Sewer — House Connections 115.95 

Board of Public Works — Boat Plates 28.00 

Highways — From State — Snow Plowing 364.00 

Infirmary : 

Board and Care 1,525.50 

" Sale of Surplus Materials 25.92 



Charities : 






i,yyi,tij 


General Relief: 








State 


214.25 






Cities and Towns 


838.00 






Individuals 


4.00 










$ 


1,056.25 


Aid to Dependent Children : 








State 




$ 


6,694.44 


Amount Carried Forward 




$1,434,813.55 



43 






Amount Brought Forward 

Old Age Assistance : 
State 

Cities and Towns 
Individuals' Recoveries 


51,868.18 
1,311.07 

4,888.69 


$1,434,813.55 

$ 58,067.94 
$ 1,584.36 

$ 4,232.07 


Disability Assistance — State 
Veterans Benefits: 

State 

Cities and Towns 


4,217.07 
15.00 






Veterans Service : 
Photostatic Copies 
Sales of Veterans* Lots 


5.00 
35.92 


<K 


4fiQ9 



Schools : 

Tuition — State Wards 864.65 
Tuition — Towns and Individuals 9,334.00 

Rent — Halls and Gymnasium 520.60 

School Cafeterias 27,701.24 

School Milk Fund 1,653.00 

Punchard A. A. 5,407.70 



Libraries : 
Fines, Sales, Damage to Books 
Income from Investments 


1,715.24 

2,750.00 


$ 

$ 


4,465.24 

200.00 


Sale of Real Estate, West Andover 


■ School 

72,972.04 

490.37 

44.65 

3,274.28 


Water Department: 
Metered Rates 
Services 
Miscellaneous 
Water Liens Added to Taxes 


$ 130,897.19 

$ 76,781.34 
$1,625,666.61 


Amount Carried Forward 





44 



Amount Brought Forward 


3 


51,625,666.61 


Cemetery Department: 






Sale of Lots 


37.00 




Care of Lots 


379.00 




Perpetual Care Withdrawals 


2,561.39 




Interments and Tomb 


2,245.00 




Foundations 


450.40 




Miscellaneous 


137.50 


x sain 9Q 



Interest : 

Taxes 1,507.60 

Tax Titles 9.82 

Special Assessments 622.93 

Motor Vehicle & Trailer Ex. Taxes 103.21 



Income : 

Trust and Investments 




V 


1,100.17 


Agency : 








Dog Licenses for County 


2,798.00 






Sewer Connection Deposits 


1,625.00 






Withholding Taxes 


92,317.57 






U. S. Savings Bonds 


4,875.04 






Mass. Hospital Service 


9,012.36 










$ 


110,627.97 






Trust and Investment : 








Cemetery Perpetual Cares 


4,308.00 






Private Trust Accounts 


400.00 










$ 


4,708.00 






Refunds : 








General Departments 


1,541.28 






Petty Cash and Other 


365.35 










$ 


1,906.63 


Total Receipts of 1952 


$1,752,063.23 


Cash on Hand January 1, 1952 






800,563.69 


Grand Total for 1952 


$2,552,626.92 



45 



Expenditures for 1952 



APPROPRIATION ACCOUNTS 





SELECTMEN 




Cr. 

Appropriation 

Dr. 

Salaries, Selectmen $ 

Clerks 
Office Maintenance and Other 


$ 3,585.00 

2,000.00 

1,030.00 

404.33 



$ 3,434.33 
Balance to Revenue 150.67 



$ 3,585.00 $ 3,585.00 



ACCOUNTANT 


Cr. 




Appropriation 


$ 5,298.20 


Transfer from Reserve Fund 


200.00 


Dr. 




Salaries, Accountant 


$ 3,771.15 


Clerk 


1,031.20 


Office Maintenance 


679.43 



$ 5,481.78 
Transfer to Reserve Fund $16.42 



$ 5,498.20 $ 5,498.20 

46 



TREASURER 








Cr. 








Appropriation 






$ 4,870.00 


Transfer from Reserve Fund 






231.00 


Refund 






17.86 


Dr. 








Salary, Treasurer 


$ 


3,700.00 




Wages, Clerks 




449.65 




Office Maintenance and Other 




968.70 






$ 


5,118.35 




Transfer to Reserve Fund 




.51 





$ 5,118.86 $ 5,118.86 

TREASURER PARKING METERS CLERK 

Cr. 

Transfer from Parking Meters Account $ 230.00 

Dr. 
Wages, Parking Meters Clerk $ 230.00 







$ 230.00 


$ 230.00 


TAX COLLECTOR 






Cr. 






Appropriation 


Dr. 




$ 8,238.00 


Salaries, Tax Collector 




$ 3,800.00 




Clerk 




2,505.00 




Office Maintenance 




1,587.66 






$ 7,892.66 




Balance to Revenue 


345.34 





$ 8,238.00 $8,238.00 

47 



ASSESSORS 
Cr. 



Appropriation 




$10,650.00 


Petty Cash Refund 




5.00 


Dr. 






Salaries, Assessors 


$ 1,200.00 




Assistant Assessors 


800.00 




Salaries, Clerks 


4,575.65 




Engineering 


2,902.62 




Petty Cash Account 


5.00 




Office Maintenance and Other 


862.37 






$10,345.64 




Balance to Revenue 


309.36 






$10,655.00 


$10,655.00 


TOWN CLERK 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$ 5,795.00 


Dr. 






Salaries, Town Clerk 


$ 3,800.00 




Clerk 


1,775.00 




Office Maintenance 


140.50 






$5,715.50 




Balance to Revenue 


79.50 






$ 5,795.00 


$ 5,795.00 


ELECTION AND REGISTRATION 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$ 7,462.00 


Transfer from Reserve Fund 




800.00 


Dr. 






Salaries, Clerks 


$ 1,000.35 




Registrars 


457.50 




Assistant Registrars 


800.00 




Amount Carried Forward 


$ 2,257.85 


$ 8,262.00 



48 



Amount Brought Forward $ 2,257.85 $ 8,262.00 

Election Officers 2,297.00 

Election Expenses 1,376.08 

Street Lists 575.00 

Printing and Advertising 1,403.77 

Office Maintenance 323.20 



$ 8,232.90 
Transfer to Reserve Fund 29.10 



$ 8,262.00 $ 8,262.00 
MODERATOR 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 30.00 

Dr. 
Moderator $ 20.00 

Balance to Revenue 10.00 







? 


30.00 


$ 


30.00 




FINANCE COMMITTEE 








Cr. 










Appropriation 








$ 


20.00 


Transfer from Reserve Fund 








3.75 




Dr. 










Membership Fee 




$ 


10.00 






Printing 






13.75 








$ 


23.75 


? 


23.75 




TOWN COUNSEL 










Cr. 










Appropriation 


Dr. 






$ 


750.00 


Salary, Town Counsel 


$ 


500.00 






Services 






190.00 








$ 


690.00 




Balance to Revenue 




60.00 







$ 750.00 $ 750.00 
49 



PLANNING BOARD AND BOARD OF SURVEY 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 200.00 

Dr. 
Salary, Clerk $ 100.00 

Advertisements 29.27 



$ 129.27 
Balance to Revenue 70.73 



$ 200.00 $ 200.00 

MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 7,374.00 

Transfer from Reserve Fund 800.00 

Dr. 

Salary, Janitor $ 2,544.00 

Additional Janitorial Service 109.30 

Fuel 1,345.32 

Lawrence Gas and Electric Company 576.98 

Janitor's Supplies 519.04 

Repairs 1,771.92 

Water Bills and Other 390.79 



$ 7,257.35 
Transfer to Reserve Fund 800.00 

Balance to Revenue 116.65 



$ 8,174.00 $ 8,174.00 

PARKING METERS MAINTENANCE 
Cr. 

Transfer from Parking Meter Receipts $ 3,900.00 

Dr. 
Salary, Police Officer $ 3,286.00 

Maintenance and Repairs 285.62 



$ 3,571.62 
Amount Carried Forward $ 3,571.62 $ 3,900.00 

50 



Amount Brought Forward $ 3,571.62 $ 3.900.00 

Transfer to Parking Meter 

Receipts 328.38 





$ 3,900.00 


$ 3,900.00 


POLICE DEPARTMENT 




Cr. 






Balance from 1951 




$ 2,100.00 


Appropriation 




70,650.00 


Transfer from Reserve Fund 




2,800.00 


Dr. 






Salaries : 






Chief 


$ 4,080.00 




Patrolmen 


52,496.83 




Reserve Police, Clerks, and 






Other Employees 


4,713.42 




Equipment Maintenance 


2,525.44 




Two Way Radio 


2,023.15 




Equipment for Men 


417.80 




Traffic Lights, Signs and Signals 


1,909.25 




Office Maintenance and Other 


1,244.58 






$69,410.47 




Transfer to Revenue 


3,339.53 




Balance to 1953 


2,800.00 





$75,550.00 $75,550.00 

ARTICLE 14.— POLICE DEPARTMENT— TWO NEW 
AUTOMOBILES 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 1,500.00 

Dr. 
Purchase Two New Automobiles $ 1,349.48 



$ 1,349.48 
Balance to Revenue 150.52 



$ 1,500.00 $ 1,500.00 



51 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 





Cr. 






Appropriation 






86,983.00 


Transfer from Reserve Fund 




2,100.00 


Refunds 


Dr. 




3.20 


Salaries : 








Chief 




$ 4,505.00 




Fire Fighters 




68,096.55 




Call Men: 








Central 




3,547.50 




Ballardvale 




1,347.50 




Ambulance Assistance 




27.00 




Equipment 




3,038.69 




Equipment for Men 




512.38 




Maintenance and Repairs 




2,698.77 




Alarm Boxes, Etc. 




652.00 




Fuel 




1,484.95 




Lawrence Gas and Electric Company 499.15 




Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds 2,009.29 




Office Maintenance and Ot] 


her 


666.48 






$89,085.26 




Transfer to Reserve 


Fund .94 








$89,086.20 $ 89,086.20 

ARTICLE 15— FIRE DEPARTMENT— PUMPING ENGINE 

Cr. 



Appropriation 




$17,000.00 


Refund 




8.15 


Dr. 






Purchase Pumping Engine 


$17,000.00 




Balance to Revenue 


8.15 





$17,008.15 $17,008.15 
52 





FOREST FIRES 








Cr. 










Appropriation 


Dr. 






$ 1,800.00 




Salary, Warden 
Wages, Fighting Fires 
Hose 




$ 


225.00 
574.00 
261.04 






Apparatus Maintenance 

Balance to Revenue 




734.08 






$ 


1,794.12 
5.88 






? 


1,800.00 


$ 1,800.00 




DOG OFFICER 










Cr. 










Appropriation 


Dr. 






$ 225.00 




Salary, Dog Officer 




$ 


225.00 





$ 225.00 $ 225.00 
ANNIMAL INSPECTOR 
• Cr. 

Appropriation $ 350.00 

Dr. 
Salary, Animal Inspector $ 325.00 

Balance to Revenue 25.00 



$ 350.00 $ 350.00 
BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 2,355.00 

Dr. 
Salary, Building Inspector $ 1,615.01 

Use of Car, Supplies 330.68 



$ 1,945.69 
Balance to Revenue 409.31 



$ 2,355.00 $ 2,355.00 
53 



WIRE INSPECTOR 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 1,175.00 

Dr. 

Salary, Wire Inspector $ 787.51 

Use of Car, Supplies 134.00 



$ 921.51 
Balance to Revenue 253.49 



$ 1,175.00 $ 1,175.00 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 760.00 

Dr. 
Salary, Sealer Weights & Measures $ 540.00 
Use of Car, Supplies and Other 121.16 



$ 661.16 
Balance to Revenue 98.84 



$ 760.00 $ 760.00 

MOTH SUPPRESSION 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 8,655.00 

Refund 11.91 

Dr. 
Salary, Moth Superintendent $ 1,206.00 

Labor 4,744.54 

Insecticides, Hardware and Tools 1,322.61 

Gasoline, Oil and Truck Maintenance 919.11 
Office Maintenance and Other 197.89 



$ 8,390.15 
Balance to Revenue 276.76 



$ 8,666.91 $ 8,666.91 

54 



CONTROL DUTCH ELM DISEASE 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 8,000.00 

Dr. 
Salary, Tree Warden $ 335.00 

Labor 5,083.02 

Insecticides, Hardware and Tools 2,015.15 

Gasoline, Oil and Truck Maintenance 330.05 
Travel Expenses and Other 115.80 



$ 7,879.02 
Balance to Revenue 120.98 



$ 8,000.00 $ 8,000.00 

TREE WARDEN 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 9,675.00 

Refund 10.58 

Dr. 
Salary, Tree Warden $ 2,010.00 

Labor 5,736.80 

Trees, Loam, Hardware and Tools 765.36 

Gasoline, Oil and Truck Maintenance 832.68 
Office Maintenance and Travel Expenses 209.98 



$ 9,554.82 
Balance to Revenue 130.76 



$ 9,685.58 $ 9,685.58 

ARTICLE 29— TREE DEPARTMENT— MOWING 

MACHINE AND ATTACHMENTS 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 171.50 

Dr. 
Purchase Dearborn Mower 

with Attachments $ 171.50 



$ 171.50 $ 171.50 

55 



ARTICLE 30— TREE DEPARTMENT— CHAIN SAW 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 850.00 

Dr. 
Purchase Homelite Chain Saw $ 847.44 

Balance to Revenue 2.56 







$ 850.00 


$ 850.00 


HEALTH DEPARTMENT 




• 


Cr. 






Appropriation 






$ 7,040.00 


Petty Cash Refund 


Dr. 




10.00 


Salaries, Board of Health 




?. 300.00 




Agent 




2,925.00 




Clerical Assistance 




121.50 




Petty Cash Account 




10.00 




Office Maintenance 




665.07 




Agent, Use of Car 




487.50 




Contagious Diseases 




195.00 




Vital Statistics 




13.50 




Plumbing Inspector 




556.00 




Dog Vaccinations 




334.94 




Baby Clinic 




433.02 




Milk Inspector, Salary anc 


Expen 


ses 342.03 






$ 6,383.56 




Balance to Revenue 


666.44 





$ 7,050.00 $ 7,050.00 
CARE AND TREATMENT OF TUBERCULAR PATIENTS 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 3,000.00 

Dr. 
Care and Treatment of Tubercular 

Patients $ 2,212.50 

Balance to Revenue 787.50 



$ 3,000.00 $ 3,000.00 



56 



ESSEX COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL 

Cr. 

Balance from 1951 $ 614.15 

Appropriation 18,762.39 

Dr. 
Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital $18,412.97 
Revenue 1952 614.15 



$19,027.12 
Balance to 1953 349.42 



$19,376.54 $19,376.54 

PUBLIC DUMP 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 2,000.00 

Dr. 
Salary, Keeper of Dump $ 1,260.00 

Labor and Gravel 158.69 



$ 1,418.69 
Balance to Revenue 581.31 



$ 2,000.00 $ 2,000.00 

SEWER MAINTENANCE 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 6,600.00 

Transfer from Reserve Fund 150.00 

Dr. 
Labor $ 3,396.21 

Lawrence Gas and Electric Company 2,487.38 
Tools, Equipment and Other 780.96 



$ 6,664.55 
Balance to Reserve Fund 85.45 



$ 6,750.00 $ 6,750.00 

57 



ARTICLE 25— SEWER MAIN— MAGNOLIA AVENUE 

Cr. 



Appropriation 


Dr. 




$ 2,500.00 


Labor 




$ 775.24 




Pipe, Manhole Covers 




389.49 




Shovel Hire 




320.00 




Equipment, Tarvia 




367.85 




Engineering and Other 




191.83 






$ 2,044.41 




Balance to 1953 




455.59 





$ 2,500.00 $ 2,500.00 

HIGHWAYS MAINTENANCE 
Cr. 



Appropriation 

Dr. 
Labor 


$56,550.00 


$34,070.72 


Pipe and Fittings 


238.22 


Tools and Equipment 


2,375.99 


Asphalt, Tarvia and Road Oil 


18,190.53 


Maintenance, Gasoline and Oil 


222.40 


Broken Stone, Gravel, Etc. 


609.24 


Use of Cars 


557.75 


Telephone and Other 


175.88 



$56,440.73 
Balance to Revenue 109.27 



$56,550.00 $56,550.00 

TRUCKS, GARAGE AND REPAIR SHOP MAINTENANCE 

Cr. 

Appropriation $13,011.00 

Dr. 
Labor $ 4,287.37 

Gasoline, Oil and Truck Maintenance 5,758.29 
Amount Carried Forward $10,045.66 $13,011.00 

58 



Amount Brought Forward $10,045.66 $13,011.00 

Fuel Oil 525.18 

Equipment, Hardware and Tools 1,520.16 

Lawrence Gas and Electric Company 413.86 
Recovering Roof 250.00 

Telephone and Other 218.88 



$12,973.74 
Balance to Revenue 37.26 



$13,011.00 $13,011.00 

ARTICLE 17— 1951— REPAIR AND BUILD SIDEWALKS 

Cr. 



Balance from 1951 


Dr. 




$ 


1,811.62 


Labor 




$ 1,335.09 






Equipment 




182.53 






Asphalt and Tarvia 




294.00 








$ 1,811.62 


$ 


1,811.62 


ARTICLE 18—1951- 


-IMPROVEMENT OF SHAWSHEEN 




ROAD 










Cr. 








Balance from 1951 


Dr. 




$ 


581.87 


Labor 




$ 19.20 






Balance to Surplus Revenue 


562.67 







$ 581.87 $ 581.87 

ARTICLE 19— 1951— WIDENING GREENWOOD ROAD 

Cr. 

Balance from 1951 $ 125.31 

Dr. 

Labor and Moving Bulldozer $ 125.31 



$ 125.31 $ 125.31 

59 



ARTICLE 19— IMPROVEMENT BEACON STREET 

Cr. 



Appropriation 




Dr. 




$ 7,000.00 


Labor 






$ 3,365.13 




Pipe and Grates 






516.29 




Equipment 






235.35 




Tar Patch 






1,799.60 




Shovel Hire 






120.00 






$ 6,036.37 




Balance 


j to 1953 




963.63 






$ 7,000.00 


$ 7,000.00 


ARTICLE 


20— CHAPTER 


90_MAINTENANCE 






Cr. 






Appropriation 




Dr. 




$ 2,000.00 


Labor 






$ 670.29. 




Asphalt 






821.61 




Crushed Stone 






508.10 





$ 2,000.00 $ 2,000.00 

ARTICLE 21— BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS TRACTOR 

WITH ATTACHMENTS 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 2,200.00 

Dr. 
Purchase Tractor with Attachments $ 2,200.00 



$ 2,200.00 $ 2,200.00 

ARTICLE 22— REPAIR AND BUILD SIDEWALKS 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 5,000.00 

Dr. 
Labor $ 2,612.80 

Tarvia and Tar Patch 2,258.09 

Amount Carried Forward $ 4,870.89 $ 5,000.00 

60 



Amount Brought Forward 




$ 4,870.89 


$ 5,000.00 


Sand, Cement and Other 




53.31 






$ 4,924.20 




Balance to 1953 




75.80 






$ 5,000.00 


$ 5,000.00 


SNOW REMOVAL AND SANDING 






Cr. 






Appropriation 


Dr. 




$25,000.00 


Labor 




$15,520.12 




Tools and Equipment 




3,030.00 




Maintenance, Gasoline and Oil 


1,186.59 




Salt 




2,042.88 




Sand 




280.80 




Snow Plowing 




2,712.25 




Weather Service 




172.69 






$24,945.33 




Balance to Reveni 


ie 


54.67 






$25,000.00 


$25,000.00 


STREET LIGHTING 






Cr. 






Appropriation 


Dr. 




$24,500.00 


Street Lighting 




$24,197.73 




Balance to Revenue 




302.27 





$24,500.00 $24,500.00 

PUBLIC WELFARE 
Cr. 

Appropriation $13,700.00 

Refunds 43.50 

Dr. 
Salaries, Board of Public Welfare $ 300.00 
Amount Carried Forward $ 300.00 $13,743.50 

61 



Amount Brought Forward 


$ 300.00 


$13,743.50 


Salaries, Agent 


498.87 




Clerk 


371.00 




Groceries and Provisions 


1,050.95 




Board and Care 


1,072.00 




State Institutions 


1,730.89 




Cash Grants to Individuals 


1,982.90 




Relief by Other Cities and Towns 


1,852.58 




Medical Attendance 


18.00 






$ 8,877.19 




Balance to Revenue 


4,866.31 




■ 


$13,743.50 


$13,743.50 


DISABILITY ASSISTANCE 




(TOWN) 






Cr. 






Appropriation 




$ 5,300.00 


Dr. 






Disability Assistance 


$ 4,774.88 




Balance to Revenue 


525.12 





$ 5,300.00 $ 5,300.00 

DISABILITY ASSISTANCE 
(FEDERAL GRANTS) 

Cr. 

Federal Grants Received in 1952 $ 2,212.11 

Dr 
Administration : 

Salary, Agent $ 133.63 

Disability Assistance 1,618.55 



$ 1,752.18 
Balance to 1953 459.93 



$ 2,212.11 $ 2,212.11 



62 



AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN 

(TOWN) 

Cr. 

Appropriation $17,500.00 

Dr. 
Administration : 

Salaries, Agent $ 399.72 

Clerk 282.34 

Aid: 
Aid to Dependent Children 11,854.09 



$12,536.15 
Balance to Revenue 4,963.85 



$17,500.00 $17,500.00 



AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN 
(FEDERAL GRANTS) 

Cr. 



Federal Grants Received in 1952 




$ 8,914.76 


Dr. 






Administration : 






Salaries, Agent 


$ 298.28 




Clerk 


133.66 




Aid: 






Aid to Dependent Children 


8,475.46 






$ 8,907.40 




Balance to 1953 


7.36 






$ 8,914.76 


$ 8,914.76 


OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 




(TOWN) 






Cr. 






Appropriation 




$87,000.00 


Refunds 




255.70 


Amount Carried Forward 




$87,255.70 


63 







Amount Brought Forward 




$87,255.70 


Dr. 

Administration : 


• 




Salaries, Agent 

Clerk 
Office Maintenance 


$ 778.75 

652.51 

86.08 




Aid: 






Old Age Assistance 

Paid to Other Cities and Towns 


66,743.64 
1,259.93 




Balance to Revenue 


$69,520.91 
17,734.79 





$87,255.70 $87,255.70 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 
(FEDERAL GRANTS) 





Cr. 






Balance from 1951 






$ 8,165.80 


Federal Grants Received 


in 1952 




62,803.10 


Recoveries 






824.63 


Refund 


Dr. 




60.40 


Administration : 








Salaries, Agent 




$ 1,780.00 




Clerk 




1,262.14 




Office Maintenance 




391.04 




Aid: 








Old Age Assistance 




66,985.67 






$70,418.85 




Balance to 1953 




1,435.08 





$71,853.93 $71,853.93 

64 



INFIRMARY 




Cr. 




Appropriation 

Dr. 

Salary, Matron $ 


$12,640.00 


1,460.00 


Other Employees 


2,786.00 


Groceries and Provisions 


3,466.65 


Dry Goods and Clothing 


150.54 


Maintenance Buildings and Grounds 


258.87 


Fuel 


691.82 


Lawrence Gas and Electric Company 


440.13 


Household Furnishings and Supplies 


865.88 


Medicine and Medical Service 


596.74 


Use of Car 


207.99 


Telephone and Other 


270.50 


Funeral Expense 


150.00 



Balance to Revenue 



$11,345.12 

1,294.88 







$12,640.00 


$12,640.00 


VETERANS' SERVICE 






Cr. 






Appropriation 


Dr. 




$17,500.00 


Administration : 








Salaries, Agent 




$ 4,015.81 




Clerk 




2,385.00 




Clerk, Photostats 




79.10 




Office Maintenance 




535.57 




Veterans' Benefits: 








Cash Allowances 




8,476.09 




Provisions, Fuel, Rent and Other 


786.14 




Medical 




1,048.27 




Veterans' Burials 




70.00 





Balance to Revenue 



$17,395.98 
104.02 



$17,500.00 $17,500.00 



65 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 




Cr. 






Appropriation 


$ 


426,356.00 


Transfer from Reserve Fund 




4,535.00 


Petty Cash Refunds 




65.00 


Refunds 




23.30 


Dr. 






Salaries, Superintendent $ 


7,869.22 




Clerks 


8,047.05 




Attendance Officer 


100.00 




Petty Cash Account 


65.00 




Office Maintenance 


2,897.27 




Meals and Use of Cars 


785.85 


- 


School Census and Other 


162.34 




Teachers' Salaries: 






High 


75,325.61 




Junior High 


63,427.45 




Elementary 


151,160.12 




Text Books and Supplies : 






High 


5,843.42 




Junior High 


3,368.08 




Elementary 


8,522.84 




Tuition, High 


979.99 




Transportation : 






High 


6,141.52 




Junior High 


6,139.92 




Elementary 


6,154.24 




Janitors' Services: 






High 


11,039.46 




Junior High 


11,039.45 




Elementary 


11,039.88 




Fuel: 






High 


7,035.69 




Junior High 


6,602.73 




Elementary 


11,665.72 




Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds : 




High 


4,394.15 




Junior High and Elementary 


8,258.75 




Amount Carried Forward $ 


418,065.75 $ 


430,979.30 



66 



Amount Brought Forward $ 418,065.75 $ 430,979.30 

Health: 

High 2,490.12 

Junior High 2,482.94 

Elementary 2,397.23 

Lawrence Gas and Electric Company : 

High 1,824.66 

Junior High 1,773.38 

Elementary 1,731.86 

Student Drivers' Car 203.11 



$ 430,969.05 
Balance to Reserve Fund 10.25 



$ 430,979.30 $ 430,979.30 
ARTICLE 16— STATE-AIDED VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 



Appropriation 

Teachers' Salaries 
Tuition, Cities and Towns 
Equipment and other 


Cr 
Dr 

ie 


$ 


1,226.94 
141.60 
160.91 


1,550.00 


Balance to Revenu 


$ 


1,529.45 
20.55 






$ 


1,550.00 $ 


1,550.00 



SMITH - HUGHES - GEORGE - BARDEN FUND 

Cr. 

Balance from 1951 $ 27.41 

From State 12.65 

Dr. 

Teacher's Salary $ 40.06 



$ 40.06 $ 40.06 

67 



ARTICLE 1— SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION 
Cr. 

Balance from 1951 $ 409,554.60 

Refunds 913.37 

Dr. 

CENTRAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 



Walter L. Ritchie, Contractor 


$ 


227,405.41 


Architects 




5,167.89 


Clerk of Works 




3,056.27 


Labor 




750.37 


Plumbing 




1,569.30 


Furniture and Furnishings 




23,182.98 


Janitors' Supplies 




1,291.84 


Landscaping 




460.00 


Cafeteria Supplies 




1,005.62 


Office Supplies 




627.56 


Medical Supplies and Other 




248.64 




$ 


264.765.88 


WEST CENTER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 


Walter L. Ritchie, Contractor 


$ 


96,856.38 


Architects 




1,947.84 


Clerk of Works 




919.98 


Labor 




233.11 


Plumbing 




212.04 


Furniture and Furnishings 




10,269.35 


Janitors' Supplies 
Landscaping 




748.05 
490.00 


Cafeteria Supplies 




580.50 


Purchase of Land 




500.00 


Office Supplies 




959.23 


Medical Supplies and Other 




110.11 




$ 


113,826.59 




$ 


378,592.47 


Balance to 1953 


? 


31,875.50 


* 


1 i 


110,467.97 $ 410,467.97 


68 







SCHOOL CAFETERIAS 
Cr. 



Balance from 1951 






$ 919.03 


Receipts in 1952 






33,778.46 


Petty Cash Refunds 


Dr. 




75.00 


Salaries, Supervisors 




$ 3,550.00 




Cafeteria Assistants 




7,937.17 




Groceries and Provisions 




21,076.79 




Maintenance of Kitchens 




1,836.00 




Petty Cash Account 




75.00 




Express, Telephone and Ot 


her 


260.93 






$34,735.89 




Balance to 1953 




36.60 






$34,772.49 


$34,772.49 


SCHOOL MILK FUND 






Cr. 






Balance from 1951 






$ 26.46 


Receipts in 1952 


Dr. 




2,390.20 


Purchase of Milk 




$ 1,905.69 




Purchase of Used Frigidai: 


re 


50.00 






$ 1,955.69 




Balance to 1953 




460.97 





$ 2,416.66 $ 2,416.66 

PUNCHARD ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

Cr. 

Balance from 1951 $ 161.06 

Receipts in 1952 5,330.70 

Petty Cash Refund 100.00 

Refunds Insurance 186.01 

Amount Carried Forward $ 5,777.77 

69 



Amount Brought Forward 

Dr. 
Salary, Director of Athletics $ 




$ 5,777.77 


150.00 




Services, Officials at Games 


503.00 




Equipment 


1,164.12 




Medical Attendance and Supplies 


512.79 




Police and Janitor Service 


351.00 




Insurance 


759.00 




Game Guarantees 


1,021.80 




Programs, Tickets and Ticket Selling 


268.48 




Transportation and Meals 


652.59 




Petty Cash Account 


100.00 




Telephone and Other 


115.86 





$ 5,598.64 
Balance to 1953 179.13 







$ 5,777.77 


$ 5,777.77 


MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 




Appropriation 


Kj>l. 




$32,164.55 


Dog Account Refund 






2,239.45 


Income from Investments 


Dr. 




2,750.00 


Salaries, Librarian 


$ 4,326.02 




Assistants 




15,113.84 




Treasurer 




100.00 




Janitors 




3,217.02 




Books and Periodicals 




7,207.85 




Bindings 




1,126.21 




Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds 2,338.17 




Fuel and Light 




1,726.47 




Office Maintenance 




1,843.73 




Express and Other 




152.12 





$37,151.43 
Balance to Revenue 2.57 



$37,154.00 $37,154.00 



70 



CIVIL DEFENSE 
Cr. 



Balance from 1951 




$ 137.36 


Appropriation 




6,000.00 


Petty Cash Refunds 




50.00 


Dr. 






Salaries, Directors 


$ 3,013.33 




Clerical Assistance 


97.50 




Petty Cash Account 


50.00 




Office Maintenance 


437.93 




Maintenance and Equipment 


714.11 




Transportation, Meals and Other 


140.11 






$ 4,452.98 




Balance to 1953 


1,734.38 





$ 6,187.36 $ 6,187.36 



DAMAGES TO PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 500.00 

Dr. 
Damages to Persons and Property $ 201.38 
Balance to Revenue 298.62 



$ 500.00 $ 500.00 





Cr. 






Appropriation 






$22,000.00 


Refund 


Dr. 




9.00 


Insurance 




$21,996.62 




Balance to Revenue 




12.38 





$22,009.00 $22,009.00 
71 



ARTICLE 2— 1951— SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

PURCHASE LAND ADJACENT TO CENTRAL SCHOOLS 

AND PLAYSTEAD 

Cr. 

Balance from 1951 $ 4,998.00 

Dr. 
Purchase of Land $ 1,809.85 

Balance to 1953 3,188.15 



$ 4,998.00 $ 4,998.00 
ARTICLE 12— SHAW PROPERTY PARKING LOT 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 7,000.00 

Dr. 
Labor $ 24.12 

Moving Bulldozer 15.00 



$ 39.12 
Balance to 1953 6,960.88 



$ 7,000.00 $ 7,000.00 
ARTICLE 13— PLUMBING AND HEATING FACILITIES 
OLD SCHOOL HOUSE BALLARDVALE 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 5,500.00 

Dr. 
John J. Gaffny & Sons, Contractors $ 5,201.90 
Engineer 273.10 

$ 5,475.00 
Balance to Revenue 25.00 



$ 5,500.00 $ 5,500.00 
EUGENE V. LOVELY PENSION 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 2,354.00 

Dr. 
Eugene V. Lovely Pension $ 2,354.00 



$ 2,354.00 $ 2,354.00 

72 



TOWN REPORTS 

Cr. 

Appropriation 

Dr. 

Printing Town Reports $ 


1,320.00 


$ 1,320.00 


$ 

TOWN SCALES 

Cr. 

Appropriation 

Dr. 

Salary, Public Weigher $ 
Labor and Materials 


1,320.00 

100.00 
53.25 


$ 1,320.00 
$ 200.00 


Balance to Revenue 


$ 


153.25 
46.75 





$ 200.00 $ 200.00 



ADMINISTRATIVE AND OFFICE, 
BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Cr. 



Appropriation 




$18,615.00 


Petty Cash Refund 




50.00 


Dr. 






Salaries, Chairman, B. P. W. 


$ 300.00 




Superintendent 


5,300.00 




Engineer 


4,306.50 




Clerks 


7,512.00 




Petty Cash Account 


50.00 




Office Maintenance 


1,193.13 






$18,661.63 




Balance to Revenue 


3.37 





$18,665.00 $18,665.00 

73 



PARK DEPARTMENT 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 6,450.00 

Dr. 
Labor $ 5,059.65 

Cedar Post and Rail Fence 599.85 

Rental and Maintenance of Grounds 373.00 
Equipment 411.81 



$ 6,444.31 
Balance to Revenue 5.69 



$ 6,450.00 $ 6,450.00 

ARTICLE 22— 1951— ENCLOSING ROGERS BROOK 

Cr. 



Balance from 1951 




$ 4,740.30 


Dr. 






Labor 


$ 656.55 




Pipe 


2,412.00 




Unit Clam 


743.75 




Equipment 


132.87 






$ 3,945.17 




Balance to 1953 


795.13 






$ 4,740.30 


$ 4,740.30 


RECREATION 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$10,000.00 


Refunds 




23.36 



Dr. 

Playgrounds : 

Salaries, Instructors $ 3,350.25 
Police, Matron and Other Employees 108.00 

Labor 174.12 

Repairs 812.19 

Entertainment 386.75 

Miscellaneous Supplies 737.55 

Amount Carried Fortvard $ 5,568.86 $10,023.36 

74 



Amount Brought Forward $ 5,568.86 $10,023.36 

Pomps Pond: 
Salaries, 

Lifeguards, Matron and Others 2,584.00 

Transportation 505.00 

Repairs 636.07 

Equipment 365.53 

Miscellaneous Expenses 150.05 

Skating : 

Scraping and Flooding 123.85 

Plowing 90.00 



$10,023.36 $10,023.36 

AMERICAN LEGION QUARTERS 
Gr. 

Appropriation $ 600.00 

Dr. 
Rent for Quarters $ 600.00 



$ 600.00 $ 600.00 

DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS QUARTERS 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 480.00 

Dr. 

Rent for Quarters $ 480.00 



$ 480.00 $ 480.00 

VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS QUARTERS 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 600.00 

Dr. 
Rent for Quarters $ 600.00 



$ 600.00 $ 600.00 

75 



ARMISTICE DAY 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 150.00 

Dr. 
Showing of Film $ 75.00 

Wreaths 12.00 



$ 87.00 
Balance to Revenue 63.00 



$ 


150.00 


$ 150.00 


MEMORIAL DAY 






Cr. 






Appropriation 




$ 1,350.00 


Refund 




3.90 


Dr. 






Bands and Sound Service $ 


445.00 




Flowers and Wreaths 


575.50 




Flags and Markers 


165.29 




Transportation and Refreshments 


135.68 





$ 1,321.47 
Balance to Revenue 32.43 





$ 1,353.90 


$ 1,353.90 


WATER DEPARTMENT 




^r. 

Appropriation 




$51,950.00 


Transfer from Reserve Fund 

Dr. 
Office Maintenance 




1,500.00 


$ 746.55 




Labor 


16,891.36 




Lawrence Gas and Electric Company 9,854.75 




Pipe and Fittings 


2,540.04 




Meters and Fittings 


4,056.41 




Equipment, Hardware and Tools 


1,172.21 




Chlorine and Lime 


1,082.40 




All Other 


204.94 




Amount Carried Forward 

76 


$36,548.66 


$53,450.00 



Amount Brought Forward $36,548.66 $53,450.00 

Maintenance of Pumping Station 16,808.06 

$53,356.72 
Balance to Reserve Fund 93.28 



$53,450.00 $53,450.00 
ARTICLE 1—1950— SUPPLEMENTARY WARRANT 
ENGINE DRIVEN CENTRIFUGAL PUMP 
Cr. 

Balance from 1951 $ 1,467.31 

Dr. 
Engineering $ 335.44 

Balance to 1953 1,131.87 



$ 1,467.31 $ 1,467.31 
ARTICLE 17— RESERVOIR LAND— BANCROFT ROAD 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 4,000.00 

Dr. 

Purchase of Land $ 4,000.00 







$ 4,000.00 


$ 4,000.00 


ARTICLE 18—16" LOW SERVICE 


MAIN 




Cr. 






Appropriation 






$25,000.00 


Transfer from Surplus '. 


Revenue 
Dr. 




30,000.00 


Labor 




$ 9,359.22 




Pipe and Gate Valves 




31,207.08 




Back-hoe 




5,929.50 




Compressor and Blasting 




1,426.50 




Tools and Equipment 




1,519.08 




Mixture 




499.24 




Police and Other 




354.69 






$50,295.31 




Balance to 1953 




4,704.69 





$55,000.00 $55,000.00 
77 



ARTICLE 21— 1951— EXTENDING AND IMPROVING 
. WATER SYSTEM 
Cr. 

Balance from 1951 $ 2,020.09 

Dr. 
Labor 703.20 

Pipe 1,286.43 

All Other 30.46 



$ 2,020.09 $ 2,020.09 

ARTICLE 23— 1951— ACQUISITION LAND/OR LAND 

AND BUILDINGS HAGGETTS POND 

Cr. 

Balance from 1951 $ 723.40 

Dr. 

Labor $ 231.60 

Engineering 486.30 





$ 


717.90 


Balance to Revenue 




5.50 




$ 


723.40 $ 723.40 


ARTICLE 23— EXTENDING AND IMPROVING 


WATER SYSTEM 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$ 5,000.00 


Dr. 






Labor 


$ 


680.34 


Pipe 




182.26 


Back-hoe 




407.63 


All Other 




51.00 




$ 


1,321.23 


Balance to 1953 




3,678.77 



$ 5,000.00 $ 5,000.00 
78 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 
Cr. 



Appropriation 
Perpetual Cares Interest 
Petty Cash Refund 



$17,379.00 

2,561.39 

10.00 



Dr. 



Salaries, Superintendent 

Clerk 
Labor 

Office Maintenance 
Petty Cash Account 
Equipment, Tools & Truck Maint. 
Seed, Loam and Gravel 
Bituminous Concrete and Use of Roller 636.30 
Containers 602.00 



$ 1,823.25 

200.00 

11,996.20 

176.64 

10.00 

1,418.20 

438.80 



Balance to Revenue 



$17,301.39 
2,649.00 





$19,950.39 


$19,950.39 


Appropriation 
Interest 


INTEREST 
Cr. 

Dr. 

$12,861.25 


$12,861.25 




$12,861.25 


$12,861.25 


Appropriation 
General Loans 


MATURING DEBT 
Cr. 

$ 
Dr. 

$79,000.00 


79,000.00 



Town Clerk's Dog License Money 
Cemetery Perpetual Cares 
Private Trust Funds 



Amount Carried Forward 



$79,000.00 $ 79,000.00 

2,807.00 

4,987.32 

820.85 

$1,846,405.66 



79 



Amount Brought Forward 


$1,846,405.66 


Essex County Tax 




59,545.81 


Retirement Fund 




21,751.26 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts 




3,609.32 


Withholding Taxes 




92,317.57 


U. S. Savings Bonds 




4,842.41 


Mass. Hospital Service 




8,601.26 


Tailings 




3.92 


Refunds 




5,438.05 


Total Expenditures of 1952 


$2,042,515.26 


Cash on Hand January 1, 1953 




510,111.66 


Grand Total for 1952 


$2,552,626.92 


RESERVE FUND 




Cr. 






Transferred from Overlay Surplus 




$20,000.00 


Transfer of Balances 

Dr. 
Treasurer 




1,035.95 


$ 231.00 




Accountant 


200.00 




Finance Committee 


3.75 




Elections and Registration 


800.00 


• 


Municipal Buildings 


800.00 




Police Department 


2,800.00 




Fire Department 


2,100.00 




Sewer Department 


150.00 




School Department 


4,535.00 




Water Department 


1,500.00 






$13,119.75 




Balance to Overlay Surplus 


5 7,916.20 






$21,035.95 


$21,035.95 


TAXES 1949 






Balance from 1951 


$ 190.73 




Collected in 1952 




$ 190.73 



$ 190.73 $ 190.73 



80 



TAXES 1950 



Balance from 1951 
Collected in 1952 
Tax Titles Taken 
Abated 
Balance to 1953 



$ 5,544.34 



$ 4,630.89 
164.70 
575.05 
173.70 





$ 5,544.34 


$ 5,544.34 


TAXES 


1951 




Balance from 1951 


$43,854.61 




Refund 


70.00 




Collected in 1952 




$34,967.06 


Real Estate Taxes 1952 




125.50 


Tax Titles Taken 




24.00 


Tax Titles Added 




290.00 


Abated 




226.80 


Balance to 1953 




8,291.25 




$43,924.61 


$43,924.61 


TAXES 


1952 




Commitments 


$939,750.67 




Refunds 


1,575.83 




Real Estate Taxes 1951 


125.50 




Overlay 1952 


45.10 




Collected in 1952 




$877,960.66 


Tax Titles Added 




279.40 


Estimated Receipts 




.03 


Abated 




12,616.93 


Balance to 1953 




50,640.08 



$941,497.10 $941,497.10 

ESTATE OF DECEASED PERSONS 

Balance from 1951 $ 1,363.57 

Collected in 1952 $ 1,363.57 



$ 1,363.57 $ 1,363.57 



81 



TAX TITLE ACCOUNT 

Balance from 1951 $ 967.97 

Tax Titles Taken 268.65 

Tax Titles Added 592.76 

Redemptions $ 340.78 

Balance to 1953 1,488.60 



$ 1,829.38 $ 1,829.38 

TAX TITLE POSSESSIONS 

Balance from 1951. $ 841.42 

Balance to 1953 $ 841.42 



$ 841.42 $ 841.42 

MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE TAXES 1949 

Balance from 1951 $ 47.00 

Collected in 1952 $ .68 

Abated 46.32 



$ 47.00 $ 47.00 

MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE TAXES 1950 

Balance from 1951 $ 122.77 

Collected in 1952 $ 66.19 

Abated 56.58 



$ 122.77 $ 122.77 

MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE TAXES 1951 

Balance from 1951 $ 5,988.21 

Commitments in 1952 3,640.33 

Refunds 197.54 

Motor Vehicle & Trailer Ex. Taxes 1952 153.05 

Collected in 1952 $ 8,564.14 

Abated 382.28 

Balance to 1953 1,032.71 



$ 9,979.13 $ 9,979.13 

82 



MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE TAXES 1952 
Commitments $114,019.51 

Refunds 3,026.41 

Collected in 1952 $103,393.75 

Motor Vehicle & Trailer Ex. Taxes 1951 153.05 

Abated 6,871.65 

Balance to 1953 6,627.47 



$117,045.92 $117,045.92 
CLASSIFIED FOREST LAND 1951 

Balance from 1951 $ 3.20 

Collected in 1952 $ 3.20 



$ 3.20 $ 3.20 

CLASSIFIED FOREST LAND 1952 

Commitment $ 5.72 

Collected in 1952 $ 5.72 



$ 5.72 $ 5.72 

UNAPPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1948 
Balance from 1951 $ 361.50 

Collected in 1952 $ 337.42 

Abated 24.08 



$ 361.50 $ 361.50 

UNAPPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1949 
Balance from 1951 $ 3,775.31 

Collected in 1952 $ 398.00 

Unapportioned Sewer Assessments Not Due 1,910.40 

Balance to 1953 1,466.91 



$ 3,775.31 $ 3,775.31 

UNAPPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1950 
Balance from 1951 $ 1,316.36 

Collected in 1952 $ 65.55 

Sewer Assessments 1952 1,250.81 



$ 1,316.36 $ 1,316.36 

83 



UNAPPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1952 

Commitment $ 1,279.50 

Collected in 1952 $ 403.09 

Apportioned 431.83 

Balance to 1953 444.58 



$ 1,279.50 $ 1,279.50 

SEWER ASSESSMENTS PAID IN ADVANCE 

Commitments $ 1,710.91 

Collected in 1952 $ 1,710.91 



$ 1,710.91 $ 1,710.91 

SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1951 

Balance from 1951 $ 112.31 

Collected in 1952 $ 112.31 



$ 112.31 $ 112.31 

SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1952 

Commitments $ 1,694.55 

Unapportioned Sewer Assessments 1950 649.82 
Collected in 1952 $ 1,502.22 

Balance to 1953 842.15 



$ 2,344.37 $ 2,344.37 

COMMITTED INTEREST ON SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1951 

Balance from 1951 $ 37.48 

Collected in 1952 $ 37.48 



$ 37.48 $ 37.48 

COMMITTED INTEREST ON SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1952 

Commitments $ 521.46 

Collected in 1952 $ 448.97 

Balance to 1953 72.49 



$ 521.46 $ 521.46 

84 



Balance from 1951 
Overlay Surplus 


OVERLAY 1949 

$ 190.73 


$ 190.73 




$ 190.73 


$ 190.73 


Balance from 1951 
Abatements 
Overlay Surplus 
Balance to 1953 


OVERLAY 1950 

$ 575.05 

4,795.59 

173.70 


$ 5,544.34 




$ 5,544.34 


$ 5,544.34 


Balance from 1951 
Abatements 
Overlay 1952 
Overlay Surplus 
Balance to 1953 


OVERLAY 1951 

$ 226.80 

125.50 

9,492.83 

8,291.25 


$18,136.38 




$18,136.38 


$18,136.38 


OVERLAY 1952 
Overlay 1952 
Real Estate Taxes 1952 
Overlay 1951 

Abatements $12,616.93 
Balance to 1953 15,417.43 


$27,863.76 

45.10 

125.50 




$28,034.36 


$28,034.36 


OVERLAY SURPLUS 

Balance from 1951 

Overlays 1949-1950-1951 

Reserve Fund Unexpended Balance 

Transferred to Reserve Fund $20,000.00 

Balance to 1953 34,146.10 


$31,750.75 

14,479.15 

7,916.20 




$54,146.10 


$54,146.10 



85 



DEPARTMENTAL ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Balances from 1951 $ 4,260.57 

Charges, Accounts Receivable in 1952 82,115.25 

Refunds 278.05 

Balance from 1951 $ 85.00 

Collected in 1952 82,571.52 

Abated 20.00 

Balance to 1953 235.00 4,212.35 



$86,888.87 $86,888.87 
STATE AND COUNTY AID TO HIGHWAYS 
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Balance from 1951 $ 2,888.22 

Collected in 1952 $ 2,868.39 

Article 16 — Improvement Lowell St. 19.83 



$ 2,888.22 $ 2,888.22 
WATER RATES ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Balance from 1951 $12,116.30 

Commitments, Charges, 1952 74,657.10 

Water Revenue 98.90 

Collected in 1952 $72,972.04 

Water Liens Added to Taxes 1,570.57 

Balance to 1953 12,329.69 



$86,872.30 $86,872.30 
WATER SERVICES AND MISCELLANEOUS 
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Balance from 1951 $ 215.44 

Charges 509.82 

Collected in 1952 $ 535.02 

Balance to 1953 190.24 



$ 725.26 $ 725.26 
WATER LIENS ADDED TO TAXES 1949 
Balance from 1951 $ 32.29 

Balance to 1953 $ 32.29 



$ 32.29 $ 32.29 

86 



WATER LIENS ADDED TO TAXES 1950 

Balance from 1951 $ 192.70 

Collected in 1952 $ 192.70 



$ 192.70 $ 192.70 

WATER LIENS ADDED TO TAXES 1951 

Balance from 1951 $ 1,971.88 

Collected in 1952 $ 1,705.73 

Tax Titles 17.00 

Balance to 1953 249.15 



$ 1,971.88 $ 1,971.88 

WATER LIENS ADDED TO TAXES 1952 

Water Rates $ 1,570.57 

Collected in 1952 $ 1,375.85 

Water Revenue 17.66 

Balance to 1953 177.06 



$ 1,570.57 $ 1,570.57 

SURPLUS REVENUE 

Balance from 1951 $321,815.95 

Unexpended Appropriation Balances 1951 5,868.50 

Estate of Deceased Persons Revenue 1,363.57 

Tax Title Revenue 340.78 

Old Age Assistance Recovery 765.59 

Disability Assistance 24.15 

Accrued Interest School Loan 700.00 

Article 16, Improvement Lowell St. 1.67 

Revenue 1952 165,309.00 

Refunds 52.04 
Article 18, Low Service Force Main $ 30,000.00 
Revenue '52 (to Reduce '52 Tax Rate) 65,000.00 
Tax Titles 758.10 
Balance to 1953 400,483.15 



$496,241.25 $496,241.25 

87 



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Report of the 
Trustees of Punchard Free School 



Year Ending December 31, 1952 

PRINCIPAL FUND 

January 1, 1952 

Cash in Banks $21,106.03 

Real Estate Mortgages 22,874.05 

Bonds at Book Value 33,019.92 



December 31, 1952 




Cash in Banks 


$13,405.62 


Real Estate Mortgages 


33,575.00 


Bond at Book Value 


30,019.38 


INCOME ACCOUNT 


January 1, 1952 Cash on Hand 


$ 7,827.19 


Interest and 




Dividends Rec'd 


2,480.21 



Expenditures 

Safe Deposit Box $ 12.00 

Treasurer's Bond 25.00 

E. E. Hammond - Salary 200.00 

Expenditures for Punchard 
Library, Commercial Dept., 
Manual Training Dept., 
etc. 3,088.29 

December 31, 1952 Cash on Hand 6,982.11 






$77,000.00 



$77,000.00 



$10,307.40 



$10,307.40 



GOLDSMITH FUND 

Jan. 1, 1952 Cash in Savings Bank $ 342.06 
Interest Received 8.16 



Dec. 31, 1952 Cash in Savings Bank $ 350.22 

90 



DRAPER FUND 

Jan. 1, 1952 Cash in Savings Bank $1,506.66 
Interest Received 35.60 



$1,542.26 
Scholarship Awarded 30.00 



Dec. 31, 1952 Cash in Savings Bank $1,512.26 

BARNARD FUND 

Jan. 1, 1952 Cash in Savings Bank $ 28.89 
Dividends Received 40.00 

Interest Received .43 



$69.32 
Prizes Awarded 40.00 



Dec. 31, 1952 Cash in Savings Bank $ 29.32 

CHAPIN FUND 

Jan. 1, 1952 Cash in Savings Bank $2,237.04 
Interest Received 52.95 



$2,289.99 
Scholarship Awarded 40.00 

Dec. 31, 1952 Cash in Savings Bank $2,249.99 

RESERVE FUND 
Jan. 1, 1952 Cash in Savings Bank $3,811.21 
Interest Received 91.05 



$3,902.26 
Adjustment .54 

Dec. 31, 1952 Cash in Savings Bank $3,901.72 

HENRY WARREN BARNARD AND MABEL PARADISE 

BARNARD FUND 
Jan. 1, 1952 Cash in Savings Bank $1,041.48 
Interest Received 23.95 



$1,065.43 
Expenditures 38.60 

Dec. 31, 1952 Cash in Savings Bank $1,026.83 

01 



ELIZABETH T. GUTTERSON SCHOLARSHIP 

Jan. 1, 1952 Cash is Savings Bank $1,027.05 
Interest Received 24.28 



$1,051.33 
Scholarship Awarded 20.00 



Dec. 31, 1952 Cash in Savings Bank $1,031.33 

M. E. GUTTERSON BOTANY PRIZES 

Jan. 1, 1952 Cash in Savings Bank $ 311.30 
Interest Received $ 7.36 



$318.66 
Prizes Awarded 5.00 



Dec. 31, 1952 Cash in Savings Bank $ 313.66 

ALICE M. BELL FUND 

Jan. 1, 1952 Cash in Savings Bank $989.80 

Interest Received 23.63 



Dec. 31, 1952 Cash in Savings Bank $1,013.43 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edmond E. Hammond 

Treasurer 



This is to certify that the securities belonging to the 
Trustees of Punchard Free School and the income accruing 
therefrom have been checked and found to be correct. 

The remaining items in the above account are examined 
by the Town Accountant. 

C. C. Kimball 
Roy E. Hardy 
Harry Sellars 

92 



Report of 
Trustees of Memorial Hall Library 



Cash January 1, 1952 


$. 708.96 


Income from Investments 


2,411.00 


Income from Savings Bank Accounts 


185.39 


Income from Contributions, Redemptions 




or Additions to Principal 


405.95 


Total Cash and Income 


$3,711.30 


Paid Town of Andover 


$2,750.00 


Safe Deposit Box Rental 


12.50 


Purchase of Audio Visual Materials 


402.16 


Total Disbursements 


$3,164.66 


Balance December 31, 1952 


$ 546.64 


LEOF. 


Daley 




Treasurer 



93 



JOHN CORNELL WOOD AND COAL FUND 

Principal Fund. 

Andover Savings Bank, Andover #13259 $1,000.00 

Essex Savings Bank, Lawrence #82865 $1,000.00 

Broadway Savings, Lawrence #13403 $1,000.00 

City Inst, of Savings, Lowell #69782 $1,000,00 

The Central Savings, Lowell #21760 $1,000.00 



$5,000.00 



Receipts 

Balance on hand January 1st, 1952 $ 723.17 

Interest received during 1952 120.00 



$ 843.17 



Expenditures 

October 15, 1952 Cross Coal Co. $ 27.00 
Nov. 3, 1953 Cross Coal Co. 28.20 



55.20 Less 55.20 



Balance on hand January 1st, 1953 $ 787.97 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edward P. Hall, Chairman 
Fred E. Cheever, Treasurer 
Arthur W. Cole 



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103 



Town Debt 

DETAIL OF PAYMENT BY YEARS 







Junior High 


Elementary 






Sewer 


School 


Schools 




Year 


Rate 4%% 


2&214% 


1%% 


Total 


1953 


$5,000. 


$19,000. 


$55,000. 


$79,000. 


1954 




4,000. 


55,000. 


59,000. 


1955 




4,000. 


55,000. 


59,000. 


1956 






55,000. 


55,000. 


1957 






55,000. 


55,000. 


1958 






55,000. 


55.000. 


1959 






55,000. 


55,000. 


1960 






55,000. 


55,000. 


1961 






55,000. 


55,000. 


1962 






50,000. 


50,000. 


1963 






50,000. 


50,000. 


1964 






50,000. 


50,000. 


1965 






50,000. 


50,000. 


1966 






50,000. 


50.000. 


Totals 


$5,000. 


$27,000. 


$745,000. 


$777,000. 



104 



Board of Retirement Report 



To the Board of Selectmen, 
Andover, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

The Town of Andover Board of Retirement herewith sub- 
mits the following report for the year 1952 : 



Cash on Hand, January 1, 1952 




$ 3,882.94 


Receipts : 






Deductions, Groups I and II 


$21,082.03 




Appropriation 


21,934.26 




Bonds Matured 


9,000.00 




Interest on Bonds and Stocks 


6,727.48 


$58,743.77 



Expenditures : 

Pensions Paid Groups 1 and II $26,623.82 

Investments 28,101.00 

Accrued Interest on Investments 153.43 

Refunds, Deductions and Interest 1,463.19 

Office Expenses: 

• Clerical Assistance $ 1,325.20 

Office Supplies, Postage, Etc. 211.37 



$ 1,536.57 



$57,878.01 

Cash on Hand, January 1, 1953 $ 4,748.70 

Statement of Assets and Liabilities 
Assets 
Deposits not on interest : 

Andover National Bank $ 4,748.70 

Deposits on interest : 

First National Bank, Boston 8,930.00 

Merchants National Bank, Boston 7,375.00 

105 



Government Bonds 115,429.44 

Railroad Bonds 42,388.06 

Telephone Bonds 21,779.05 

Public Utility Bonds 33,067.16 



$233,717.11 

Liabilities 

Annuity Savings Fund $151,922.49 

Special Fund for Military Service Credit 2,063.89 

Annuity Reserve Fund 21,636.17 

Pension Fund 56,672.78 

Expense Fund 17.81 

Interest due and accrued December 31, 1952 1,404.27 



$233,717.41 



The required appropriation by the Town for 1953 for the 
Pension Fund as certified by the Insurance Department of 
the Commonwealth is $21,330.00. 

During the year three members have retired and four 
have left the employ of the Town. Two pensioners have died. 

On December 31, 1952 there were one hundred and thirty 
four active members of the system and twenty six on retire- 
ment. 



Respectfully submitted, 

George C. Napier, Chairman 
David L. Nicoll, Secretary 
Edmond E. Hammond 

Board of Retirement 



106 



Treasurer's Report 



Receipts and payments for the year were as follows : 

Balance, January 1, 1952 $ 800,563.69 

Receipts 1,752,063.23 



$2,552,626.92 
Payments 2,042,515.26 



Balance, December 31, 1952 $ 510,111.66 

Of this balance, $31,875.50 is in the elementary schools 
building account. 

Disbursements were in accordance with 108 Selectmen's 
warrants and over 18,000 checks were issued. Included in 
the totals above is $92,317.57 for federal taxes withheld 
from the pay of over 300 full and part-time employees. 
Payroll deductions for the purchase of U.S. Savings Bonds 
amounted to $4,860.63 and $9,012.36 for Blue Cross - Blue 
Shield dues. 

Cemetery perpetual care and other trust funds, as well 
as the funds of the Retirement Board, all in the treasurer's 
custody, are listed on other pages of this report. The num- 
ber of pensioners again increased by one to 26 and the 
average monthly pension to $90.00. 

Tax titles number 20 and amount to $1,489.60. 

The normal growth of the department, plus the opening 
of 2 new school cafeterias, warrant more than the 2 days a 
week of clerical help available at present. Thanks are due to 
Lida A. Colquhoun for counting the parking meter money, 
to Sarah E. Wiss for recording earnings & deductions, and 
to John E. Gilcreast, Assistant Treasurer, for service in the 
summer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thaxter Eaton, Treasurer 

107 



Report of Tax Collector 



POLL TAXES 




Year Collected Abated] 


Outstanding 


1952 1952 


Jan. 1, 1953 


1951 $ 16.00 $ 32.00 




1952 7,042.00 *$ 1,428.00 


$ 28.00 


*Of this amount: 





Abatements to Men over 65 years $932.00 
Abatements to Men in Armed Services $294.00 



PERSONAL TAXES 



Year 


Collected Abated] 


Outstanding 




1952 1952 


Jan. 1, 1953 


1949 


$ 171.65 $ 




1950 


938.11 


$ 164.70 


1951 


4,007.69 $ 36.00 


1,902.58 


1952 


106,013.91 293.70 
REAL ESTATE TAXES 


6,429.06 


Year 


Collected Abated] 


Outstanding 




1952 1952 


Jan. 1, 1953 


1949 


$ 19.08 




1950 


3,692.78 $ 575.05 


$ 9.00 


1951 


30,943.37 284.30 


6,368.67 


1952 


764,904.75 10,724.63 
MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE 


44,183.02 


Year 


Collected Abated) 


Outstanding 




1952 1952 


Jan. 1, 1953 


1949 


$ .68 $ 46.32 




1950 


66.19 56.58 




1951 


8,411.09 382.28 


$ 1,032.71 


1952 


103,546.80 6,871.65 

108 


6,627.47 



MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTIONS 

Water Liens $ 3,274.28 

Sewer Assessments (apportioned) Paid in advance 1,710.91 

Sewer Assessments (apportioned) 1,614.53 

Sewer Assessments (unapportioned) 1,805.05 

Committed Interest on Sewer Assessments 486.45 

Classified Forest Land Tax 8.92 

Interest on Delinquent Taxes 1,747.29 

Estate of Deceased Persons 1,363.57 



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Assessors' Report 



We herewith submit our annual report : — 
Number of polls assessed 4,209 

Number of persons assessed 4,231 

(real and personal) 
Valuation — personal property $2,551,047.00 
Valuation— real estate 18,580,230.00 





$21,131,277.00 


Tax on polls $ 


8,418.00 


Tax on personal property 


112,246.07 


Tax on real estate 


817,530.12 




938 194 19 




t/ t_J (J , J. %J ^ . -L xJ 


Apportioned Sewer 


1,675.57 


Committed interest 


521.25 


Water liens added to taxes 


1,570.57 


Abatements : — 




Poll taxes 


1,460.00 


Personal property 


329.70 


Real estate 


11,583.98 


1948 Unapportioned Sewer 




added to taxes 


24.08 


Rate of taxation per $1,000. - $44.00 


Number of assessed : — 




Horses 


54 


Cows 


370 


Yearlings, bulls, and heifers 


177 


Swine 


274 


Sheep 


109 


Fowl 


34,362 


All other 


418 


Number of acres assessed + 


16,854 + 


Number of dwelling houses assessed 3,353 


Motor Vehicle and 


Trailer Excise 


Number of vehicles assessed 


5,820 


Assessed valuation $2,913,395.00 


Excise 


117,659.84 


Abatements 


7,356.83 


Rate $48.25 




ill 





Additional Assessments 
Number of polls assessed 32 

Number of persons assessed 

real and personal 35 

Valuation — personal property $ 10,700.00 
Valuation— real estate 23,350.00 

Tax on polls 64.00 

Tax on personal property 470.80 

Tax on real estate - 1,027.40 

Number of acres assessed 5+ 

Respectfully submitted, 

Roy E. Hardy, Chairman 
J. Everett Collins 
Sidney P. White 
MUNICIPAL PROPERTIES AND PUBLIC 
IMPROVEMENTS 





Land and 


Equip, and 


Total 




Buildings 


other prop. 


Town Hall 


$ 115,900 


$ 15,150 


$ 131,050 


Shaw Property 


12,000 




12,000 


Fire Department 


92,175 


60,000 


152,175 


Police Department 


600 


4,000 


4,600 


Schools 


2,754,750 


82,000 


2,836,750 


Library- 


• 212,000 


40,000 


252,000 


Water Department 


139,000 


1,306,529 


1,445,529 


Sewer Department 


2,600 


630,354 


632,954 


Highway Department 


26,200 


71,000 


97,200 


Parks and Playgrounds 


68,975 


6,200 


75,175 


Tree Warden and Moth Department 




10,000 


10,000 


Infirmary 


80,300 


2,500 


82,800 


Spring Grove Cemetery 


36,350 


1,125 


37,475 


Weights and Measures 




350 


350 


Town Scales 




500 


500 


Old Schoolhouses 


47,750 




47,750 


Punchard School Fund 




84,807 


84,807 


Memorial Hall Investment Funds 




93,218 


93,218 


Pomps Pond Bathing Beach 


7,050 


300 


7,350 


Beacon & Lowell Sts. — land 


1,000 




1,000 


Burnham Road — land 


2,500 




2,500 


Indian Ridge — land 


1,000 




1,000 


Woodland — West District 


275 




275 


Carmel Woods — land 


12,000 




12,000 


Main and Dwight Sts. — land 


5,000 




5,000 


Public Dump Site 


6,000 




6,000 


Tax Title Possessions 


2,225 




2,225 


Totals 


$3,625,650 


$2,408,033 


$6,033,683 



112 



Board of Public Welfare 



The Board of Public Welfare submits the following re- 
port for the year 1952. 

We added 33 cases to our Old Age Assistance rolls during 
the year 1952 and dropped 37 through death and other 
causes. There were 42 applications for this form of aid, and 
of these, 9 were found to be ineligible. When the year 1952 
began we had 179 cases, and at the close of the year we were 
aiding 175. During 1952, we filed liens with the Registry of 
Deeds on all real estate owned by recipients as of January 
first, 1952, and in all cases which have been added since 
that time, where there is ownership of real estate. Several 
people have sold their property during the year, and we 
have collected $4844.04 for previous aid rendered. We be- 
lieve this new law to be very fair, and an effective way of re- 
covering aid granted to a person who leaves an estate. 

Our Aid to Dependent Children form of assistance has re- 
mained about the same during 1952. At the start of the year 
we were aiding 15 cases, and at the close we had 14 cases on 
our pay roll. 

Under General Relief, we have shown a reduction in case 
load and cost, due to the new form of aid called Disability 
Assistance. The total cost of General Relief for 1951 was 
$18,929.17, while this year it was reduced to $8833.69. 

Disability Assistance is a program of assistance for needy 
persons found to be permanently and totally disabled. Sev- 
enty-five per cent of the cost of the program is borne by the 
Federal and State Governments, and all the cases aided have 
been transferred from our General Relief Program where 
there is no Federal or State contribution. We are aiding six 
individuals on this program. 

113 



At this time, we wish to thank all citizens and private or- 
ganizations who have assisted our department and ' con- 
tributed to the welfare of our citizens. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Roy E. Hardy, Chairman 
J. Everett Collins 
Sidney P. White 
Arthur W. Cole, Welfare Agent 



114 



Report of Trustees of Spring Grove 

Cemetery 






The Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery submit their an- 
nual report for the year 1952. 

There were eighty interments during the year. Twenty- 
one new lots were sold which are all under perpetual care. 

The amount of perpetual care for lots sold during the year 
was $4,308.00 dollars. Six old lots were placed under perpe- 
tual care totalling $1,035.00 dollars. 

The income from perpetual care funds for the year 
amounted to $2,455.39 dollars. Monies received from an- 
nual care, sale of lots, foundations interments, etc., amount- 
ed to $5,604.40. There were 29 foundations set during the 
year. 

Three hundred and fifty feet of permanent hard black top 
road was constructed on the East side of the cemetery. 

Eighty feet of curbing was installed on the West side of 
the cemetery. 

Three hundred feet of the stone wall bordering Abbot St. 
has been recapped. 

Trees and shrubery have had their annual prunning and 
trimming. 

The Trustees are cooperating with the Board of Public 
Works making available our equipment and men during 
snow storms. 

An article has been inserted in the Town Warrant asking 
for an approriation of $450.00 for a new rotary power lawn 
mower to replace the 16 year old one which is beyond repair. 

Frank R. Petty, Chairman 
Fred E. Cheever, Secretary 
Albert E. Curtis 
Malcolm E. Lundgren 
William D. McIntyre 
Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery 
115 



Office of Veterans' Service 



The ninth annual report on Veterans' Services and Reha- 
bilitation finds us repeating the duties of the years imme- 
diately following World War II. Each week, veterans are re- 
turning home from service eager to start civilian life again. 
Just as the veterans of the recent war had opportunities for 
education, job training, home and business loans, and gra- 
tuities such as unemployment compensation, insurance, mus- 
tering-out pay, combat pay, and many other benefits, so, too, 
do the Veterans of the Korean Campaign. 

The rotation of troops has been in full stride since last 
June and will continue to increase our veteran population 
until the Korean trouble comes to an end. The majority of 
the new veterans are much younger than those of World 
War II and have very definite ideas as to what they wish to 
do. Many plan to continue school or take up job-training. 

Our estimated veteran population in Andover, including 
participants in all wars to date, should reach Twenty-three 
hundred during the year 1953. Many veteran laws are ex- 
tended to the wives, children, and dependent parents of 
veterans, providing they are in need, so our potential service 
embraces a large percentage of our fellow townsmen. 

Despite the local textile slump and job shortage in this vi- 
cinity, the demand for monetary assistance has not been too 
heavy at any one time this past year. We have had, how- 
ever, a steady drain on our budget from our permanent 
cases which tend to increase yearly and include, for the 
most part, widows. Hospital and medical care through State 
Veterans' Benefits have been average, but requests for simi- 
lar care through the Federal Veterans Administration have 
shown an increase. 

Photostating of discharge papers will increase this year as 
the veterans are required to present these copies when filing 
for benefits. 

The State Legislators are contemplating a State Bonus 
for the new veterans similar to that granted World War II 
veterans. We expect this to be passed in 1953. 

116 



The number of conferences involving paper work during 
the year was 2,054. The main categories covered were: 
medical cases 171 ; pension applications 154 ; photostats 177 ; 
hospitalization 98; education 69; employment 120; insur- 
ance 89; housing 61. The remaining cases cover 27 other 
different categories. 

During the year 1952, 20 veterans died — 12 World War 
I ; 4 World War II ; 2 Korean Campaign ; 1 Spanish War ; and 
1 Peacetime Veteran. 

, We wish to express our sincere thanks and appreciation to 
all members of the local veteran organizations for their loy- 
al and reverent respect to our deceased veterans throughout 
the year. They have responded to all requests made by the 
next-of-kin at time of burial. 

The co-operation of all veteran organizations and their 
ever willing spirit to work along with us is most gratifying 
and we are deeply grateful to them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Roy E. Hardy, Chairman, Board of Selectmen 
J. Everett Collins 
Sidney P. White 

Francis P. Markey, Agent 
Office of Veterans Service 



117 



Fourth Annual Report of the Andover 
Housing Authority 



Nineteen hundred and fifty-two was the second full year 
of occupancy of the Andover Housing Project. 

Two new members were appointed to the Andover Hous-, 
ing Authority in 1952. Garrett J. Burke was appointed by 
the State Housing Board to the Authority and Thomas R. 
Wallace was appointed by the Board of Selectmen to fill the 
unexpired term of Ernest N. Hall. Ernest N. Hall was 
Chairman of the Authority in 1952, but on October 1, Mr. 
Hall resigned from the Authority. The Authority then 
elected Mr. Hall Executive Director, which position he has 
been filling since that date. 

There was a turnover of about fifteen families in the Pro- 
ject in the year 1952. Most of the families leaving the Pro- 
ject bought or built homes of their own. The Authority has 
only a few applications for housing on file and it is suggested 
that any veterans desiring accommodations in the Project 
file their application at the Authority office on Morton Street. 

Continued study of the heating problem at the Project 
resulted in the installation of storm windows on all corner 
apartments in the Project and the outside weather controls 
were adjusted to furnish heat during the night. Plans are 
now being made to increase the parking area in the Project 
in an effort to accommodate one car for each apartment in 
the Project. 

James E. Manning, the manager of the Project, is doing 
an excellent job and has received splendid cooperation from 
the tenants in the Project. 

Winthrop Newcomb, the Chairman of the Authority, is 
not seeking reelection to the Authority at the Town election 
in March of 1953, and will, therefore, retire from the Ando- 

118 



ver Housing Authority. Mr. Newcomb has been a member 
of the Authority since it was set up by the Town in 1948, and 
during that time Mr. Newcomb has rendered invaluable 
service to the Authority. He has served as Treasurer and 
Chairman during his years on the Authority and he will be 
missed by the remaining members of the Board. The Town 
of Andover is indeed indebted to Mr. Newcomb for the time 
and effort he has put into his work as a member of the Au- 
thority. 

The payment to the Town of Andover in lieu of taxes for 
the year 1952 was $1249.07. 

The members of the Andover Housing Authority as of 
December 31, 1952 are Winthrop Newcomb, Chairman; 
Franklin Haggerty, V ice-Chairman; Thomas R. Wallace, 
Treasurer; Charles G. Hatch, Secretary; Garrett J. Burke, 
Assistant Treasurer. 

A balance sheet and statement of operations for the nine 
months period ending December 31st, 1952 is attached. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles G. Hatch, Secretary 



119 



BALANCE SHEET 



December 21, 1952 

ASSETS 

Cash — Andover National Bank 

Administration Fund $15,192.02 

Security Deposit Fund 534.00 

Accounts Receivable — Tenants 
De*bt Service Fund 
Debt Service Trust Fund 
Investment Debt Service Trust Fund 
Development Costs 

Total 



$ 



15,726.02 

188.50 

16,549.18 

939.05 

1,000.00 

626,000.00 



$660,402.75 



LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL 



Income Tax Withholding 




2.60 


Pension Fund Deduction 




13.00 


Accrued Liabilities 






Insurance 


$ 1,983.00 




Payments in lieu of taxes 


1,340.12 




Matured interest and principal 


17,476.89 


20,800.01 


Undistributed Credits 






Tenants Security Deposits 


534.00 




Tenants Prepaid Rent 


115.50 


649.50 


Fixed Liabilities 






Bonds Authorized & Issued 




626,000.00 


Reserves 






Debt Service 


1,493.21 




Unamortized Bond Premium 


1,931.35 




Operating Reserve 


4,186.19 


7,610.75 



Surplus 



$655,075.86 
5,326.89 

$660,402.75 



120 



Statement of Operations for Nine Months Ended 



December 31, 1952 


come 
Rents 


$27,683.75 


Less - Vacancy Loss 


148.83 


Net Rental 


$27,534.92 


vpenses 

Management Expenses 


$ 1,642.58 


Operating Services 


819.95 


Utilities 


7,893.12 


Repairs, Maint. & Replacements 


2,470.66 


Insurance 


771.61 


Payments in Lieu of Taxes 


1,014.74 


Provision for Operating Reserve 


2,520.00 



Provision for Debt Service Reserve 1,493.21 
Debt Service Requirements 17,195.51 

Operating Improvements 2,036.65 

Total Expense 37,858.03 



Net Deficit from Operations 

For Nine Months Period 10,323.11 

Contribution from State - Twelve Months Period 15,650.00 



Surplus $ 5,326.89 



121 



Board of Appeals Report 



To the Board of Selectmen : 

The Board of Appeals under the Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Andover has the following members: James S. 
Eastham, Chairman, term expiring May 1, 1955; Roy E. 
Hardy, Secretary, term expiring May 1, 1953; Edward P. 
Hall, term expiring May 1, 1954; and two associate mem- 
bers, Leon A. Field and Walter C. Tomlinson, terms expiring 
May 1, 1953. 

During the year 1952, the seventeenth year of the Zoning 
By-Law, the Board decided nineteen cases as follows: 

Petition of Carolyn F. Jordan and Helen M. Jordan, de- 
cided on January 21, 1952, for permission to build a house 
on land situated on the easterly side of Pasho Street with 
side yards of less than fifteen feet. Granted 

Petition of Norman R. Morgan and Nada B. Morgan, 
decided on February 25, 1952, for permission to maintain a 
roadside stand on the north side of Lowell Street for the 
purpose of selling poultry and eggs and other farm products. 

Granted 

Petition of Maude B. D. Killam, decided on February 25, 
1952, for permission to convert a one-family house owned 
by her on the north side of Porter Road into a two-family 
house. Granted 

Petition of Eugene Jordan and Helen Jordan, decided on 
April 7, 1952, for a variance from the Zoning By-Law to 
permit the continuance of the location of a house owned by 
them at 98 Burnham Road with a frontage of less than 75 
feet on said Road. Granted 

Petition of John E. Myatt, decided on June 23, 1952, for 
a variance from the Zoning By-Law to permit the continu- 
ance of the location of a house owned by him at 219 High- 
land Road on a lot with a frontage of less than 75 feet and 
with a side yard on the north of only two feet. Granted 

122 



Petition of John E. Myatt, William J. Myatt, and Mary 
Lavang, decided on June 23, 1952, for a variance from the 
Zoning By-Law to permit the continuance of the location of 
a house owned by them as the heirs of Norman P. Myatt at 
221 Highland Road on a lot with a frontage of less than 75 
feet and with a side yard on the south of only 10 feet. 

Granted 

Petition of Giocchino J. Cavallaro and Concetta Cavallaro, 
decided on July 2, 1952, for permission to erect and maintain 
a roadside stand on property owned by them on the east side 
of South Main Street for the purpose of selling poultry and 
eggs. Denied 

Petition of Emil Sigouin and Lucinda Sigouin, decided on 
July 2, 1952, for permission to construct and operate a 
building to be used as a sanitarium and convalescent home 
in the rear of property owned by them at 10 Argilla Road. 

Denied 

Request of Oscar R. Hoehn, granted on July 2, 1952, for 
approval of the subdivision into three lots of the property 
owned by him at 53-55-57 High Street in accordance with 
the provisions of decision of the Board of May 26, 1947, 
giving permission to erect a four-apartment house on the 
property. Granted 

Petition of Donald B. Look, decided on August 6, 1952, for 
permission to convert a one-family house owned by him 
and other heirs of Dr. Percy J. Look at 115 Main Street into 
a four-apartment house. Granted 

Petition of Giocchino J. Cavallaro and Concetta Cavallaro, 
decided on August 6, 1952, for permission to erect and main- 
tain a roadside stand on property owned by them on the 
east side of South Main Street for the sale of poultry and 
eggs produced on the property and farm produce raised 
thereon. Granted 

Petition of Esther W. Smith, decided on August 6, 1952, 
for permission to subdivide land owned by her on the north 
side of Shawsheen Road. Granted 

123 



Petition of Charles and Ellen Danna, decided on August 6 
1952, for a variance from the Zoning By-Law for permission 
to operate a dog kennel on the By-Pass. Denied 

Petition of Raymond L. Furneaux, Frances A. Furneaux 
and Rita F. Furneaux, decided on October 6, 1952, for per- 
mission to sell antiques on property owned by them on the 
north side of Lowell Street. Denied 

Petition of the Trustees of Phillips Academy, decided on 
October 10, 1952, for permission to subdivide property 
owned by it on the southeast side of Woodland Road. 

Granted 

Petition of Albert A. Rooney and Agnes E. Rooney, de- 
cided on October 14, 1952, for permission to construct and 
maintain a house on property owned by them on the east 
side of North Main Street near Balmoral Street, with side 
yards of less than 15 feet. Granted 

Petition of M. T. Stevens and Sons Company, decided on 
November 24, 1952, for permission to subdivide property 
owned by it on North Main, Stevens, and Cassimere Streets 
resulting in frontages, side yards, areas, and rear yards in 
numerous instances which are less than the requirements of 
the Zoning By-Law. Granted 

Petition of W. R. Hill, decided on December 29, 1952, for 
permission to convert a one-family house owned by him at 
23 Central Street into a two-apartment house. Granted 

Petition of Marguerite L. Botsch, decided on December 29, 
1952, for permission to convert a one-family house owned by 
her at 8 Dumbarton Street into a two-apartment house. 

Denied 

Respectfully submitted, 

James S. Eastham, Chairman 
Roy E. Hardy, Secretary 
Edward P. Hall 



124 



Report of Planning Board and Board 
of Survey 



The following Public Hearings were held by the Planning 
Board during the year 1952 : 

Feb. 8 — There were five hearings on this date as follows : 

1 — Relative to a proposed amendment to the Town 
Zoning By-Law changing the zoning from a single 
Residence District to a Business District a parcel of land on 
Main Street, known as the "Shaw Estate" and owned by the 
Town of Andover. 

The Board voted in favor with limitations reserving a 
strip of land of at least 50 feet on the west side. 

2 — Concerning a re-zoning of the properties at #9 and 
#13 Chestnut Street by changing to a Business District 
from a single Residence District. 

The owner at 9 Chestnut Street withdrew his petition. 
The Board is opposed to the change requested at #13 Chest- 
nut Street for following reasons: (1) no need of a change 
was presented; (2) the neighborhood has desirable resi- 
dential property which would be adversely affected; (3) 
expansion of business district to include this one property 
would not serve any existing need or be good planning. 

3 — Proposal to amend the Town Zoning By-Law in refer- 
ence to the removal of earth, etc. 

The Board is not in favor of this amendment. It is of the 
opinion that this matter requires further study and that the 
wording of the amendment would result in confusion as to 
the operation of the existing gravel pits. 

4 — Relative to a proposal to amend the Zoning By-Law by 
altering the wording in Section 4 of Section XII for a two- 
family or apartment house. 

The Board is in favor of the amendment and suggests the 
following wording: "4. Permit conversion of a one-family 
or a two or more family house if existing at the time this 
By-Law is adopted into a two-family or apartment house." 

125 



5 — A proposed amendment to the Town Zoning By-Law : 
Any structure for living quarters hereafter erected to have 
a first floor area of at least 400 square feet. 

The Board is in favor of this amendment because it is de- 
sirable from a health standpoint and would serve to prohibit 
home trailers which the Board regards as detrimental to the 
best interests of the Town. 

February 15 — Petition relative to a proposed amendment 
to the Zoning By-Law concerning a change from a Residen- 
tial to a Business District the property known as the "Duck 
Inn" on Lowell Street. 

The Board is opposed to this amendment. The adjacent 
properties are residential and would be adversely affected 
by the change requested. Public convenience does not re- 
quire the change and the majority of neighboring owners 
are in opposition. Further the proposed change would be 
spot zoning and therefore illegal. 

A proposal to amend the Zoning By-Law by re-zoning 
from Single Residential to a Business District a parcel of 
land located between 291 and 295 North Main Street. 

After consideration on all factors the Board is opposed to 
the proposed change. Highly desirable residential properties 
abut this property. There appears to be no public need of 
expanding the Business District to encompass this area. 

February 20 — A proposed amendment to the Zoning By- 
Law concerning a change from a Residential to a Business 
District of property located at the corner of Poor and Lowell 
Streets on Petition of Mr. Donald McNeil. 

By a majority vote the Board is opposed to this re-zoning 
for the following reasons : 

(1) The surrounding properties would suffer in prop- 

erty values. 

(2) Enlargement of the commercial use would con- 

tribute to the existing traffic hazard. 

(3) Dangers to the many children in the vicinity from 

school and Hussey's Pond both in winter and 
summer. 

126 



(4) The proposed change would further adversely af- 
fect the parking facilities in the immediate 
vicinity. 

April 4 — For approval of a plan of land located east of 
Virginia Road for the purpose of subdivision and opening 
for public use on petition of Carl H. Stevens. This plan was 
approved. 

June 13 — 1 A petition by Karl Killorin for approval of 
a plan on Porter Road for purpose of subdivision and open- 
ing for public use. 

2 — Request for approval of a plan of land for purpose 
of subdivision and opening for public use a way known as 
Judson Road. 

3 — A petition for approval of a plan of land at the junc- 
tion of Lowell Street and Bellevue Road for purpose of sub- 
division only. 

All three foregoing plans were approved. 

July 7 — A request for approval of a plan of land on the 
southerly side of Lowell Street formerly part of the Ward 
Estate for the purpose of subdivision and opening for public 
use. 

Approval was withheld until the petitioner Mr. T. Grasso 
furnished a bond in the amount of $10,000.00 to cover the 
cost of constructing necessary drainage from Lincoln Street 
through the property. Mr. Grasso later constructed this 
drainage system and the plan was approved forthwith. 

October 20 — Petitioner Fred Smith requested approval of 
a plan of land east of Highland Road and Adjacent to High- 
land Avenue for purpose of subdivision and opening for pub- 
lic use. 

A modified plan eliminating certain lots not adjacent to 
the proposed way was approved. 

December 8 — George F. Dufton requested approval of a 
plan of land located at the junction of Shawsheen Road and 
Stevens Street for the purpose of subdivision and opening 
for public use a private way known as "Beech Circle". 

This plan was approved. 

127 



December 22 — M. T. Stevens Company requested approval 
of a plan of land located off Stevens Street for the purpose 
of subdivision and opening for public use a private way 
known as "Cassimere Street". 

This plan was approved. 

A petition was made for approval of a plan of land lo- 
cated between Walnut Avenue and Elm Street for the pur- 
pose of opening for public use a private way known as 
"Lockway Road". 

It was the unanimous decision of the Board that the fore- 
going street layout should not be approved until steps are 
taken to put the road in proper condition and arrange for 
proper drainage. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter C. Tomlinson, Chairman 
Leon A. Field, Secretary 
Frederick E. Cheever 
Kirk R. Batcheller 
Richard C. Simmers 

Edward R. Lawson, Clerk 



128 



Report of Recreation Committee 



The Andover Recreation Committee submits the following 
annual report for the year 1952 : 

Summer Activities 
Five playgrounds were operated during the past season 
with a personnel of fourteen instructors and one supervisor. 
Handicraft work, which was carried on a reduced scale the 
past few years, was extensively reactivated this year due 
to the fact that we had two excellent instructors in this art. 
We hope to enlarge upon this field of recreation which is one 
of the most beneficial and noteworthy in our program. The 
usual Field Days, Twilight Baseball League, and Annual 
Picnic were carried as in the past. For the first time in three 
years Central Playground will be located in the regular spot 
on the Central School grounds and not in the make-shift 
location in the Park. West Center Playground will be moved 
to the new West Center Elementary School Grounds. 

Pomps Pond 
Personnel consisted of a supervisor, matron and five life 
guards. The hot dry summer increased the attendance at the 
beach and the number of children and adults enjoying this 
form of recreation was far above the average. This year, an 
extensive Water Safety and Life Saving Program will be in- 
augurated. The pond will be under our supervision for ten 
weeks. A complete Red Cross Water Program will be carried 
on taking in children from the age of five and up and in- 
cluding adults. We hope to see large classes in the age five 
group as Beginners and also in the Swimmer, Intermediate 
and Advanced classes, leading up to Junior and Senior Life 
Saving instruction. These Life Saving classes will be held 
for any adults who wish to learn or have a refresher course 
in the new swimming and life saving methods. The oppor- 
tunity is provided for everybody to enjoy the recreational 
features at Pomps Pond and at the same time learn to swim 
and possibly save a life some day. 

129 



Winter Activities 

We had only one skating area in Ballardvale this past 
season, as Central was closed because of the Central School 
construction. This year both areas will be in use and kept 
in condition during the skating season. This means plowing 
and proper spraying. 

Easter and Halloween Parties 

The Annual Easter Egg Hunt was held on Easter Sat- 
urday with approximately 1200 children participating with 
their parents witnessing the spectacle of seeing 14,000 pieces 
of candy scooped up in less than one minute. 

Halloween Parties were held in Ballardvale, West Center, 
North District with two at Central. Those under Junior 
High School age celebrated in the Memorial Auditorium and 
the Junior and Punchard School students enjoyed their fun 
in the new Elementary School gymnasium. The Recretaion 
Committee provided ice cream, candy, cookies and tonics for 
1,600 children. Half of the expenditures were met by gener- 
ous contributions from the following organizations : Ameri- 
can Legion Post No. 8 and the Ladies Auxiliary ; all Women's 
Post of the American Legion ; V.F.W. Post No. 2127 and the 
Auxiliary; Police and Firemen's Relief Associations; And- 
over Service Club; Andover Youth Center; Andovver Boost- 
ers Club ; Andover Teachers Association ; Andover PTA-Stu- 
dent, Andover Elementary, and Shawsheen PTA Associa- 
tions; St. Augustine's School Guild, and Miss Carmelina 
Cristaldi. 

Pending Improvements to Grounds 

This year we are sponsoring a special article in the 
Town Warrant for $600.00 to be spent in conjunction with 
the special appropriation of $2,300.00 approved at the 1950 
Town Meeting to improve and resurface a portion of Central 
Playground for year round recreational purposes. This will 
be a hot top job in an area 74 x 180 feet for skating in the 
winter and other activities in the summer. We also hope to 
install a few lights at both skating areas so that adults may 
enjoy skating in the evening. 

130 



Acknowledgments 

To all organizations — veteran, civil and social — 
whose generosity and cooperation did so much to make our 
year successful, we extend our sincere thanks and apprecia- 
tion. 

Stafford A. Lindsay, Chairman 
Francis P. Markey, Secretary 
Alan F. Dunlop 
George A. Stanley, Jr. 
Alco E. Taylor 



131 



Report of The Special Committee 
On Water and Sewerage 



This committee, appointed at the annual Town Meeting 
of March 1941, submits the following as its report for the 
year 1952. 

Water 

The completion of the new water line from Phillips 
Street to Bancroft Road during the past year brings to com- 
pletion practically all of the major improvements recom- 
mended for the Low Service System by your Committee in 
its 1945 report. The new pump at Haggetts Pond together 
with the four miles of 16" pipe installed in the past seven 
years proved capable of meeting the extremely heavy draft 
during the greatest demand of last summer. 

The lining of the force main from the High Service Pump- 
ing Station to the High Service Reservoir has enabled the 
new pumps at Bancroft Road to maintain a reasonably sat- 
isfactory level in the reservoir. The capacity of this reser- 
voir, however, is only a little over half a million gallons, and 
this is definitely insufficient for the constantly increasing 
demand on our High Service System. Your Committee has 
several times reported that the distribution lines in this sys- 
tem are inadequate, and the continual increase in building 
and demand makes this steadily more significant. No ex- 
penditure is recommended now, but the Town should keep 
in mind the inevitable expense to be met in the future. 

The total annual use of water by the Town is rapidly ap- 
proaching the quantity available from Haggetts Pond. In 
our 1945 report, it was stated that the safe yield was about 
11/3 million gallons per day under dry weather conditions, 
and not over 1.85 millions per day with normal rain. Our 
present demand must be considered as at least 1.5 millions 
per day and we are definitely approaching the limit of safe 
yield. The Board of Public Works has spent money wisely 
in cleaning the edges of the pond, but this will not give any 

132 



important additional yield. We must soon increase our avail- 
able supply by raising the level of Haggetts Pond, as sug- 
gested in 1945, by developing nearby areas, or by some other 
means not now in sight. 

Sewerage 

Since 1945 your Committee has continued to advise the 
necessity of sewerage construction in Ballardvale. Constant 
growth of this part of the Town, with increased water 
usage, has brought about conditions in the center of the area 
which cannot longer be tolerated. The Massachusetts De- 
partment of Public Health has strongly recommended to the 
Local Board of Health that immediate action be taken to 
remedy conditions in parts of this area. 

Your Committee has considered several methods of allevi- 
ation. One would involve the construction of a gravity sewer 
line from the center of Ballardvale to meet the upper end of 
the Town system at Abbott's Bridge. This was suggested in 
our report of 1945. Investigation this year shows that the 
cost of this extension would approach $100,000.00 without 
any local intercepting sewers, would present considerable 
difficulty in construction because of the very slight difference 
in grade available, and would add a significant amount of 
sewage to that which now must be pumped daily in our 
rather antiquated pumping station. 

A second method would be the construction of a force 
main from the center of Ballardvale to the present sewer. 
This would cost a little less than the gravity line, and might 
be somewhat easier to install, but it would entail continuous 
pumping and maintenance which means a fairly high annual 
cost. 

Your Committee has also investigated the possibilities 
of utilizing a separate system for Ballardvale, with a local 
treatment plant to discharge into the Shawsheen River. One 
separate system plan which was considered could take care 
of the irrunediate pressing needs of about twenty dwellings. 
Some of these dwellings are on River Street and the others 
are in the general area of the Post Office. It would cost 
$25,000.00 to $30,000.00 to construct collecting sewers which 
would serve these houses, and others situated on the line 

133 



which the laterals would follow. Probably 150 persons would 
be tributary to this system. The necessary treatment plant 
to handle the sewage collected under this scheme would cost 
about $25,000.00 

An alternate and more desirable separate system would 
consist of a type of treatment plant which could be expanded 
when needed, with an integrated system of laterals which 
can be made to fit in with an overall development of the 
district. 

To extend the collecting sewers to serve most of the re- 
maining area in Ballardvale would increase the cost of sewer 
lines to not over $45,000.00 total. This would serve a popu- 
lation of about 350 now, and could be later extended to near- 
by areas. It would be advisable to construct a treatment 
plant to furnish capacity for about 600 persons, to allow for 
increase in population, increase in water consumption, and 
later extensions of the sewers. The estimated cost of such 
a plant, including the cost of land and approach and dis- 
charge sewer lines, is about $40,000.00. If necessary later, 
additional capacity could be added at relatively low cost. 

This alternate plan seems to your Committee to be much 
more economical and farsighted, and we therefore recom- 
mend that the Town appropriate $80,000.00 this year, to 
build the treatment plant, and to construct collectors to take 
in the worst areas and for extensions as far beyond as funds 
will permit. The eventual return to the Town from sewer 
assessments would be about $30,000.00. 

Your Committee calls your attention to other areas in 
which sewerage is now inadequate, and where extensions 
must be made immediately or in the near future. These 
areas include upper Salem Street, Appletree Lane, Holt 
Road, Bancroft Road, Wildwood Road, Orchard Street and 
other sections off South Main Street. Upper Summer Street 
is also a critical area and it is understood that an article for 
sewer construction there will be included in the 1953 war- 
rant. In considering these problems the Town should be 
prepared to make the necessary expenditures in the near 

134 



future and should make the necessary engineering studies 
at once. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph A. McCarthy, Chairman 
William R. Edwards 
Sidney P. White 



135 



Andover Town Infirmary 

January 1, 1953 
Board of Selectmen, Andover, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

The annual report of the Town Infirmary for the year 
1952 is hereby given. 

We have given shelter to eleven persons during the past 
year, four of whom are no longer here. One was a transient 
World War I veteran who needed a place to stay for the 
night, as he had come from Togus, Maine on his way to 
Brockton after an operation, and whose funds had run out. 
Two others were ill and had to be sent to a rest home and 
another institution, and our oldest resident died the 5th of 
December after a two weeks' illness. Although the general 
health of the folks in the home is good, increasing age brings 
on sickness which cannot be resisted so well as when they 
were young, and we have had several bouts with colds and 
other ailments which have required the presence and advice 
of doctors. 

During the year we acquired a deep freeze unit which 
makes it possible to buy quantities of food at a time and get 
wholesale prices. Three floors in the back part of the house 
were relaid with new linoleum and two new mattresses were 
bought. Bids were received for painting the house on the 
outside, but it was getting too cold to do the work, so this has 
been put over as a project for this year. 

We were given a fine rating by the state inspector, Mrs. 
Doyle, who came in May to see is. 

A new entertainment for the folks has been given the past 
year in the form of moving pictures furnished by the Salva- 
tion Army of Lawrence once a month. 

Mrs. Mary C. Edmands, who has been matron for the 
past five years, resigned in April of 1952, and her daughter, 
who has been assistant during that time took her place. 
Mrs. Edmands is at the Infirmary for the present. 

136 



The Christmas season was made merry as different or- 
ganizations and individuals in town remembered the shut-ins 
here at the home with gifts and cards. The folks had fine 
Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners and every birthday a 
cake is baked by the matron for the special occasion. The 
Abbot Academy Christian Association, The King's Daugh- 
ters, the November Club, the Sacred Heart Sodality, groups 
of carolers and friends of the family are especially thanked 
for the interest they took in the Infirmary during the year. 

Number of Inmates, January 1, 1952 10 

Number admitted during year 1 

Number discharged during year 3 

Number died during year 1 

Number of Inmates, Januray 1, 1953 7 

Number between 60 and 70 years of age 1 

Number between 70 and 80 years of age 4 

Number between 80 and 90 years of age 2 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jean E. Weeks, Matron 



137 



Fire Department 



February 9, 1953 

Board of Selectmen 
Town Hall 
Andover, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to submit my twelfth annual report as 
Chief of the Andover Fire Dept. 

During the year 1952 the department answered the fol- 
lowing alarms: 62 Bell; 226 Stills; 2 False; Total 288. 

Assessed value of buildings where fires occurred was $1,- 
311,550.00. 

Loss in buildings where fires occurred was $34,136.76. 

Ambulance calls for the year totaled 634. 

Power burners inspected 266, range burners 79, liquefied 
petroleum systems 84, fire prevention inspections in public 
and mercantile buildings 170. Total inspections 569. 

The new American-LaFrance 1000 gal. pumper, author- 
ized by the Town Meeting in March, was put in service 
August 25, 1952. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. Edward Buchan, Chief 
Andover Fire Dept. 



138 



Police Department 

January 15, 1953 

To the Board of Selectman, 
Andover, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen : 

I hereby submit my report of the Police Department for 
the year ending December 31, 1952. 

Miscellaneous complaints received and investigated 491 

Bicycles stolen in Andover 19 

Summons served for out of town police 102 

Bicycles recovered in Andover 16 

Automobiles stolen in Andover 4 

Breaks in Camps and Dwellings 23 

Automobiles recovered in Andover 4 

Doors in Business District found open and secured 153 

Runaway children returned to parents or institutions 17 

Lost children returned to parents 16 

Dogs killed by automobiles 33 

Dogs gassed by Police 4 

Street Lights reported out to Lawrence Gas Co. 329 

Dogs lost and returned to owner 80 
Board of Health and animal Inspector notified on dog bites 33 

Number of persons bitten by dogs 33 

Cattle lost and returned to owners 5 

Dead bodies cared for by police 2 

Suicides reported and investigated by police 1 

Attempted suicides 1 

Persons notified for out of town police 29 

Tramps put up for night in lock-up 1 

Dwelling houses inspected while owners away 217 

Articles found and returned to owners 20 

Summons served on local complaints in Andover 27 

Fires discovered by Police 3 

Missing persons reported, located and returned 11 

Highway conditions reported to B. P. W. 18 

139 



Tree Dept. notified of limbs and trees down in streets 9 

Persons taken to Danvers State Hosp. by Police 7 

Persons taken to Hospital by Police in Cruisers 16 

Hens killed by dogs, investigated by Police 50 

False alarms of fire investigated by Police 2 

Burglar Alarms set off and investigated by Police 8 

Articles Lost 24 

Bell alarm of fire covered by Police 50 

Persons injured by 22 cal. rifle 1 

Autos towed to Garage 3 

Dogs injured by Automobiles 23 

Cards sent to Registry of Motor Vehicles 55 

Stray dogs picked up by Police 14 

Persons injured by air guns 2 

Breaks — Business District 9 

Articles stolen 24 

Cattle killed and injured by gunshot 2 

Hens stolen 23 

Pigs stolen 9 

Fires put out by Police 1 

B. and H. notified of unsanitary conditions 1 

Law. G. and E. and Telephone notified of wires down 3 

Persons killed in automobile accidents 4 

Personal Injury automobile accidents 71 

Persons injured in automobile accidents 112 

Property Damage automobile accidents 187 

Arrests and Charges 

Assault and Battery 1 

Assault on Officer 1 

Armed Robbery 2 

Allowing improper person to operate Automobile 3 

Burglarious Tools in possession 2 

Breaking and Entering 4 

Collecting Junk without a license 1 

Delinquent Children 12 

Drunkenness 53 

Default Warrant 1 

Displaying of Red Light on Automobile 1 

Displaying of Blue Light on Automobile 1 

140 



Disturbing the Peace 3 

Failure to slow at intersection 2 

Failure to stop for Red Traffic Light 1 

Failure to keep to right of travel way 19 
Indecent Assault 
Indecent Exposure 
Idle and Disorderly 
Improper Equipment 
Larcency 

Larceny Automobile 
Lewdness 

Non-Support 4 

Operating to Endanger 2 

Operating after Revocation of License 2 

Operating without a License 18 

Operating after Suspension of License 4 

Operating under Influence of Liquor 10 

Operating unregistered and uninsured car 1 

Operating without Registration in Possession 1 

Operating wrong way on one way street 3 

Overtime Parking 15 

Passing on Hill 1 

Passing School Bus without stopping 2 

Property Damage 1 

Refusing to stop for Officer in Uniform 5 

Speeding 102 

Unauthorized use of Motor Vehicle 3 

Violation of Fish and Game Law 1 

Vagrancy 6 

Leaving scene of accident 3 

Disposition of Cases 

Convicted in District Court and Trial Court 208 

On File 16 

Probation 17 

Released by Probation Officer 28 

Dismissed 4 

Turned over to out of town Police 5 

Sentenced to House of Correction 7 

Sentenced to Concord Reformatory 2 

141 



Sentenced to Bridgewater 2 

Sentenced to State Prison 1 

Fines Paid in District Court and Trial Court $2,265.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

William R. Hickey 



142 



Board of Health Nurse and Agent 



December 31, 1952 

To the Board of Health and Townspeople of Andover 

I herewith submit a brief report as Board of Health Nurse 
and Agent for the Town of Andover for the year 1952: 

1952 1951 1950 



Dog Bite 


33 


45 


26 


Tuberculosis 


5 


3 


3 


Scarlet Fever 


2 


19 


17 


Chicken Pox 


14 


19 


82 


Whooping Cough 


19 


8 


12 


Measles 


148 


16 


2 


Mumps 


52 


72 


6 


Syphilis 


1 


3 


3 


Gonorrhea 


1 








Infectious Jaundice 








1 


Meningitis 





4 





Anterior Poliomyelitis 








2 


German Measles 


12 


48 


2 


Typhoid Fever 


1 








Undulant Fever 


1 








Totals 


289 


237 


156 


Deaths from Contagious Diseases 






Influenzal Meningitis 





1 





Pulmonary Tuberculosis 


2 


1 


2 



Totals 2 2 2 

In 1953, Andover will continue to hold free clinics. Among 
these clinics will be Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoid innocu- 
lations for children entering school, the Baby Clinic, and the 
Anti-Rabic Clinic for Dogs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lotta M. Johnson, R.N., R.S. 

143 



Milk Inspector's Report 



To the Toivnspeople of Andover: 

I submit herewith a brief summary of the activities of my 
office for the year ending December 31, 1952. 

The following licenses were granted and fees for the same 
turned over to the Town Treasurer whose receipts I hold: 
Milk and Cream — 69 (a decrease of 2 from 1951) 

Oleomargarine — 27 (an increase of 2 from 1951) 

Ice Cream and Frozen Desserts — 3 (same as 1951) 

Pasteurization of Milk — 5 (same as 1951) 

Once again we have seen an increase in the number of 
licenses for oleomargarine. This is an interesting trend 
probably caused by the price of butter and the realization 
that oleomargarine is just as nutritious as butter. 

During the year 56 samples of milk and six samples of 
cream were evaluated from butter fat and total solids. Ten 
samples were assayed for total bacterial count at my Boston 
laboratory. Two samples of the entire lot assayed were not 
up to state standards and the producers were notified ac- 
cordingly. 

Periodic inspection trips were made to all establishments 
licensed by this office. 

In cooperation with the Board of Health, initial steps have 
been taken to expand our facilities for the testing of dairy 
products. We have surveyed the need for new equipment and 
expect in a period of a few years to be able to equip our 
laboratory with the necessary items for the bacteriological 
examination of samples. This will be done slowly. At the 
present time we are purchasing items that will not material- 
ly change over a period of years. Glassware and such stable 
items represent standard equipment that we can use later 
to carry out bacterial counting of our milk samples. 

We again request the cooperation of all citizens to help 
us is our work of keeping our Rules and Regulations in full 
operation. 

Robert A. Walsh, Milk Inspector 

144 



Report of Building Inspector 



January 1, 1953 



To the Board of Selectmen, 
Town of Andover, Mass. 



During the year 1952 this Department has issued One 
Hundred and Seventy-Six (176) permits for New Buildings 
and Eighty-Four (84 permits for Additions and Alterations. 

The estimated cost represented by applications filed and 
permits issued for New Buildings total One Million Nine 
Hundred Eight Thousand Six Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($1,908,650.00). 

The estimated cost as shown by permits issued for Addi- 
tions and Alterations is One Hundred Seventy Two Thous- 
and Six Hundred Dollars ($172,600.00) . 

Total estimated building cost for 1952 — Two Million 
Eighty One Thousand Two Hundred and Fifty Dollars. 
($2,081,250.00). 

New Building Permits are classified below — 



Single Residences 

Single Car Garages 

Two Car Garages 

Trailer Residences 

Camps 

Tool Storage 

Pig Shelter 

Hen Houses 

Silo 

Green House 

Barn 

Observatory 

Cellars 

Temporary Bldg. 

Piggery and Storage 

Temporary Trailer Residence 

Factory Building 



120 
17 
6 
2 
3 
3 
1 
3 



14i 



Wood Shed 

Gasoline Pump House 

Summer Shelter 

Roadside Stand 

Work Shop 

Brooder House 

Vegetable Wash Stand 

Store 

Storage Shed 2 

This Department has collected in fees and turned over to 
the Town ' Treasurer Two Thousand Three Hundred One 
Dollars ($2,301.00). 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ralph W. Coleman, Building Inspector 



Report of Wire Inspector 

January 5, 1953 
Board of Selectmen, 
Andover, Massachusets 

Gentlemen : 

I hereby submit my report for wire inspections for the 
year 1952. 

Number of wire inspections 540 

Number of fixture inspections 47 



Total 587 

Amount collected and turned over to treasurer, Town of 
Andover $587.00. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William J. Young, Wire Inspector 

146 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 



December 31, 1952 

Board of Selectmen 
Andover, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen : 

I hereby submit my annual report for the year 1952 : 

Work performed from January 1, 1952 to December 31, 
1952 inclusive including Scales, Weights, Gasoline meters, 
Vehicle tank systems, etc. : 

Adjusted Sealed Not Sealed Condemned 
Total 75 570 3 4 

Other Work Performed 

Complaints investigated 7 

Trial weighings and measurements of commodities 

- put up for sale 651 

Other inspections : Pedlars, oil & coal certificates 625 

Total collections for the year 1952 were, $273.75. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph Serio, Sealer 



147 



Report of Tree Warden 



To the Citizens of Andover: — 

Sixty young trees were planted in 1952, some to replace 
trees taken down, others on new streets. These trees were 
purchased out of regular Tree Department funds along with 
fertilizer and peat moss used in planting. 

Good specimen trees are on short order at the nurseries 
and the price is on the up grade. 

Many split trees were cabled and some cavity work was 
done in the late fall. All dead trees were removed. Much 
pruning of dead wood was done in various sections of the 
town. 

The sum of $150.00 was appropriated by the Andover 
Village Improvement Society for the purchase of new trees 
to be planted by the Tree Warden. Some of these trees are 
of a specie not generally found in this section. A report will 
be given the society as to specie and where planted. 

The sum of $500.00 was appropriated by the Andover Vil- 
lage Improvement Society to be used by the Tree Warden to 
purchase chemicals and pay for labor for the purpose of 
eradicating poisen ivy along the roadsides. The past gener- 
osity of the society in allotting money for this work has re- 
sulted in the disappearance of this poisenous plant on many 
of our roadsides; this year being the first time that every 
roadside in town was treated. Of this sum of $500.00, $473.- 
79 was spent, leaving a balance of $26.21. 

The new tractor-mower purchased in 1952 to be used 
jointly by the Tree Department and the Board of Public 
Works was used successfully for roadside mowing at periods 
between June and November. It has been converted for 
snow plowing and will have to be reconverted for roadside 
mowing. 

The electric saw, voted at last town meeting, was a great 
help in removing dutch elm trees and the usual run of dead 
trees. 

148 



Sufficient rains in 1951 and 1952 aided many trees to re- 
cover from the drouth years. Paved roads, walks and drouth 
retard the growth of street trees. A weakened tree is easy 
prey for borers, and where possible weak trees should be 
leaf fed. Under most favorable growing conditions street 
elms and norway maples need some pruning every three 
years, rock or sugar maples and oak every four or five years. 

Hazards to the men climbing trees have increased by the 
stepping up of voltage in wires running through trees from 
2300 volts to 4160 volts. On three streets, Webster St., 
Chandler Road, and River Road 13,000 volts are encount- 
ered. 

This department is grateful to the Lawrence Electric 
Company for its cooperation on numerous occasions for 
changing over high voltage wires and for the loan of safety 
equipment while removing trees. This department is also 
grateful to the Police and Fire Department and Board of 
Public Works for their assistance in time of storm damage. 

I recommend the sum of $12,590.00 be appropriated to 
carry on the work of this department. 

George R. Abbott, Tree Warden 



149 



Report of Moth Superintendent 



To the Board of Selectmen 
Town of Andover 

Gentlemen : — 

The moth department continued its fight against leaf 
chewing and fungus carrying insects in 1952 and our road- 
sides showed very little signs of the unsightly tent caterpil- 
lar and fall web worm. There are many different insects to 
be controlled and repeated sprayings are necessary. The va- 
rious insects having life cycles running from six days to 
twenty-two weeks, feeding on different trees at different 
times, make it necessary to cover the same territory three 
and sometimes four times. 

To continue the regular work of the moth department in 
1953 I recommend that $8,450.00 be appropriated. 



The dutch elm disease is still a very serious challenge to 
entomologists in this country and Canada. The moth depart- 
ment is doing everything it can with the knowledge avail- 
able and the fund appropriated. The moth department has 
done some experimenting on this disease and is continuing 
along that line in the hope of coming up with something that 
will lessen the great toll being taken of the elms. Dutch elm 
disease was found in ninety-eight trees in 1952, an increase 
of three over 1951. Part of the town was sprayed twice by 
helicopter and I think with good results. Many samples of 
elms suspected of having dutch elm disease were taken and 
sent to the Shade Tree Laboratory at Amherst where cul- 
tures were taken. Many of these samples were reported back 
as sterile and some indicated disease other than dutch elm. 
To acquire these samples the town was scouted twice with an 
interval of eight weeks between scoutings. Private property 
also was scouted along with streets. 

150 



In addition to the helicopter spraying all street elms were 
sprayed twice with the moth department sprayers and in 
some spots where infestation of beetle carrying the fungus 
was expected were sprayed three times. 

I recommend that 8,000.00 be appropriated for dutch elm 
control in the coming year. 

George R. Abbott, Moth Superintendent 



151 



Report Special Committee 
Tree and B.P.W. Consolidation 



At the annual town meeting of the town of Andover, held 
on March 17, 1952, the town adopted Article 46 of the Town 
Warrant, as follows : 

"VOTED : That the moderator appoint a com- 
mittee of three to study the possibility of consoli- 
dating the Tree Department into the Board of 
Public Works, in order to achieve greater operating 
economies, the committee to report its findings at 
the next annual town meeting." 

Pursuant to the foregoing vote, the moderator, Arthur 
Sweeney, appointed the following committee : 

Edmond E. Hammond, Porter Road, Andover, Mass. . 
Ellsworth H. Lewis, 1 Sherbourne Street, Andover, Mass, 
Joseph F. Bacigalupo, 27 William Street, Andover, Mass. 

Following their appointment the members of the commit- 
tee met and organized, with Mr. Hammond as chairman, and 
Mr. Lewis as clerk of the committee. 

After its organization the committee held a number of 
hearings, at which it interviewed the tree warden, members 
of the board of selectmen, members of the board of public 
works, a tree consultant and other witnesses. The commit- 
tee also consulted officials of other towns where the tree de- 
partment had been consolidated into the board of public 
works or department having corresponding duties. 

From the testimony given to it, and from its independent 
investigations, the committee made the following findings : 

1. That the man power of the tree department and the 
moth department, and the man power of the board of public 
works are not fully utilized at all seasons of the year. 

152 






This, the committee concluded, was not due to any inten- 
tional default on the part of either department, but was more 
likely due to the fact that each department was interested 
primarily in its own activities. 

2. The equipment of the tree department was not fully 
used at all seasons of the year, there being periods when 
some of this equipment with minor changes have been used 
by the board of public works. 

3. That there is a lack of cooperation between the two 
departments, which has resulted in the board of public 
works hiring, at town expense, outside agencies to remove 
trees in connection with its highway program, when this 
work could have been done by the tree department if the two 
departments had cooperated and coordinated their work. 

4. That the motorized equipment of the tree department 
is now serviced by private agencies, and that much of this 
servicing could be done by the mechanic employed by the de- 
partment of public works. 

5. It would appear that if there were a pool of the labor 
and equipment of each department, that whenever emergen- 
cies exist, due to heavy storms, an accumulation of work or 
absence of personnel due to vacations or illness, that the ser- 
vices required by the town could be rendered more efficiently 
and with less cost to the town by a full utilization of the man 
power and equipment of each department. 

6. The investigations of the committee disclose that sub- 
stantial sums of money are annually paid to the tree warden, 
or" to an employee of the tree warden's department, for su- 
pervision and inspection of trimming of trees by the public 
utilities, such as the Lawrence Gas and Electric Company 
and the New England Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
This money was not paid in to the town treasury, but was 
retained by the tree warden, or the employee, as the case 
may be. In 1952 it appears that the tree warden was paid at 
least $1,387.50 up to December 18, and that approximately 
$400 more would be paid to him for further 1952 services, in 
supervising work done for the Lawrence Gas and Electric 
Company by agencies employed by it. This money is re- 

153 



tained by the tree warden, and is in addition to the salary 
fixed for his services as tree warden and as moth superin- 
tendent, and paid by the town. The commitee has been un- 
able to find out the amount of money paid by the New Eng- 
land Telephone and Telegraph Company, but all such ser- 
vices are paid for at the rate of $15 per day. Consolidation 
of the tree deaprtment with the board of public works should 
result in this money being paid to the town treasury. 

7. Other towns in Massachusetts have consolidated their 
tree work and moth work into their department of public 
works, or agencies having corresponding duties, and have 
effected economies for the town without impairment of effici- 
ency or services. 



Conclusions of Committee 

Your committee concludes that the consolidation of the 
tree department and the moth superintendent's department 
into the department of public works would effect the follow- 
ing economies: 

1. Savings to the town in its employment of labor. 

2. Savings to the town in the use of town equipment. 

3. Savings to the town in the servicing of town equip- 
ment. 

4. Better service to the town in its highway program. 

5. Additional income to the town, in that money paid by 
the utilities for the inspection and supervision of tree trim- 
ming work should, by instruction, go to the town, rather 
than to any individual. 

6. Better supervision of town employees and town equip- 
ment, in that the department of public works would have 
more responsibility with respect thereto. 

7. Future purchases and replacement of equipment can 
be made with a view to making such equipment adaptable for 
the needs both of tree work and highway operations. 

154 



Your committee is fully conscious of the fact that the foli- 
age and trees of the town of Andover are among its greatest 
assets, and that these should be in no way neglected. We 
have found no reason to question the knowledge of Mr. 
George R. Abbott, tree warden, concerning trees and foliage. 
To adequately protect and preserve them it would be of 
course be the responsibility of the board of public works to 
procure and put in charge of the tree department and moth 
extermination department, a man completely and fully 
qualified by way of experience, knowledge and ability to car- 
ry on and supervise such work. 



Recommendations of the Committee 

Your committee recommends that the tree department and 
moth department be made a division of the department of 
public works, and consolidated with and into that depart- 
ment, and your committee respectfully urges the town to 
adopt that Article of the Warrant which provides for such 
consolidation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edmond E. Hammond 
Ellsworth H. Lewis 
Joseph F. Bacigalupo 



155 



Report of Civil Defense Agency 



To the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Andover 
Gentlemen : 

I hereby submit the annual report of the Civil Defense 
Agency of the Town of Andover. 

Andover is still classified as a Reception Area, having the 
responsibility of supplying food, clothing, and shelter to 
evacuees from Target Areas. Thus the organization of a 
Civilian War Aid Division of Civil Defense is of prime im- 
portance. Much of this work has been accomplished through 
the cooperation of the Headmaster of Phillips Academy in 
allowing the use of personnel and buildings for this import- 
ant function. Due to location and concentration of personnel 
and building, Phillips Academy offers the best possible 
source of immediate civilian war aid to evacuees from the 
Boston Target Area. It is estimated that approximately 
8000 people could be fed daily, and 2000 people given emer- 
gency shelter in the various buildings designated for that 
purpose at Phillips Academy. Detailed plans for the regis- 
tration, housing, and feeding of evacuees have been formu- 
lated, and are at present being consolidated into the overall 
planning for such a Civilian War Aid Division in Andover. 
In the town itself, buildings have been designated as Em- 
ergency Shelters and have been accepted by the State Agen- 
cy, thereby becoming part of the State planning. 

Another important division of the Civil Defense Agency 
is the Medical and Health Division both at State level and 
local level. As far as the State Agency is concerned, the 
paper-work phase is completed, and practical work is about 
to begin. Requests have gone out to local levels to form 
Cadres for First Aid Stations in order that training mate- 
rial can be sent to such stations. A cadre list has already 
been sent to the State Agency by the Medical and Health 
Officer in Andover. A survey of all Medical, Nursing, and 
Allied Personnel was conducted during the latter part of 
the year, and the results were turned over to the Region and 
State Headquarters. In the latter part of July of 1952, a 

156 



blood typing program was conducted. Over eight hundred 
people took advantage of this service which would have cost 
$5 to $10 individually if done by a doctor or in a hospital. 
The success of this program was, for the most part, due to 
the work of Red Cross volunteers who were most coopera- 
tive. 

The most active division of Civil Defense at the present 
time is the Auxiliary Police Department. This is true in 
most cities and towns in the state. The organization has 
changed very little in the two years it has been activated 
showing that the members are interested in Andover's first 
line of defense. On many occasions, such as parades, Hal- 
loween, and fires, the auxiliary police have volunteered 
their services, and were of great assistance to the regular 
police. Three pistol teams have been formed, and great 
progress has been made in a short time. All teams compete 
in the New England Police Revolver League Postal Matches 
held each year. During the past year a total of 22 medals 
were won by the members of the local teams. The late Chief 
George A. Dane was a staunch supporter of the Auxiliary 
Police, and his death was a great loss to them. He firmly be- 
lieved that this group of men trained to assist the regular 
police department would be of vital service to the town in 
time of emergency. 

As far as the other divisions of Civil Defense are concern- 
ed, only a basic organization is available at the present time. 
In Communications, Auxiliary Fire Department, and Air- 
Ground Observation Corps, key personnel have been assign- 
ed, but volunteers are needed to complete the program. Ba- 
sic equipment has been purchased in the past, and is being 
used both for Civil Defense work and other town functions 
wherever possible. 

I wish to take this opportunity to thank those who have 
participated in the Civil Defense program during the past 
year. I also wish to state that volunteers are needed to fill 
the necessary functions of Civil Defense, and urge everyone 
interested to join the organization. 

Respectfully yours, 
David Nicoll, Director, Civil Defense 
157 



Town of Andover — Jury List 



JUNE, 1952 



Abbott, Richard W. 
Allicon, Gertrude A. 
Anderson, Ernest E. 
Andrew, T. Edwin Jr. 
Bailey, Ralph A. 
Bailey, Samuel H. Jr. 
Barcroft, Harold 
Barnard, Elizabeth F. D. 
Barrett, Joseph F. 
Barss, Helen W. 
Beedie, Alexander 
Belul, Febi 
Bernardin, Mary V. 
Bird, William F. 
Blake, Preston H. 
Blake, Winston A. 
Boutwell, Everett S. 
Brierly, James 
Brown, Christine J. 
Buchan, Raymond L. 
Burke, Garrett J. 
Burke, Sarah J. 
Burton, Everett D. 
Butler, Anna 0. 
Cairnie, Henry 
Campbell, George W. 
Carey, Edna B. 
Chadwick, Etta 
Chadwick, Harry 
Chadwick, Nathaniel 
Cheever, W. Abbott 
Clark, Augusta F. 
Clark, Granville A. 
Clark, Wilbur T. 
Clough, Harry E. 



Builder 25 Upland Rd. 

Nurse 115 Holt Rd. 

Farmer Ballardvale Rd. 
Real Est. & Ins. 14 Riverina Rd. 

Salesman Porter Rd. 

Retired 33 Morton St. 

YMCA Sec. 34 y 2 Summer St. 

Housewife 14 Cabot Rd. 

Salesman 102 Chestnut St. 

Housewife Hidden Field 

Janitor 8 Elm St. 
Rubber Worker 109 Pine St. 

Housewife 11 Abbot St. 

Salesman 12 Canterbury St. 

Food Broker 7 Stratford Rd. 

Food Broker 5 Startford Rd. 

Farmer High Plain Rd. 
Operative 7 Tewksbury St., B.V. 

Housewife 4 Stratford Rd. 

Retired 12 Lincoln St. 

Funeral Dir. 390 No. Main St. 

Undertaker 39 No. Main St. 

Retired 294 Maple Ave. 

Housewife 72 Poor St. 

Shipper 120 No. Main St. 

Ins. Agent So. Main St. 

Housewife 33 Balmoral St. 

Housewife 50A Whittier St. 

Janitor 34 Avon St. 

Clerk 4 Main St., Terr. 

Artist 219 Salem St. 

Housewife 30 Chestnut St. 

Elec. Dealer 100 Elm St. 

Guard 6 Liberty St. 

Ins. Agent 117 Chestnut St. 



158 



Collins, Florence I. 
Collins, William F. 
Cookson, Francis R. 
Curtis, Albert A. 
Darby, James J. 
Denoncourt, Roland 
Disbrow, Walter A. 
Doherty, William R. 
Doyle, Irene 
Draper, Ralph L. 
Driscoll, John J. 
Drolet, Henry E. 
Duffy, Elizabeth I. 
Dunbar, Mary C. 
Dunnells, Mabel R. 
Eastman, Floyd W. 
Easton, Craig B. 
Eaton, Lucy A. 
Emmons, Grace G. 
Erhardt, Frederick A. 
Erving, John M. Jr. 
Fairweather, James D. 
Fleming, Edward H. Jr. 
Flint, Edwin M. 
Forbes, David A. 
Gagne, Dorothy F. 
Gahm, George L. 
Gens, Harold F. 
Glines, Arthur B. 
Godfrey, Harold T. 
Golden, William H. 
Gordon, Ella M. 
Gordon, Walter N. 
Gouck, Harry 
Greenhow, John M. 
Greenwood, Ralph L. 
Haselton, Mabel M. 
Hill, Charles A. Jr. 
Hill, Marion E. 



Housewife 38 Maple Ave. 
Retired 18 Washington St. 

Photographer 123 Main St. 

Banker 15 Cedar Rd. 

Salesman 125 Main St. 

Chauffeur 93 Abbot St. 

Operative Chandler Rd. 

Insurance 21 Harding St. 

Housewife Chandler Rd. 

Mech. Eng. 27 Bartlet St. 

Storekeeper 36 Summer St. 

Real Estate Lowell St. 

Housewife 4 Arundel St. 

Housewife 53 Phillips St. 

At home 103 Abbot St. 

Clerk 83 Chestnut St. 

Retired 36 Walnut Ave. 

Housewife 49 Abbot St. 

Housewife 50 York St. 

Salesman 66 Park St. 

Asst. mgr. 59 Salem St. 

Caretaker 15 Abbot St. 

Painter 37 Maple Ave. 

Farmer Pleasant St. 

Janitor 1 Sweeney Court 
H'wif e & Treas. 5 Kensington St. 

Retired 23 William St. 

Real Estate 187 Chestnut St. 

Electrician So. Main St. 

Salesman 33 Pasho St. 

Farmer 22 Carmel Rd. 

Textile worker Lowell St. 
Maintenance Dept. 47 Union St. 

Clerk lOBurnhamRd. 

Retired 124 Main St. 

Operative Tewksbury St. 

Housewife 11 Cheever Cir. 

Electrician 13 Chestnut St. 
Purchasing Agt. 93 Central St. 



159 



Hodge, Robert 
Howe, Carolyn D. 
Johnson, Leonard P. 
Jones, Arthur W. 
Jones, Lucius P. 
Kearn, Frederick J. 
Killorin, Karl 
Knipe, Wilson Jr. 
Krinsky, Morris 
Lawrence, Camille 
Lindsay, Edith F. 
Livingston, Delia M. 
Livingston, Harold S. 
Lundergan, Charles J. 
MacDonald, David 
Markey, Gertrude M. 
McDonald, William L. 
McFarlin, Margaret H. 
McGhie, Gavin H. 
Mill, Victor J. Jr. 
Milne, David 
Monan, Joseph C. 
Monro, Frances 
Mooar, Mary R. 
Morehouse, W. Ray 
Mosher, James R. 
Mowat, Raymond G. 
Murray, John M. 
Nason, Harry C. 
Nowell, Frederick N. 
Noyes, May L. 
O'Connell, John F. 
O'Connor, Michael J. 
Otis, Herbert H. 
Pendleton, Andrew S. 
Peterson, Elmer 0. 
Pike, Walter N. 
Piper, Gladys M. 
Poland, William 



Retired 
Saleswoman 
Architect 
Clerk 



74 Chestnut St. 

234 Highland Rd. 

22 York St. 

98 Main St. 



Baseball Scout. 10 Stratford St. 
Carpenter Haggetts Pond Rd. 

Real Estate 77 Main St. 

Clerk 1 Stratford Rd. 

Junk Dealer 41 Elm St. 

Cashier 4 Lewis St. 

Housewife Lincoln Cir. 

Housewife Brown St. 

Florist 107 Abbot St. 

Painter 68 Essex St. 

Operative 1 Upland Rd. 

Housewife 48 Chestnut St. 

Retired Railroad St. 

Housewife 2 Punchard Ave. 

Railroad 72 Clark Rd. 

Mfgr. 4 Cedar Rd. 

Laborer 20 Cuba St. 

Tel. Co. Tester 7 Argyle St. 

Housewife 105 Chestnut St. 

Housewife Lowell St. 

Service Mgr. 124 Chestnut St 

Clerk 78 Haverhill St. 

Real Estate 104 Pine St. 
Gas Station Prop. 27 Summer St. 

Carpenter 369 Andover St. 

Property Mgr. 63 Chestnut St. 

General Work 19 Lovejoy St. 

Counsellor 1 Punchard Ave. 

Chauffeur 49 Elm St. 

Insurance 70 Summer St. 

Poultryman Dascomb Rd. 

Poultryman Greenwood Rd. 

Core, maker 18 Walnut Ave. 
Burler 29 Canterbury St. 

Clerk 37 High St. 






160 



Polgreen, John A. 
Quigley, Evelyn M. 
Rafton, Helen G. 
Regan, Charles D. 
Remmes, Joseph T. 
Robbins, Ralph I. 
Robertson, Foster G. 
Rooks, Barbara L. 
Sherry, Frank R. 
Shorrock, Bessie R. 
Sjostrom, Iva L. Jr. 
Smith, Arthur J. 
Smith, Frederick C. 
Smith, Frederick H. 
Smith, Geraldine P. 
Spinney, Charles H. 
Stedman, Herbert D. 
Stevens, Carl H. 
Stopf ord, William W. 
Sullivan, Augustine P. 
Sutton, Osborne 
Symonds, Eva M. 
Taylor, Josephine B. 
Teichert, Elsie M. 
Thomas, Horace R. 
Thomson, James G. 
Trow, Henry J. 
Wade, Albert H. 
Ward, Everett T. 
Ward Roswell E. 
Weeks, Clarence H. 
Weimar, Helen N. 
Wetterberg, Carl A. 
Wetterberg, Glennie P. 
Williams, Isabelle M. 
Zalla, Eugene 
Zecchini, John A. 



Insurance 36 Whittier St 

Housewife So. Main St. 

Chemist & Housewife Alden Rd. 
Gas Sta. Prop. 79 Summer St. 
Electrician Woodland Rd. 

Mech. engr. Red Spring Rd. 

Caretaker 7 Canterbury St. 

Gift Shop Mgr. 8 Lincoln St. 
Pattern Maker 247 Andover St. 
Housewife 8 Maple Ave. 

Organist 84 Main St. 

Bricklayer Rattlesnake Hill Rd. 
Insurance 6 Stratford Rd. 

Real Estate 86 Main St. 

Housewife 20 Johnson Rd. 

Machinist 97 Chestnut St. 

Florist 78 Lowell St. 

Contractor 11 Virginia Rd. 

Operative 50 Chestnut St. 

Accountant 34 Essex St. 

Candymaker 119 Chestnut St. 
Housewife 4 Beech Cir. 

Housewife 38 Canterbury St. 
Housewife West Knoll Rd. 

Retired 15 Memorial Cir. 

Operative 42 Summer St. 

Chauffeur 56 River St. 

Retired 91 Lowell St. 

Ins. Agent 72 Park St. 

Salesman 2 Brechin Terr. 

Commercial Agt. 66 Chestnut St. 
Housewife 21 High Plain Rd. 
Janitor 53 Summer St. 

Housewife 53 Summer St. 

Housewife Lincoln St. 

Shipping Clerk 3 Chester St. 
Salesman County Rd. 



161 



Trustees and Staff of Memorial 
Hall Library 



CAROLINE P. LEAVITT LEO F. DALEY 
E. DEAN WALEN ARTHUR W. REYNOLDS 

JOSEPH SERIO WILLIAM N. PERRY 

ALAN R. BLACKMER 



Chairman 
ARTHUR W. REYNOLDS 

Secretary 
WILLIAM N. PERRY 

Treasurer 
LEO F. DALEY 

Librarian 
MIRIAM PUTNAM 

MARGARET D. MANNING, Assistant Librarian, in 
charge. Readers' Services 

MARGARET LANE, Children' s Librarian 

MARY F. ZECCHINI, Catalog and Reference Librarian** 

ELEANORE G. BLISS, Circulation Assistant* 

CAROLYN S. BENDROTH, Secretarial Assistant 

M. ETHEL ZINK, Branch Librarian, Ballard Vale 

Janitor 
ARCHIBALD D. MACLAREN 
* Part-time 
**Resigned 

162 



LIBRARY BOOKS AND LIBRARY READERS 

Library reports over a number of years have attempted 
to interpret the library's progress in terms of how well it 
seemed to be carrying out its announced objectives. If, on 
the whole, the reports have struck a positive note, the fact 
that there is often a gap between objective and performance 
has not gone entirely unnoticed. One year the report was 
concerned with the community character of the library; 
another with its unique aptitude for serving the individual. 
At no time has the library felt called upon to justify its 
stock and trade for it has felt that its main goal is to develop 
new readers and to make books ever more attractive through 
its individual reader guidance and the many-sided program 
which it provides. However, with more and more time im- 
pinged upon by radio and television and with less and less 
margin of time available for quiet contemplation, the be- 
ginning of 1953 may be an excellent time to think about 
books, ideas and creative readers and to consider their place 
in everyday life. 

Why People Read 

If we take a moment to consider why we read and the 
effect that this reading has upon us, we are brought up short 
with the realization that it is a highly personal matter for 
which it is difficult to discover easily the underlaying mo- 
tives. Almost anyone though, who reads at all, we are sure 
would agree with Milton that "books are not absolutely dead 
things but do contain a potency of life in them ..." That 
power may and does differ with different people but it is 
there all the same. 

and What Books Mean To Them 
A young woman reveals that her basic reason for reading 
is to broaden her understanding and experience and to make 
her better able to relate herself to her world. Someone shares 
with us his joy in recognizing the source of an editorial il- 
lusion to the "Big-Endians and Little-Endians" which a re- 
cent rereading of "Gulliver's Travels" made possible. An 
individual tells of the impact of a particular book which 
changed certain aspects of his life. Someone compares the 

163 



drive to read with the thirst of a person lost in a desert with- 
out water. A man speaks of the ameliorative character of 
books and suggests that the thoughtful reading of good 
books on current problems and about faraway peoples may 
contribute to the building of a peaceful world. In fact al- 
most everyday we are reminded of the diversity of reading 
interests and of reading tastes that differ with need and 
and mood. Indeed we believe that individuals who delight 
in ideas and in the aesthetic experience which comes with 
the reading of well-written, artistic books, are themselves 
sharing in the creative process when they bring to their 
reading sensitive, responsive and critical minds. 

Not all reading has to be of this kind to have value. The 
man who told us that books in the library's collection has 
prepared him for a new and better job was suggesting the 
power that books can have in increasing vocational compe- 
tency. The young man who has built a seventeen foot boat 
from a plan in a library book has had a tremendously con- 
crete example of the usefulness of books. 

It is not adults alone whose horizons or competency are 
expanded by books. Children find their own joy in them and 
show us constantly how much of what they read they apply 
imaginatively or informatively in their daily lives. 

The Library Builds on Books 

As we have already pointed out, it is difficult to tell exact- 
ly what effect our reading has upon us. Perhaps the effect 
of reading can never be completely known. It is a relief in 
a way to find that there are things too elusive and precious 
to be caught precisely with the measuring rods now at the 
social scientist's disposal. Yet we know how very helpful 
it would be every now and then to have statistics which 
might show how many people through interaction with 
good books worked inner miracles upon themselves, con- 
tributed more effectively to their community, became better 
fathers, mothers, employers, employees, librarians, teachers, 
etc. It must happen someway that good reading done over 
a period of time does come to a kind of flowering. If we 
become what we eat, why not also what we read. For books 

164 



can act as stimulators as well as anondynes. This library be- 
lieves firmly that man's object in living is to build a larger 
excellence for himself and his fellows. This belief is re- 
flected in all that it does : in the kinds of books that it buys, 
in the book lists that it compiles, in the books which it pro- 
motes through timely and seasonal displays, in the groups 
that it sponsors, in its use of films and recordings to make 
ideas exciting to an ever widening audience of young and 
old in the Andover community. 

and Personal Service 
There are plenty of people who know what they want from 
books and can find their way around a library perfectly com- 
petently. They may make relatively little demand upon 
its book selection and other guidance services. Yet there are 
other people, not so sure of what it is they want, who could 
perhaps increase their joy in books and their rewards from 
them, if only the proper climate for book reading could be 
established. Here it seems is the preeminent contribution 
of the good public library and particularly the small public 
library which does not need to sacrifice standards of book 
selection and book knowledge on the part of its staff when 
it adds such important ingredients to book counselling as 
friendliness and informality. 

Can Interest in Books Be Stimulated? 

The whole matter of why some people read books and 
others do not is a perennially fascinating one. Fascinating, 
too, is the variety found in reading habits: some people 
read many types of books, others only one ; some only seri- 
ous books, others only those relatively ephemeral in charac- 
ter. Specifically why do some people, relatively few, seek in 
books the information for a better understanding of cur- 
rent problems whose wise solution are of common concern? 
Certainly not because they are the only ones with real con- 
cern. The answer must lie deeper since reading studies, 
however inconclusive, have shown that most people are 
interested in matters which are of vital importance to them. 
Perhaps the complexity of the problems deter them or per- 
haps they may not realize the wealth of readable books, 
pamphlets and periodicals which are available for their use. 

165 



How far can reading interests be stimulated or latent po- 
tentialities be brought alive? We know how much the in- 
spired teacher with the informed mind and high enthusiasm 
can do in kindling a like interest in his subject in his stud- 
ent. We believe skillful librarians can do something very 
much the same. Every day, too, we see the effect of the en- 
thusiastic reader in promoting a much enjoyed book among 
his circle of friends. The Memerial Hall Library's whole 
program is set-up in the believe that interest in books and 
ideas can be stimulated. 

These Things Happened 

At this point some space should be given to activities, 
services and happenings in the library year just passed 
which relate particularly to this consideration of books and 
readers. A few must suffice, not equally important, but in- 
teresting to an understanding of the library's objectives and 
program. 

Service to The Central Elementary 
School Library 

Extension of service to the new Central Elementary 
School Library was perhaps the most important single new 
undertaking in 1952. It was an opportunity to reach more 
boys and girls directly with books, to demonstrate on a limit- 
ed scale the central place of the library in an elementary 
school, to work more closely with school personnel, to be- 
come better acquainted with curriculum needs. The out- 
growth of this demonstration could take one of two direc- 
tions: (1) the School Department might assume full res- 
ponsibility for school library service for this group, with the 
public library working in informal cooperation; or (2) the 
Memorial Hall Library might assume responsibility for all 
library service to elementary age boys and girls in the com- 
munity under some contractual arrangement with the School 
department. The important thing will be to arrive at a so- 
lution which will bring the best, most economical, over-all 
book service to Andover boys and girls. 

Special mention of the school service in no way dimish- 
es the importance of all the other things which our Young 

166 



People's Library continues to carry on : personal book guid- 
ance, film and story hours, and the many other activities de- 
signed to make the library essential to boys and girls for 
whose free time there are so many competitors. 

The Library — Community Center and Resource 

High among 1952's durable satisfactions was the commu- 
nity United Nations Week observance which the library 
spearheaded. The library welcomes this kind of opportunity 
to work closely with groups and individuals on a project im- 
portant not only to this community's well-being but to that 
of the larger community. It is hard to measure results but 
we believe that the effort helped to increase information 
about the United Nations and to underline individual respon- 
sibility for its success. 

Memorable, too, was the library's Open House in Novem- 
ber when David McCord shared his poems with a delighted 
group of creative listeners. 

The Register and Vote Campaign, participated in by 
many local, state and national organizations, found a ready 
ally in this library. Books on all aspects of the campaign 
were prominently featured during the six months before 
November 4 and found a ready, if not large, audience. 

There were three instances which might be selected to 
point up the power of books and the significance of the libra- 
ry as a community center and resource : ( 1 ) when the Ando- 
ver Chapter No. 18 of the Disabled American Veterans pre- 
sented the library with the book Those Devils in Baggy 
Pants as a living memorial to an Andover boy killed in Ko- 
rea; (2) when the Andover Council of Churches gave to the 
library as a community agency one of the presentation copies 
of the New Revised version of the Bible, at the celebration 
marking this important publishing event; (3) when the art. 
work of Andover Junior and Senior High Schools and Pike 
School was displayed in the library reading room. 

The Library and Audio Visual Aids 

The record collection continues to grow and to be en- 
joyed. A considerable number of non-musical recordings — 
poetry, plays, history — were added this past year and found 

167 



a substantial audience. Many times a person borrowing a 
record takes along, too, the play or poetry on which the re- 
cording is based which seems to us proof that one media 
reinforces another. 

A second record player and a film strip projector were 
added to the library's audio-visual equipment. The film strip 
projector was used for the first time during United Nations 
week when it was borrowed by a number of schools to show 
film strips about the work of the UN and its organizations. 

A Staff Change 

The first break in staff organization in several years came 
in September with Mary F. Zecchini's resignation as Cata- 
log and Reference Librarian. Apart from her contribution 
to the library in other ways, we should like to mention parti- 
cularly her special interest in the record collection which was 
largely developed under her direction. So far the vacancy 
has not been filled, but we hope that we shall be in a better 
position to find an outstanding young librarian in June when 
this year's library school graduates become available. 

There Will Always Be Books 

Prophets of doom can be found who will agree with 
Georges Duhamel that "little by little people are finding 
ways of satisfying their thirst for knowledge without re- 
course to books" and that the time will come "when the 
human race will keep its recipe for living, not in libraries 
but on ebonite disks and gelatine films". The library be- 
lieves contrary to this point of view that the public for books 
is constantly being extended due to the increased number of 
people educated to use books, to the publishing of more read- 
able and interesting informational books, to the impetus of 
other media in opening up new fields of interests to be ex- 
" plored in books and to the continued existence of a hard core 
of those for whom the physical book will always be a neces- 
sity. We should like to end our report on this note: "The 
world of books is the world of man's thought and effort, joy 
and purpose and inextinguishable hope, as they pass in heri- 
tage from the past to the present and as they are born of 
each immediate moment". 

168 



1952 STATISTICS OF LIBRARY USE 
BOOK STOCK 



Volumes at beginning of year 
Volumes added by purchase 
Volumes added by gift 
Volumes lost or withdrawn 
Lost volumes found 



Adult 
37,459 

1,371 
63 

1,017 



Juvenile 

10,393 

1,017 

4 

521 



Total 

47,852 

2,388 

67 

1,538 



37,878 10,893 48,771 

Newspapers & periodicals currently received 151 

Periodicals received by gift 34 

USE 

% of total 

Volumes Circulation 

Volumes of adult fiction loaned 36,336 31.2 

Volumes of non-fiction loaned 33,565 28.8 

*Number of children's books loaned 39,393 33.9 
Number of adult records loaned 5,073 

Number of children's records loaned 1,550 06.1 
Number of pictures loaned 544 

Total number of books, records, etc. 

loaned 116,461 

REGISTRATION 

Adult Juvenile Total 
Borrowers registered during the year 580 348 928 
Total number of registered borrowers 3,608 1,854 5,462 
Circulation per capita (base on 1950 census figures) 9.4 

(12,437) 

*Included in this total is 7151 recorded School circulation. 
Total books sent on school deposit number 8,219 and each 
of these books was probably used from two to twenty times. 
The library, however, counts only recorded circulation. 



169 



Board of Public Works 



Andover, Mass. 
Jaunary 1, 1953 

The Board of Public Works voted to adopt the following 
report of the Superintendent and Engineer as its report for 
1952 with recommendations for 1953. 

Sidney P. White, Chairman 
Alexander H. Henderson, Secretary 
P. Leroy Wilson 
Victor J. Mill, Jr. 
Ernest N. Hall 



170 



Report of Superintendent 
and Engineer 



To the Board of Public Works: 
Gentlemen : 

The idea of combining our reports this year seemed a 
practical one, since in former separate reports it was dif- 
ficult to avoid some overlapping. We therefore respectfully 
submit this combined report covering the construction and 
engineering phases of this department for the calendar year 
of 1952. 

In addition to performing all engineering work for the 
Board of Public Works and its various subdivisions, en- 
gineering assistance has been furnished to various other 
Town Departments when requested. 

At the request of the Board of Selectmen, plans were pre- 
pared for the rezoning and development of the Shaw Proper- 
ty rear land for use as a municipal free parking lot. 

Also for the Selectmen, assistance was given in the renum- 
bering of a portion of High Plain Road, and the relocation of 
a town boundary monument adjacent to Tewksbury near the 
Shawsheen River. This monument known as A-Tl (W.M.) 
is nearly submerged in marshland and is to be replaced by a 
new marker on higher ground. 

Assistance has been furnished to the Recreation Commit- 
tee for the laying out and grading of a Little League baseball 
diamond at the Playstead and for the preliminary grading of 
a skating area in the rear of the Central Elementary School. 
Minor assistance was also furnished for the regrading work 
in the rear yard of the Bradlee School. 

Much time has been spent with various engineers, surve- 
yors, and real estate developers in going over their proposals 
and the town's requirements relative to the development of 
new streets and subdivisions. Insofar as was possible in- 

171 



spection was made of all construction work performed on 
new ways which may become town ways in the future. In 
this connection it is gratifying to note that on August 15th 
this Board adopted a set of minimum standards of construc- 
tion for private ways that are planned for acceptance. These 
minimum standards now serve as a concrete guide to plan- 
ners and developers, and as a working tool for this office in 
passing on new construction. 

Miscellaneous advice and estimating assistance has been 
given to private individuals who wished to prepare and sub- 
mit special articles to the town meeting. All persons calling 
upon this office for information and assistance have been 
aided as much as possible. The more common requests per- 
tain to street line location, water main location, and sewer 
main data. 

HIGHWAY 

The following table in inches shows the snowfall for the 
year 1952: 

January 

February 

March 

November 

December 

Total 

The snowfall for the season November 1951 to March 1952 
inclusive totaled 48.5 inches. 

The following road surfaces were treated with tarvia and 
a majority honed: Woburn Street, Ballardvale Road, Abbot 
Street, Sunset Rock Road, Rattlesnake Hill Road, Appletree 
Lane, Prospect Road, Salem Street, Gardner Avenue, York 
Street, Burnham Road, Argyle Street, Sterling Street, Stin- 
son Road, Vine Street, Holt Road, Avon Street, Upland 
Road, Highland Road, Stonehedge Road, Foster Circle, 
Stratford Road, Summer Street, Elm Court, Florence Street, 
Cedar Road, Gould Road, High Plain Road, Andover Street, 
Church Street, Center Street, High Street (B.V.), Tewks- 
bury Street, Carlisle Street, Dumbarton Street, Sutherland 

172 

i 



17.4 


Inches 


17.2 


Inches 


2.4 


Inches 




Trace 


1.5 


Inches 


38.5 


Inches 



Street, Chandler Road, William Street, Cheever Circle, Wal- 
nut Avenue, Flint Circle, Greenwood Road, Brundrett Ave- 
nue, Laurel Lane, Boutwell Road, Wood Hill Road, Pleasant 
Street, Bailey Road, Fiske Road, Greenwood Road, Blan- 
chard Street, Bellevue Road, Haggetts Pond Road, Reserva- 
tion Road, Bartlet Street, Essex Street, Buxton Court, 
Shepley Street, Binney Street, Riverina Road, Walker Ave- 
nue, Fletcher Street, Arundel Street, Carisbrooke Street, 
Magnolia Avenue, Wildwood Road, Pearson Street, Salem 
Street, Rocky Hill Road, Bannister Road, Moraine Street, 
Red Spring Road, Virginia Road, Cutler Road, Hidden Road, 
Woods Road. 

A total of 96,830 gallons of tar were applied. 

On Greenwood Road rough grading and shaping was con- 
tinued, and some portions of the new location line were open- 
ed to traffic. No fine grading or paving was done this year. 
An old stone culvert carrying a brook from George H. Win- 
slow's land under Greenwood Road was replaced by 36 L.F. 
of 30 inch R.C.C.P. and new headwalls were constructed. It 
is anticipated that this road will be hard surfaced from 
Lowell Street to High Plain Road in 1953. 

Beacon Street was improved from Lowell Street to the 
West Center School. Drainage consisting of 36 L.F. of 12" 
R.C.C.P. for a cross culvert, 382 L.F. of 10" plain C.C.P. 
for side drain, and 4 catch basins was installed. The trav- 
eled way was widened and resurfaced, and a bituminous con- 
crete sidewalk was constructed on one side of the road. The 
fencing around the old West Parish School has been removed 
and preliminary grading for a roadway and sidewalk thru 
the school yard has been done. This roadway, which will be a 
cut-off for traffic westbound on Lowell Street into Beacon 
Street, could not be completed this year as the old school 
building, which is to be removed, is in the way of the pro- 
posed relocation. Completion of this job is scheduled for 
early Spring 1953. The cost of this work to date is $6,036.37. 

On Argilla Road, an old tile drain carrying highway water 
thru land of Shtrumpfman was replaced by 160 L.F. of 15" 
R.C.C.P. 

173 



On Brundrett Avenue near River Road an old stone box 
culvert was replaced by 32 L.F. of 15" R.C.C.P. 

On Lowell Street at the newly developed "Shawsheen Hy- 
lands" the outlet of a highway catch basin was extended 135 
L.F. in 10" plain C.C.P. Upon further development in this 
area, this drain outlet will have to be extended further to 
discharge into a concrete box drain being built by the owners 
of this subdivison. 

Several studies with preliminary estimates of cost for 
drainage work at Shawsheen Heights and on William Street 
have been prepared during the year. Conferences relative to 
the need and desirability of furnishing drainage structures 
in this area have been held with interested residents. How- 
ever, due to the expected cost of such work it was generally 
deemed impractical to start any work without special funds. 

During August and September a portion of Rogers Brook 
was enclosed in 60" R.C.C.P. This large diameter pipe ex- 
tends for a distance of 144 L.F. from the Chestnut Street 
culvert to the rear of Coleman's land, and eliminates the 
maintenance of this section of walled brook. 

On Andover Street in Ballardvale new cable guard rail 
was installed on the north side from a point opposite High 
Street westerly to the foot of the hill. 

At the Board of Public Works yard a reinforced concrete 
floor was installed in the newer vehicle storage garage. 

New bituminous sidewalks have been constructed in vari- 
our parts of the town and some older sidewalks reconstruct- 
ed. Besides the new walk previously mentioned on Beacon 
Street to the West Center School, sidewalks improvements 
were made on the east side of Bartlet Street from Chestnut 
Street to the Stowe School, Corbett Street from Princeton 
Avenue Southerly; Park Street, North side from Florence 
Street to Whittier Street and the South side from Bartlet 
Street to Whittier Street ; Oak Street, North side ; Marland 
Street near E. Edward's; Flint Circle, North side; and 
Stevens Street, South side from Shawsheen Road; and sec- 
tion in front of 82 Haverhill Street. 

174 



Cement sidewalks in certain parts of the town are in poor 
condition resulting from tree roots heaving many slab sec- 
tions particularly in Shawsheen Village. Some repair work 
consisting of hot-top replacements has been done on the fol- 
lowing streets: York, Windsor, Kensington, Poor, Wolcott 
Avenue and North Main Street. 

All sidewalk work was done under Article 17, 1951 and 
Article 22, 1952 at a cost of $6,724.12 and using 473 tons of 
hot top material. 

Article 20 covered work done with Chapter 90 Mainten- 
ance funds wherein the Town supplied two thirds and the 
State one third of the cost of $2,000.00. Sections of Lowell 
Street and River Road were armor-coated with RC-5 asphalt 
and pea stone. 

Under Article 21 a rubber tired tractor and snow plow 
blade was purchased at a cost of $2,200.00. This unit is 
shared with the Tree Department in the summer and fall 
and turned over to this Department for use as a sidewalk 
plow in the Winter months. 

BRIDGES 

All the bridges under the control of the Board were in- 
spected during the late Summer and found to be safe for 
their posted load limits. 

The open deck bridges on Central Street and Stevens 
Street were flushed down at the end of the sanding season to 
remove sand and salt from horizontal surfaces and thus 
better protect the paint. 

Some railing and fencing was painted on these two 
bridges ; but none of the load carrying members were paint- 
ed. It is recommended that all bridges be critically examined 
to determine their need for painting and wood preservation 
work. All major bridges have been at least three years with- 
out painting. 

At the approaches of the Andover Street bridge in Bal- 
lardvale, new protective fencing was installed to replace old 
wood rail fencing. A total of 140 L.F. of 42 inch high chain 
link fence was installed under contract by the New England 
Fence Company of Reading, Mass. 

175 



WATER SYSTEM 

The major operation in the Water Department this year 
consisted of the installation of an extension of our 16 inch 
force main by town forces. As a force account job this work 
was noteworthy in that it was the first time that cast iron 
pipe of this diameter has been installed, and the total length 
of 4418.3 L.F. is thought to be greater than any previous 
job. In the past it has been the custom to let all long exten- 
sions and large diameter installations out to contract. 

The 1952 extension of the 16 inch force main extends from 
Phillips Street at Main Street south along Main Street to 
Bancroft Road and thence east on Bancroft Road to a con- 
nection near the pumping station. 

Pipe and materials were received in late July. Work was 
started on August 4th and pipe laying was completed on 
November 17th. Upon the completion of sterilization and 
leakage tests, the main was placed on the system December 
8th, 1952 for regular use. 

This job required a considerable time to perform due to 
the many existing underground pipes and cables crossing 
and running along with the new location; trench ledge in 
large quantities near Hidden Field and near Hidden Road; 
and the complications of heavy traffic on Route 28. All of 
these factors lumped together made it necessary to do much 
of the work with more than usual care and caution, and 
hence slowly. The cost of this work to date is $50,295.31. 

Three short extensions of 6" C.L.C.I. pipe were also con- 
structed by B.P.W. forces during the year, making total new 
installation of mains as follows : 



Virginia Road 100 L.F. 


6" 


C.L.C.I. 


High Plain Road (E. End) 412.7 L.F. 


6" 


C.L.C.I. 


Reservation Road 296.5 L.F. 


6" 


C.L.C.I. 


(Cutler Road N'ly) 






Main Street & So. Main Street 3396.4 L.F. 


16" 


C.L.C.I. 


Bancroft Road 1021.9 L.F. 


16" 


C.L.C.I. 



Materials have been purchased and delivered to the site of 
a proposed under water crossing of the Shawsheen River at 



176 



the rear of the Watson-Park buildings. This line is to be of 
6-inch ball and socket type pipe and will replace the present 
6 inch main which crosses the river on a dilapidated timber 
pipe bridge. Work on this crossing will be done at a time of 
low river level. 

Several water mains of 6 inch C.L.C.I. pipe have been con- 
structed during the year by private interests in the course of 
developing real estate subdivisions. These mains have been 
inspected and tested under the supervision of this office in- 
sofar as possible, and location measurements have taken for 
record purposes. Work of this nature is somewhat difficult 
to control since it is done privately, and much depends on 
the willingness of the owners and contractors involved to 
cooperate with the office. It is to the interest of the town to 
have such inspections and measurements made since nearly 
all private ways ultimately become public highways. 

At the main pumping station on Haggetts Pond a new 
power line has been constructed from Lowell Street. This 
line as constructed in February was for 2300 Volt power, but 
suitable for 4160 Volt usuage when the Lawrence Gas and 
Electric Co. decides to change over to the higher voltage. In 
December this company constructed a 4160 Volt transformer 
structure at the rear of the building and installed suitable 
transformers, so that when power is increased to 4160 V. the 
station will continue to be served by 2300 Volts. 

The Venturi-meter at this station was service checked on 
June 20th and on this same date the Venturi-nozzle at Ban- 
croft Road station was service checked. 

A lightning storm on August 5th damaged the 200 H.P. 
General Electric slip ring motor which drives the DeLaval 
pump at Haggetts Pond station. The motor was in use at the 
time. After conferring with representatives of the insurance 
company it was decided to have this motor removed to the 
shop of the Roland B. Glines Co. in Lawrenc for a complete 
damage survey. This was done on August 22nd and Mr. 
Glines' examination showed that the stator only was dam- 
aged and would require complete rewinding. This work was 
authorized ; but due to excessive delay in procuring the nec- 
essary copper products the job has not been completed as 

177 



yet. Upon the reinstallation of the motor and when all bills 
are in a settlement will be reached with the insurance com- 
pany. 

Since the smaller DeLaval pump was not available for use 
it has been necessary to operate the larger Peerless pump 
from time to time. Some trouble developed on this pump and 
on August 26th the manufacturer replaced the outboard or 
thrust bearing at no cost to the town. No trouble has been 
experienced with this unit since making this repair. 

Subsequent to the above mentioned lightning storm, the 
Board has had a survey made of the old lightning protection 
equipment with a view toward replacing it with more mod- 
ern equipment. Recommendations of the General Electric 
Company are now under consideration by the Board. 

Under Article 17 of the 1952 warrant the town was autho- 
rized to and did purchase 3.49 acres of land adjacent to the 
present Low Service Reservoir off Bancroft Road. This land 
was purchased from George J. Flathers and wife for $4,000.- 
00 and is to be used for reservoir expansion in the future. 

The survey of two parcels of land at the northerly end of 
Haggetts Pond was completed in February, and these two 
parcels were permanently bounded by thirty-two concrete 
markers in November. All town land around Haggetts Pond 
is now definitely marked on the ground either by natural or 
artificial bounds. Some survey work was done to determine 
additional land desirable for town ownership in the event 
that it should become necessary to raise the pond level. 

The condition of Haggetts Pond this year has not been as 
good from a storage viewpoint as it was last year, there be- 
ing a net loss in storage for the year. Precipitation amount- 
ed to 41.61 inches for the year as measured by the Essex 
Company in Lawrence. The 68 year average including 1952 
is 40.68. This excess of nearly one inch of rain over normal 
is not enough to hold our supply even with the demand. 

On the first day of the year the pond was at elevation 116.- 
92 which is about as full as is presently possible due to the 
condition of the outlet dikes. Full pond is considered to be 
at elevation 117.65. The water level gradually lowered 

178 



during the Spring and early Summer, dropping rapidly dur- 
ing June and July which were dry months, recovering some- 
what in August because of heavy rains and then reaching 
its extreme low for the year on November 17 at elevation 
113.48. On the last day of the year the pond level was eleva- 
tion 113.82, or 37 inches lower than it was at the start of the 
year. 

This drop in water level represents a net loss in storage 
of about 211 million gallons for the year, or 0.577 M.G.D. 
The total pumpage for the year was 577.800 million gallons, 
or 1.580 M.G.D. The difference between these average fig- 
ures gives an approximation of the normal yield of the water 
shed, 1.0 M.G.D., which is obviously less than the average 
daily demand. 

The total recorded pumpage at Bancroft Road Station for 
the first complete year of metering was 105.209 million gal- 
lons which represents an average of 287,500 gallons per day. 
This is 18.2% of the total quantity pumped at Haggetts Pond. 
This shows a slight drop in volume from last year; but 
since the 1951 records covered a period of only six months 
their relative accuracy is less. 

RECEIPTS 

Water Rates $72,972.04 

Water Services and Miscellaneous 525.02 



Paid to Town Treasurer $73,497.06 



179 



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180 



SEWERAGE SYSTEM 

The town constructed one new sewer extension this year. 
This was on Magnolia Avenue from the end of the existing 
sewer in Ferndale Avenue northerly to the limit of accept- 
ance on Magnolia Avenue. Total length of this 6 inch sewer 
is 564 L.F. Construction was performed by B.P.W. forces 
in April, at a cost of $2,044.41. 

Private sewers were constructed in Judson Road and in 
Inwood Street. These sewers will become part of the town 
system ultimately. 

A sewerage study has been made of the area above the 
present sewer in Summer street, and estimates of cost for 
various extensions in Summer Street have been made at the 
request of the Board of Health and residents of upper Sum- 
mer Street. 

Some preliminary work has been done in the nature of 
studies for sewers to and in Ballardvale at the request of 
the Special Committee on Water and Sewerage. It is ex- 
pected that 1953 will bring definite study and planning on 
this problem. 

From time to time sewer assessments have been re-investi- 
gated, checked, and special explanations furnished, at the 
insistance of certain abuttors. Sometimes these complaints 
reach back to sewers constructed and assessed as much as 
six years ago. However, no complaints have been sufficient 
to justify abatements this year. 

There were 42 new service connections made in 1952. 



SEWER MAINS 
COST OF CONSTRUCTION 

Sewer Mains — 110,323 Ft. 

Cost to Abuttors $222,946.00 

Cost to Town 407,408.00 

Total $630,354.00 

181 



PARKS 

Under the supervision of this office a rustic fence was de- 
signed and installed along the walled portion of Rogers 
Brook in the Park from Whittier Street westerly. This 
fencing, installed by the New England Fence Co. of Reading, 
extends for a distance of 196' along the brook on each bank 
and should serve to deter persons from falling into the brook 
at its deepest part. 

An area at the northwest corner of the playstead was 
provided for the use of the Little League. Funds from the 
regular Park appropriation were used for the laying out of 
a small sized diamond. 



STREET LIGHTING 



Date 








Annual 


Installed 


Location 


Installed 




Cost 


1/10/52 


Shawsheen Road 


1_1000 L. 




$ 18.00 


1/10/52 


Brown Street 


2—1000 L. 




36.00 


1/25/52 


Essex Street 


(1—2500 L. 


In 








(1—1000 L. 


Out) 


10.00 


1/25/52 


Ballardvale Road 


1—1000 L. 




18.00 


3/20/52 


Brown Street 


2—1000 L. 




36.00 


4/16/52 


Morton Street 


1—1000 L. 




18.00 


4/21/52 


Chestnut Street 


Relocation 




No Charge 


6/16/52 


Hidden Road 


1—1000 L. 




18.00 


9/ 2/52 


Henderson Avenue 


1_1000 L. 




18.00 


9/ 3/52 


Abbot Street 


1—1000 L. 




18.00 


9/25/52 


Shipman Road 


1—1000 L. 




18.00 


9/30/52 


Chandler Road 


2—1000 L. 




36.00 


10/ 1/52 


Stinson Road 


2—1000 L. 




36.00 


11/24/52 


Chesnut Street 


(1—2500 L. 


In 








(1—1000 L. 


Out) 


10.00 



Total Annual Cost for 1952 Changes 



$290.00 



182 



Changes Requested and Pending Installation 




Date 






Requested 






10/29/52 Lincoln Street 


1—1000 L. 


$ 18.00 


1/ 8/53 Lowell Street 


2—1000 L. 


36.00 


4/29/52 Osgood Street 


1_1000 L. 


18.00 


10/ 6/52 Osgood Street 


1_1000 L. 


18.00 


5/ 6/52 Prospect Road 


2—1000 L. 


36.00 



Annual Cost for Lights Pending Installation $126.00 



1953 STREET LIGHTING COSTS 

Annual cost for lights installed as of 1/1/52 $24,062.00 

Annual cost for lights installed during 1952 290.00 

Annual cost for lights pending installation 126.00 



Total Required for 1953 Appropriation to 

Cover Above $24,478.00 

To provide for adequate Street Lighting for 1953, we re- 
commend on appropriation of $26,600.00. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edward R. Lawson, Superintendent 
Warren O. Petersen, Engineer 
January 21, 1953. 



183 



1953 Town Warrant 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Essex, SS 
To Either of the Constables of the Town of Andover, 
Greeting : 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required 
to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are 
qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs to meet and 
assemble at the designated polling places in Precincts One, 
Two, Three, Four, Five and Six, viz: The Central Fire 
Station in Precinct One; the Square and Compass Hall in 
Precinct Two, the Sacred Heart School, Balmoral St. Shaw- 
sheen Village, in Precinct Three ; the Andover Grange Hall 
in Precinct Four; the Fire Station, Ballardvale, in Precinct 
Five; and the Peabody House, Phillips Street, in Precinct 
Six, in said Andover, on 

MONDAY, THE SECOND DAY OF MARCH, 1953 

at 7 : 00 o'clock A. M. to act upon the following articles : 

Article 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, a Treas- 
urer for three years, a Selectman for three years, an Asses- 
sor for three years, a member of the Board of Public Works 
for three years, a member of the Board of Health for three 
years, two members of the School Committee for three years, 
a member of the Planning Board for five years, a Trustee of 
Memorial Hall library for seven years, a member of the 
Andover Housing Authority for five years, a member of the 
Andover Housing Authority for one year to fill a vacancy, a 
Tree Warden for three years, three Constables for one year, 
and any other town officers required by law to be elected by 
ballot. 

All the above candidates to be voted for on one ballot. The 
polls will be open from 7:00 o'clock A.M. to 7:00 o'clock 
P.M. 

184 



After final action on the preceding Article One, the said 
meeting shall stand adjourned by virtue of Section 20, Chap- 
ter 39 of the General Laws, to Monday, March 9th at 7:00 
o'clock P. M. at the Memorial Auditorium, then and there 
to act upon the following articles, namely : 

Article 2. To elect all other officers not required by law 
to be elected by ballot. 

Article 3. To see if the town will vote that a general 
wage increase, not to exceed $5.00 per week to any indivi- 
dual, be granted to all full-time employees except the school 
department and that funds to meet the increase referred to 
be included in the departmental budgets and be put into 
effect April 1,1953. 

Article 4. To see if the town will vote to increase the 
regular weekly wage of the full time employees of the Board 
of Public Works by twenty percent (20%), on petition of 
Oliver Pike and others. 

Article 5. To establish the salary of elected TOWN 
OFFICERS for the ensuing year. 

Article 6. To determine what sums of money shall be 
appropriated for the following purposes : 

Appropriation for the Assessors, Board of Selectmen, 
and all Departments under their control : Appropriation for 
Tree Warden : Appropriation for the Board of Health : Ap- 
propriation for Trustees of Memorial Hall Library : Appro- 
priation for Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery : Appropria- 
tion for School Committee: Appropriation for all Depart- 
ments under the control of the Board of Public Works: 
Appropriation for any other Town Charges and Expenses. 

Article 7. To see if the town will vote to require the 
Board of Selectmen, when sitting as the Board of Selectmen, 
to hold such sittings open to the public, on petition of Ray- 
mond LaRosa and others. 

185 



Article 8. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to sell, all or part of town owned land 
in the triangle bounded southerly by Greenwood Road, 
northerly by Chandler Road and westerly by Ledge Road, 
either by public auction or by private sale, for such price 
and upon such terms as they deem proper and to authorize 
the said Board of Selectmen to execute and deliver a deed 
or deeds of said property in pursuance of this vote. 

Article 9. To see if the town will vote to make the fol- 
owing changes in our building code : 

1. To eliminate Section 7, paragraph 3, of our build- 
ing laws and substitute therefor the following: "All new 
materials, methods of construction, devices, and equipment 
for use in buildings that are not covered by other provisions 
of this law may be approved by the Building Inspector after 
receiving approval of a committee of three members to be 
appointed by the Board of Selectmen." 

2. To add the following sentence to Section 9 of the 
building code : "This section shall not apply to cases covered 
by Article 7." 

Article 10. To see if the town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Chapter 624, acts of 1952 increasing the re- 
tirement allowances and annuities payable to certain former 
town employees retired prior to April 1, 1951. 

Article 11. To see if the town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Chapter 419 of the Acts of 1952 which amends 
Chapter 41 of the General Laws by inserting after Section 
111-E the following Section: 

"Section 111-F. Whenever a police officer or fire fight- 
er of a city, town, or fire district or water district is incapa- 
citated for duty because of injury sustained in the perform- 
ance of his duty without fault of his own, he shall be granted 
leave without loss of pay for the period of such incapacity ; 
provided, that no such leave shall be granted for any period 
after such police officer or fire fighter has been retired or 

186 



pensioned in accordance with law or for any period after a 
physician designated by the board or officer authorized to 
appoint police officers or fire fighters in such city or town, or 
district determines that such incapacity no longer exists. 
All amounts payable under this section shall be paid at the 
same times and in the same manner as, and for all purposes 
shall be deemed to be, the regular compensation of such 
police officer or fire fighter." 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $1000.00 for the purpose of purchasing 
and erecting 270 lineal feet of seven foot high chain link 
fence at the dump off Chandler Road. 

Article 13. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $1000.00 to make an engineering study 
of the playground area north and east of the present baseball 
and football fields at the central playstead. 

Article 14. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $750.00 for the purchase of a new auto- 
mobile for the Police Department, and use the trade in value 
of a 1952 Ford Sedan as part of the purchase price. 

Article 15. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to purchase and develop land near the center of 
town for the purpose of constructing public parking areas, 
and transfer from parking meter funds the amount of $10,- 
000.00 for this purpose, no amount to be expended unless 
approved by the Finance Committee. 

Article 16. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $4000.00 for the purpose of erecting a 
traffic booth in Elm Square that will include the installation 
of the necessary traffic lights to govern all travel at that 
location. 

187 



Article 17. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $1300.00 to be used with the turn in 
value of the old utility truck for the purchase of a new utility 
truck for use in the Fire Department. 

Article 18. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $207.00 for the purpose set forth in 
Chapter 166 of the Acts of 1952 as follows : 

"Section 1. For the purpose of discharging a moral 
obligation, the Town of Andover is hereby authorized to ap- 
propriate the sum of $207.00 and to pay the same to Albert 
Cole, Jr., Deputy Chief of the Fire Department of said town, 
which sum of money is due him under the provisions of Sec- 
tion 24 of Chapter 708 of the acts of 1941, as most recently 
amended by Chapter 203 of the Acts of 1947." on petition of 
Albert Cole, Jr. and others. 

Article 19. To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to repair and build sidewalks, and raise and 
appropriate the amount of $7500.00 therefor. 

Article 20. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the amount of $16300.00 for the purpose of ex- 
tending and improving the water system of the Town of 
Andover, all work to be done under the supervision of the 
Board of Public Works, and no work to be started until ap- 
proved by the Board of Selectmen, the Finance Committee, 
and the Board of Public Works. 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate or transfer from unappropriated available funds 
in the treasury, a sum of money for Chapter 90 Highway 
Maintenance, or take any action in relation thereto. 

Article 22 To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to purchase three sand spreaders, and raise 
and appropriate the amount of $1595.00 therefor. 

188 



Article 23. To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to purchase one snow loader, and raise and 
appropriate the amount of $12000.00 therefor. 

Article 24. To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to purchase a street sweeping machine, and 
turn in the present 1946 machine as partial payment, and 
raise and appropriate the amount of $9700.00 for the balance 
of payment. 

Article 25. To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to purchase a pickup truck for Water De- 
partment use, and turn in present 1946 Dodge truck as par- 
tial payment, and raise and appropriate the amount of 
$1300.00 for the balance of payment. 

Article 26. To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to purchase a rubber tired tractor with 
Frame and bucket, and turn in the present tractor as partial 
payment, and raise and appropriate the amount of $925.00 
for the balance of payment. 

Article 27. To see if the town .will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to purchase an automobile and raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $1600.00 therefore, and the price al- 
lowed for a 1946 Plymouth Coupe, known as the superintend- 
ent's car, be used as part payment for the new automobile. 

Article 28. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the amount of $4000.00 for purpose of widening a 
portion of Whittier Street near the school property, and for 
constructing additional access roadway to the school parking 
area, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Article 29. To see if the town will vote to purchase a 
parcel of land on Greenwood Road necessary to permit the 
widening and relocation of said road near High Plain Road, 
said parcel being owned by Elmer O. and Betty S. Peterson 
and is shown on a plan on file at the office of the Town Clerk ; 
and grade said portion of relocated road, and raise and ap- 
propriate the amount of $200.00 for said land acquisition 
and construction work, on petition of the Board of Public 
Works. 

189 



Article 30. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the amount of $750.00 for the purpose of construc- 
ting and maintaining baseball diamonds at the Playstead, 
and for the purchase of related materials ; all for use of the 
so-called Little League and all work to be performed under 
the supervision of the Board of Public Works ; on petition of 
the Board of Public Works. 

Article 31. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate, or transfer from available funds, the sum of $80,- 
000.00 to engineer and construct a sewerage system in 
Ballardvale, and to construct a complete sewage treatment 
plant, including all apparatus, appurtenances and ap- 
proaches, and authorize the Selectmen to secure land and 
rights of way for this purpose by purchase or by right of 
eminent domain, on petition of Special Committee on Water 
and Sewerage. 

Article 32. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $2500.00 to be expended under the 
supervision of the Board of Public Works, for the purpose of 
extending and improving the sewerage system of the Town 
of Andover, no work to be started until approved by the 
Board of Health, the Finance Committee, and the Board of 
Public Works, on petition of Special Committee on Water 
and Sewerage. 

Article 33. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $500.00 to be expended for engineering 
study, advice, and similar purposes, under the direction of 
and on petition of the Special Committee on Water and 
Sewerage. 

Article 34. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Public Works to extend the sewer easterly in 
Summer Street for a distance of about 1208 feet from the 
present end opposite 135 Summer Street, and raise and ap- 
propriate the amount of $6150.00 therefor; on petition of 
the Board of Health with the endorsement of the Board of 
Public Works. 

190 



Article 35. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the amount of $1275.00 for the purpose of extend- 
ing the existing storm drain in William Street westerly for 
a distance of about 380 lineal feet ; on petition of Sebastiano 
Magnano and others. 

Article 36. To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to extend the present 10" water main on 
Bailey Road a distance of about 1200 feet from the existing 
dead end, and raise and appropriate the amount of $11,- 
200.00 therefor, on petition of Allan Young and others. 

Article 37. To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to extend the water main from the corner of 
River Road and Brundrett Avenue along Brundrett Avenue 
northerly for a distance of about 1600 feet to the property of 
Jacob Schlakis, and raise and appropriate the amout of 
$6400.00 therefor, on petition of Jacob Schlakis and others. 

Article 38. To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to extend the water line on Salem Street a 
distance of about 3550 feet from the property owned by 
Fred A. Gould to a point opposite the Conway property at 
the corner of Jenkins Road and Salem Street, and raise and 
appropriate the amount of $21,009.00 therefore, on petition 
of John J. Conway and others. 

• Article 39. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
School Committee to continue to maintain State-Aided Voca- 
tional Education in accordance with the provisions of Chap- 
ter 74, General Laws, and Acts amendatory thereto, or de- 
pendent thereon, and further raise and appropriate the sum 
of $1700.00 therefor. 

Article 40. To see if the town will authorize the Mod- 
erator to appoint a school housing planning committee, this 
committee to investigate school housing conditions and to 
formulate long-range school building plans, and appropriate 
the sum of $1000.00 therefor. 

• 191 



Article 41. To see if the town will vote to increase the 
School Committee membership from the present five mem- 
bers to nine members in the following manner : 

By electing three members to the Committee instead 
of only one member at the annual 1954 election, and by elect- 
ing three members to the Committee instead of two at the 
annual 1955 election, and by electing three members to the 
Committee instead of two at the annual 1956 election, there- 
by making it a Committee of nine following the 1956 elec- 
tion, on petition of Helen E. Jolliffe and others. 

Article 42. To see if the town will vote to name the 
new West Andover Elementary School the "Thomas Edward 
Carter Elementary School" in honor of the late Lt. Thomas 
E. Carter, World War I veteran, killed in action November 
4, 1918 at Latuilerie Ferme, France, on petition of Arthur 
R. Lewis and others. 



Article 43. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $600.00 to improve and resurface a 
portion of Central Playground for year round recreational 
purposes, this money to be expended in conjunction with the 
$2300.00 appropriated in 1950 and under the supervision of 
the Board of Public Works and the Committee on Recreation. 



Article 44. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $450.00 for the purpose of purchasing 
a new rotary power mover for Spring Grove Cemetery to 
replace a mower sixteen years old. 



Article 45. To see if the town will vote to make the 
tree department and the moth department divisions of the 
department of public works, to be consolidated with and 
into that department, and to instruct the selectmen to take 
the necessary steps for that consolidation so that final action 
may be taken at the 1954 Annual Town Meeting. 

192 



Article 46. To see if the town will vote to change the 
name of a section of Chandler Road, beginning at Lowell 
Street, opposite Lincoln Street, and running westerly to a 
point known as the dead end circle and accept the name 
Chandler Circle in order that it may be identified from the 
section of Chandler Road which begins on the westerly side 
of Beacon Street and continues to run westerly to River 
Road, on petition of George C. S. Williams and others. 

Article 47. To see if the town will vote to accept as a 
public way and name Beech Circle, as approved by the Board 
of Survey and laid out by the Board of Selectmen. Said way 
being shown on a plan entitled, "Beech Circle" Andover, 
Mass. dated November 1952 and drawn by Ralph B. Bras- 
eur C. E. of Haverhill, Mass. This plan being now on file in 
the office of the Town Clerk, on petition of James L. Handley 
and others. 

Article 48. To see if the town will vote to accept as a 
public way and name Cassimere Street as approved by the 
Board of Survey, laid out by the Board of Selectmen, and 
shown on a plan entitled Subdivision and Acceptance Plan 
of Cassimere Street dated December, 1952, Clinton F. Good- 
win, Registered Professional Engineer, Haverhill, Mass. 
Both plan and description referred to being on file at the 
office of the Town Clerk, on petition of David L. Markert and 
others. 

Article 49. To see is the town will vote to accept as a 
public way, and name Forbes Lane, a distance of 960 feet, 
together with a portion of Karlton Circle extending from the 
end of Forbes Lane to Porter Rd. a distance of 432 ft. ; same 
being approved by the Board of Survey and laid out by the 
Board of Selectmen, as shown on a plan entitled "Acceptance 
plan of Karlton Field, Andover, Mass"; dated June, 1952 
same plan being made by Fred W. Stowers, Civil Engineer 
of Methuen, Mass. Both plan and description referred to 
being on file at the office of the Town Clerk and in the Re- 
gistry of Deeds of Essex County, on petition of Karl C. 
Killorin and others. 

193 



Article 50. To see if the town will vote to accept as a 
public way and name Judson Road, as approved by the 
Board of Survey and laid out by the Board of Selectmen, as 
shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision and Acceptance Plan" 
owner Trustees of Phillips Academy, Clinton F. Goodwin, 
Engineer, dated January, 1952, both plan and description 
referred to being on file at the office of the Town Clerk., on 
petition of William T. Rich III and others. 



Article 51. To see if the town will vote to accept as a 
public way and name Linwood Street, the private way forty 
feet in width shown as Linwood Street on a plan entitled: 
"Acceptance Plan of Proposed Linwood Street, Fred W. 
Stowers, Reg. Surveyor, dated November 1951" recorded 
with North Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 2510, said 
Street extending Southerly from Haverhill Street about 
six hundred (600) feet and thence running Easterly about 
eight hundred (800) feet to Dufton Road Extension, and 
accept as a public way and name Enmore Avenue the way 
running Westerly from the mid-portion of said Linwood 
Street to Enmore street, as shown on said plan, having a 
width of fifty feet and a length of about two hundred feet." 
The plan for both the above streets approved by the Board 
of Survey, laid out by the Board of Selectmen and on file at 
the office of the Town Clerk. This article on petition of Grace 
B. Peters and others. 



Article 52. To see if the town will vote to accept as a 
public way and name Lockway Road from Carmel Road 
northerly to Walnut Avenue as shown on a plan entitled 
Street Acceptance Plan made December 1952 by Clinton F. 
Goodwin, Engineer, Haverhill, Mass. as approved by the 
Board of Survey and laid out by the Board of Selectmen. 
Both the plan and description referred to being on file at the 
office of the Town Clerk, on petition of Phillips B. Marsden, 
Jr. and others. 

194 



Article 53. To see if the town will vote to accept as a 
public way and name Shirley Road, as approved April 4, 
1952 by the Board of Survey, as laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen, as shown on a plan entitled Acceptance Plan for 
Shirley Road, Andover, Mass. made by Charles Cyr, Civil 
Engineer, Lawrence, Mass. Both plan and description re- 
ferred to being on file at the office of the Town Clerk, on pe- 
tition of Carl H. Stevens and others. 

Article 54 To see if the town will vote to accept an ex- 
tension of Sutherland Street, from the present terminus, 
northwestly thereof, as a public way, for a distance of five 
hundred and five linear feet, as approved by the Board of 
Survey and laid out by the Board of Selectmen and shown 
on a plan filed with the Town Clerk, entitled "Plan of Suth- 
erland Street Extension, Andover, Massachusetts, for Ac- 
ceptance" dated December, 1952, Herbert W. Parthun, Civil 
Engineer, on petition of Lillian E. Howe and others. 

Article 55. To see if the town will vote to accept as a 
public way, and name Theodore Ave. for 500 feet, as ap- 
proved by the Board of Survey, and laid out by the 
Board of Selectmen, as shown on a plan entitled Sub-divi- 
sion, and Acceptance Plan-Shawsheen Highlands, made Au- 
gust 19, 1952 by Ralph Brasseur, Engineer, Haverhill, Mass. 
Both plans and descriptions referred to being on file at the 
Town Clerk's Office on petition of George R. Cairns and 
others. 



Article 56. To see if the town will vote to accept as a 
public way and name Alden Road, as approved by the Board 
of Survey and laid out by the Board of Selectmen, as shown 
on the plan entitled "Subdivision and Acceptance Plan for 
Hidden Acres" made on January, 1947 by Clinton F. Good- 
win, both plan and description referred to being on file at 
the Town Clerk's Office, on petition of Johnston Bird and 
others. 



195 



Article 57. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate a certain amount of money for the purpose of sur- 
facing and improving Alden Road, all work to be done under 
the supervision of the Board of Public Works ; on petition of 
Johnston Bird and others. 

Article 58. To see if the Town will accept from J. P. 
Stevens & Co., Inc. a deed of a triangular parcel of land 
situated on the northerly side of Stevens Street in Andover, 
bounded and described as follows : 

Beginning at the most easterly corner thereof at a 
drill hole in the sidewalk in the northerly line of 
Stevens street* as laid out in February 1885, said 
drill hole being located 10.50' southwesterly from a 
drill hole in the concrete sidewalk marking the in- 
tersection of the northerly line of Stevens Street 
with the westerly line of North Main Street ; thence 
N. 66°-07'W by the said northerly line of Stevens 
Street 113.30' to a spike in the pavement at land of 
the grantor ; thence turning and running N.49°-59'- 
30"E by said land of the grantor 58.40' to an iron 
pipe marking an angle in said line ; thence turning 
and running N. 81°-51'E. still by remaining land of 
the grantor and point of beginning. 
The above parcel as described contains 917 sq. feet, 
be the same more or less. 

Said parcel being triangular in shape and is shown 
on a plan entitled, "Plan of Land in Andover, Mass. 
to accompany deed from M. T. Stevens & Sons Co. 
to the Town of Andover", Scale l"-20', dated De- 
cember 1952 as made by Clinton F. Goodwin, Reg- 
istered Professional Engineer, Haverhill, Mass. 
and recorded herewith. 

Article 59 To see if the town will vote to accept Chap- 
ter 40, Section 6A of the General Laws which provides that a 
town may appropriate annually a sum not exceeding one 
two-hundredths of one percent of the assessed valuation of 
the preceding year for the purpose of advertising its re- 

196 



sources, advantages and attractions, and, as provided under 
said section, the appropriate, or transfer from available 
funds, the sum of $900.00 dollars to be expended by the 
Andover Board of Trade for Christmas Lighting and parti- 
cipation in the publicity program of the Essex County 
Boards of Trade, on petition of the Andover Board of Trade 
and others. 

Article 60. To see if the town will instruct the Modera- 
tor to appoint a committee of five to study the advisability of 
fluoridation of the water supply to help control tooth decay 
in children, a report to be submitted to the next annual town 
meeting, on petition of David L. Darling and others. 

Article 61. To see if the town will vote to authorize and 
empower the town treasurer of the Town of Andover to im- 
print his facsimile signature to and upon any and all notes, 
drafts, checks, orders for the payment of monies and any 
and all other instruments in writing required to be signed 
and endorsed by said town treasurer, and direct that the 
facsimile signature of the said town treasurer shall have the 
same effect and validity thereon as the written signature of 
the said town treasurer, on petition of Thaxter Eaton and 
others. 

Article 62. To see if the town will vote to accept $4308.- 
00, received in 1952 for the perpetual care of lots in Spring 
Grove Cemetery, $100.00 for a flower fund, and the Kate 
Adams Swift fund of $300.00 for the use of Memorial Hall 
Library, on petition of Thaxter Eaton, Treasurer. 

Article 63 To see if the town will vote to transfer $20,- 
000 from Overlay Reserve to the Reserve Fund. 

Article 64. To see if the town will vote to permit the 
Assessors to use $60,000.00 free cash to reduce the 1953 tax 
rate and to offset appropriations for capital outlay voted at 
the 1953 town meeting. 

197 



Article 65 To determine what disposition shall be made 
of unexpended appropriations and free cash in the treasury. 

Article 66 To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 

Article 67. To transact any other business that may le- 
gally come before the meeting : 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting at- 
tested copies and publication thereof, seven days at least 
before the time and place of said meeting as directed by the 
By-Laws of the town. 

Hereof fail not, and make return of this warrant with 
your doings thereon, at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this Twenty-six day of January 
A.D. 1953. 

Roy E. Hardy 

J. Everett Collins 

Sidney P. White 

Selectmen of Andover 



198 



TOWN OF 

ANDOVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 




ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

TOWN OFFICERS 



For the Fiscal Year Ending 
DECEMBER 31, 1953 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Accounting Taxes and Assessments 88 

Aid to Dependent Children 70 

Animal Inspector 58 

Appropriations for 1953 44 

Armistice Day 78 

Assessors 53, 120 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 89 

Municipal Properties and Public 

Improvements 121 

Balance Sheet 102 

Board of Appeals 130 

Board of Health 61, 143 

Board of Public Welfare 69, 122 

Aid to Dependent Children 70 

Infirmary 72, 137 

Old Age Assistance 71 

Veterans' Services 72, 125 

Board of Public Works 176 

Accounts Receivable 92 

Administrative and Office 82 

Assessments and Receipts 91 

Highways 64 

Sewers 63 

Sidewalks 65 

Snow Removal and Sanding 68 

Superintendent & Town 

Engineer's Report 177 

Trucks, Garage and Repair Shop 65 

Water Maint. and Construction 84 

Water & Sewerage, Special 136 

Bonds, Redemption of See Town Debt 

Building Inspector 59, 146 



PAGE 



Cemetery Funds 
Civilian Defense 



95 

79, 157 



Damages to Persons and Property 79 

Departmental Accounts Receivable 92 

Director of Accounts 39 

Dog Officer 58 

Dutch Elm Disease 60 

Election and Registration 53 

Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital 62 

Expenditures for 1953 51 



Finance Committee 




54 


Fire Department 


57, 


139 


Forest Fires 




58 


General Government 






Election and Registration 




53 


Municipal Buildings 




55 


Town Officers 




4 


Highways 




64 


Housing Authority 




127 


Insurance 




80 


Interest 




86 


Jury List 




159 


Maturing Debt 




87 


Memorial Day 




78 


Memorial Hall Library 77, 


100 : 


, 165 


Library Statistics 




175 


Report of Librarian 




166 


Trustees 




165 


Milk Inspector 




144 


Moderator 




54 


Moth Suppression 


59, 


154 


Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 




89 


Municipal Buildings 




55 


Municipal Properties and Public 




Improvements 




121 


Old Age Assistance 




70 


Overlay 




91 


Parking Meters 


52 


!, 56 


Parks and Playgrounds 




82 


Planning Board 


55, 


132 


Police Department 


56, 


140 


Public Dump 




62 


Punchard Athletic Association 


76 


Receipts for 1953 




44 


Recreation Committee 


83, 


134 


Reserve Fund 




87 


Retirement Report 




114 



*School Department 



PAGE 

73 



School Lunch 75 

Sealer, Weights and Measures 59, 148 
Selectmen 51 

Sewers 63 

Assessments 9 1 

Snow Removal and Sanding 68 

Spring Grove Cemetery 85, 124 

Street Lighting 69 

Tax Collector 52, 117 

Summary of Tax Collector's Cash 

Account 119 

Town Accountant 43, 51 

Town Account 43, 51 

Accounting Taxes and Assessments 

88 

Appropriation for 1953 44 

Balance Sheet 102 

Board of Public Works Accounts 

Receivable 93 



Departmental Accounts 


Receivable 




92 


Director of Accounts 


39 


Expenditures for 1953 


51 


Maturing Debt 


87 


Overlay 


91 


Receipts for 1953 


44 



PAGE 

Reserve Fund 87 

Surplus Revenue 94 

Town Debt 113 

*Trustees of Punchard Free School 

97 



Water Accounts Receivable 


93 


Town Clerk 


38, 53 


Town Counsel 


54 


Town Debt 


113 


Town Infirmary 


72, 137 


Town Meetings 




Proceedings 


14 


Warrants 


9, 189 


Town Officers 


4 


Town Reports 


81 


Town Scales 


81 


Treasurer 


52, 116 


Tree Warden 


60, 149 



Trust Funds 96 

*Trustees of Punchard Free School 97 



Veterans' Quarters 
Veterans' Services 
Vital Statistics 



77 

72, 125 

38 



Water & Sewerage, Special 136 

Water Accounts Receivable 93 

Water Maint. and Construction 84 

Wire Inspector 59, 147 
*Also see School Report 



Town Officers 

ELECTED AND APPOINTED 



Moderator 
Arthur Sweeney 

Board of Selectmen and Public Welfare 
Roy E. Hardy, Chairman Term expires 1954 

J. Everett Collins, Secretary Term expires 1954 

Sidney P. White Term expires 1954 

George H. Winslow, Clerk 
Arthur W. Cole, Agent, Bureau, Old Age Assistance, 

Welfare Board 
Francis P. Markey, Veterans' Services Agent 

Board of Assessors 
Roy E. Hardy, Chairman Term expires 1954 

J. Everett Collins Term expires 1956 

Sidney P. White Term expires 1955 

Town Clerk 
George H. Winslow Term, Tenure 

Collector of Taxes 
James P. Christie Term expires 1955 

Treasurer 
Thaxter Eaton Term expires 1956 

Town Accountant Town Counsel 

George C. Napier Walter C. Tomlinson 

Board of Retirement 
George C. Napier, Chairman Term expires 1955 

Edmond E. Hammond Term expires 1955 

David L. Nicoll, Secretary Term expires 1956 



Board of Public Works 



Sidney P. White, Chairman 

P. Leroy Wilson 

Ernest N. Hall 

Victor J. Mill, Jr. 

Alexander H. Henderson, Secretary 

Warren 0. Petersen, Town Engineer 

Edward R. Lawson, Superintendent 

School Committee 

Dorothy T. Partridge Term 

Anna M. Greeley Term 

C. Carleton Kimball Term 

William A. Doherty, Secretary Term 

Gordon C. Colquhoun, Chairman Term 
Edward I. Erickson, Superintendent 



Term expires 1956 

Term expires 1954 

Term expires 1955 

Term expires 1954 

Term expires 1955 



expires 1956 

expires 1956 

expires 1955 

expires 1955 

expires 1954 



School Housing Planning Committee 
Gordon L. Colquhoun, Chairman 

Vasco E. Nunez Edward I. Erickson 



Anna M. Greeley 
Louis E. Gleason 
Attendance Officer 

John Campbell 
Athletic Medical Director 

John J. McArdle Jr. M. D. 



Howell M. Stillman 
School Physician 

Philip W. Blake, M. D. 
School Nurse 

Ruth E. Wescott, R. N. 



Director, Continuation School 
Carl M. Gahan 



. Board of Health 
Philip W. Blake, M. D. Term expires 1955 

Charles 0. McCullom, Secretary Term expires 1954 

William V. Emmons, Chairman Term expires 1956 

Lotta M. Johnson, R. N., Nurse and Agent 
Robert A. Walsh, Milk Inspector 

Inspector of Slaughtering 
Ray S. Youmans 

5 



Inspector of Buildings Inspector of Plumbing 

Ralph W. Coleman Alexander Thomson 

Planning Board and Board of Survey 
Leon A. Field, Secretary Term expires 1958 

Walter Tomlinson, Chairman Term expires 1954 

Frederick E. Cheever Term expires 1955 

Kirk R. Batcheller Term expires 1956 

Richard C. Simmers Term expires 1957 

Inspector of Wires Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Wiliam J. Young Joseph Serlo 

Wilson Crawford, Deputy 

Inspector of Animals 
Hartwell B. Abbot 

Trustees of Memorial Hall Library 

Joseph Serio Term expires 1955 

Arthur W. Reynolds, Chairman Term expires 1957 

William N. Perry, Secretary Term expires 1954 

Ernest D. Walen Term expires 1958 

Leo F. Daley, Treasurer Term expires 1959 

Alan R. Blackmer Term expires 1960 

Caroline P. Leavitt Term expires 1956 

Trustees of Punchard Free School 
Rev. Frederick B. Noss, President 
Rev. John S. Moses 
Rev. John G. Gaskill 

Edward E. Hammond, Clerk and Treas. Term expires 1955 
Fred W. Doyle Term expires 1955 

Roy E. Hardy Term expires 1955 

Harry Sellars Term expires 1955 

C. Carleton Kimball Term expires 1955 

Trustees of Cornell Fund 
Edward P. Hall Term expires 1956 

Arthur W. Cole Term expires 1954 

Frederick E. Cheever, Treasurer Term expires 1955 



Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery 

Frank R. Petty, Chairman Term expires 1954 

Malcolm E. Lundgren Term expires 1956 

Albert E. Curtis Term expires 1954 

William D. Mclntyre Term expires 1955 

Frederick E. Cheever Term expires 1955 

Board of Registrars 

Ralph A. Bailey, Chairman Term expires 1954 

Walter F. McDonald Term expires 1956 

Eugene A. Zalla Term expires 1955 
George H. Winslow, Clerk 

Finance Committee 

Charles W. Arnold William S. Titcomb, Secretary 

Ernest L. Wilkinson Louis E. Gleason, Chairman 

Charles D. McDuffie Leo F. Daley Norman L. Miller 

Recreation Committee 

Stafford A. Lindsay, Chairman Alan F. Dunlop 

George A. Stanley, Jr. Francis P. Markey 

Alco E. Taylor 

Superintendent of Moth Department 
George R. Abbott Appointed Annually 

' Tree Warden 
George R. Abbott Term expires 1956 

Board of Appeals 

Roy E. Hardy, Secretary Term expires 1956 

James S. Eastham, Chairman Term expires 1955 

Edward P. Hall Term expires 1954 

Walter C. Tomlinson, Associate Member 
Leon A. Field, Associate Member 



Andover Housing Authority 

Garrett J. Burke, State Member — Vice Chairman 

Term expires 1956 
Franklyn K. Haggerty, Chairman Term expires 1956 

Charles Hatch, Asst. Secretary Term expires 1955 

Thomas R. Wallace, Treasurer Term expires 1954 

George A. Noury, Asst. Treasurer Term expires 1958 

Ernest N. Nail, Exec. Director and Secretary 

Fire Department 

Charles E. Buchan, Chief 
Charles E. Buchan, Forest Warden 

Police Department 

David L. Nicoll, Chief 
William R. Hickey, Dog Officer 

Constables 

George N. Sparks Term expires 1954 

George B. Brown Term expires 1954 

Roy A. Russell Term expires 1954 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

Population 1950 Census — 12437 
Registered Voters 1953 — 7668 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISIONS INCLUDING ANDOVER 

Senators 
John F. Kennedy, Boston Leverett Saltonstall, Dover 

Fifth Congressional District 
Edith Nourse Rogers, 444 Andover St. Lowell 

Fifth Councillor District 
Arthur A. Thomson, 49 Greene St., North Andover 

Fourth Essex Senatorial District 
John Adams, 15 Stratford Rd., Andover 

Fifth Essex Representative District 
J. Everett Collins, 35 Summer St. Andover 

Frank S. Giles, 373 Lowell St. Methuen 

William Longworth, 27 Stevens St. Methuen 

Essex County Commissioners 
Arthur A. Thompson, Methuen 

C. F. Nelson Pratt, Saugus 

J. Fred Manning, Lynn 

Selective Service Board 
Samuel Rockwell, Chairman No. Andover 
Martin Lawlor, No. Andover 
George Cargill, Boxford 
Joseph A. Horan, 6 Avon St., Andover 
Thomas Fallon, 58 Maple Ave., Andover 



Annual Town Meeting 



MARCH 2, 1953 



Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, Febru- 
ary 5th, 1953, the Inhabitants of the Town of Andover, 
qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs, met and as- 
sembled at the designated polling places in Precincts One, 
Two, Three, Four, Five and Six, viz: The Central Fire 
Station in Precinct One; the Square and Compass Hall in 
Precinct Two, the Sacred Heart School, Balmoral Street, 
Shawsheen Village, in Precinct Three ; the Andover Grange 
Hall in Precinct Four; the Fire Station, Ballardvale, in 
Precinct Five, and the Peabody House, Phillips Street, in 
Precinct Six, in said Andover on : 

Monday, The Second Day of Makch, 1953 
at 7:00 o'clock A. M. to act upon the following articles: 

Essex, ss. Andover, March 2, 1953 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one 
of the Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the 
inhabitants of said town to meet at the time and places and 
for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true 
and attested copy of the same, on the Town House, on each 
Schoolhouse and in no less than five other public places 
where bills and notices are usually posted and by publication 
in the Andover Townsman. 

Said warrants have been posted and published seven days. 

George N. Sparks, Constable 

Article 1. Election of Officers 

Took up Article 1. and proceeded to vote for Town Officers. 
The Ballot boxes were found to be empty and registered 
0000. The Polls were opened at seven o'clock A. M. and closed 
at seven o'clock P. M. The total number of ballots cast was 
3872— viz: Precinct 1—1044, Precinct 2—751, Precinct 
3_681, Precinct 4—436, Precinct 5—382, Precinct 6— 
578. 

10 



Moderator — for one year 

Precincts 

12 3 4 5 6 

845 558 572 365 318 514 Arthur Sweeney 3172 

199 193 109 71 64 64 Blanks 700 

Selectman — For Three Years 

486 190 216 182 138 290 J. Everett Collins 1502 

199 226 240 176 106 139 Richard K. Gordon 1086 

352 331 213 75 128 142 William L. McDonald 1241 

7 4 12 3 10 7 Blanks 43 

Assessor — For Three Years 

479 183 219 178 138 285 J. Everett Collins 1482 

196 232 226 173 109 144 Richard K. Gordon 1080 

356 327 219 79 128 143 William L. McDonald 1252 

13 9 17 6 7 6 Blanks 58 

Treasurer — One For Three Years 

910 618 569 374 345 532 Treasurer 3348 

134 133 112 62 37 46 Blanks 524 

Board of Public Works — One For Three Years 

345 320 354 126 140 151 Raymond S. LaRosa 1436 

657 399 318 304 231 421 Sidney P. White 2330 

42 32 9 6 11 6 Blanks 106 

School Committee — Two For Three Years 

829 601 537 325 309 463 Anna M. Greeley 3064 

763 496 493 346 297 475 Dorothy T. Partridge 2870 

496 405 332 201 158 218 Blanks 1810 

Board of Health — One For Three Years 

910 614 579 373 332 523 William V. Emmons 3331 

134 137 102 63 50 55 Blanks 541 

Planning Board — One for Five Years 

835 557 566 355 310 493 Leon A. Field 3116 

209 194 115 81 72 85 Blanks 756 

n 



Trustee of Memorial Hall Library — For Seven Years 

Precincts 
12 3 4 5 6 

836 551 562 360 309 509 Alan R. Blackmer 3127 
208 200 119 76 73 69 Blanks 745 

Tree Warden — One For Three Years 

620 392 421 311 145 373 George R. Abbott 2262 

395 319 235 104 231 192 Leo E. Pimpare 1476 

29 40 25 21 6 13 Blanks 134 

Andover Housing Authority — One For Five Years 

778 518 524 336 284 474 George A. Noury 2914 

266 233 157 100 98 104 Blanks 958 

Andover Housing Authority — One For One Year 

(To fill a vacancy) 

800 554 547 352 297 472 Thomas R. Wallace 3022 

244 197 134 84 85 106 Blanks 850 

Constables — Three For One Year 

528 320 367 219 169 317 George B. Brown 1920 
156 107 135 63 33 78 Elmer T. Churchill 571 
56 70 134 68 29 57 John W. Gaudet 414 

308 196 147 167 83 126 Chester J. S. Harnden 1027 

301 287 213 96 108 206 Leo P. Lynch 1211 

693 449 344 233 253 398 Roy A. Russell 2370 

556 372 389 248 301 338 George N. Sparks 2204 

534 452 314 215 170 214 Blanks 1899 
All the foregoing officers were voted for on one ballot and 
the check lists were used. 

REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT 1 

Andover, March 2, 1953 
Polls opened at 7 A. M. Warden in charge, Rowland L. 
Luce. Ballot box registered when polls opened 0000. Polls 
closed at 7 P. M. Ballot box registered when polls closed 1044. 
Number of Ballots received 1999. Absentee ballots 16, 
Total 2015. Number of ballots returned 971. Number of 
ballots cast 1044. Police officer on duty, William Tammany. 
Voted to count ballots at 8 : 15 A. M. 

Joseph W. McNally, Clerk 

12 



REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT 2 

Andover, March 2, 1953 
Polls opened at 7 A. M. Warden in charge, James Doherty. 
Ballot box registered when polls opened 0000. Polls closed 
at 7 P. M. Ballot box registered when polls closed 751. Num- 
ber of ballots cast 751. Police officer on duty Frank Koza. 
Voted to count ballots at 8 : 00 A. M. 

Norman K. MacLeish, Clerk 

REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT 3 

Andover, March 2, 1953 
Polls opened at 7 A. M. Warden in charge, A. Norman 
Warhurst. Ballot Box registered when polls opened 0000. 
Pols closed at 7 P. M. Ballot box registered when polls closed 
681. Number of ballots received 1717. Absentee ballots 2. 
Total 1719. Number of ballots returned 1038. Number of 
ballots cast 681. Police officer on duty, Henry E. Smith. 
Voted to count ballots 10 A. M. 

Garret J. Burke, Clerk 

REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT 4 

Andover, March 2, 1953 
Polls opened at 7 A. M. Warden in charge, Charles B. M. 
Whiteside. Ballot box registered when polls opened 0000. 
Polls closed at 7 P. M. Ballot box registered when polls closed 
436. Number of ballots received 995. Number of ballots re- 
turned 559. Number of ballots cast, 436. Police officer on 
duty, Warren Maddox. Voted to count ballots at 7:02 A. M. 

Lewis D. Lane, Clerk 

REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT 5 

Andover, March 2, 1953 

Polls opened at 7 A. M. Warden in charge William 
Miller, Jr. Ballot box registered when polls opened 0000. 
Polls closed at 7 P. M. Ballot box registered when polls 
closed 382. Number of ballots received 751. Number of 
ballots returned 369. Number of ballots cast 382. Police 
officer on duty, George N. Sparks. Voted to count ballots at 
11 A. M. 

Eugene A. Zalla, Slerk 

13 



REPORT OF CLERK — PRECINCT 6 

- 

Andover, March 2, 1953 

Polls opened at 7 A. M. Warden in charge, Ralph A. 
Bailey. Ballot box registered when polls opened 0000. Polls 
closed at 7 P. M. Ballot box registered when polls closed 578. 
Number of ballots received 1468. Number of Absentee Bal- 
lots, 5. Total 1473. Number of ballots returned 895. Number 
of ballots cast, 578. Police officer on duty, Richard Caldwell. 
Voted to count ballots at 9 : 00 A. M. 

John M. Lynch, Clerk 

After final action of Article One, the said meeting was 
adjourned by virtue of Section 20, Chapter 39 of the General 
Laws to Monday, March 9th, at 7 o'clock P. M. at the Me- 
morial Auditorium. 



14 



Adjourned Town Meeting 

MARCH 9, 1953 



The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 
964 persons admitted to the meeting. The meeting was cal- 
led to order by Arthur Sweeney, Moderator at 7:00 P. M. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit six persons. 

Opening prayer was offered by Rev. Patrick J. Campbell. 

Salute to the flag was led by J. Everett Collins. 

The warrant and return of service by the constable was 
read by the Town Clerk. 

Article 1. — To elect a Moderator for one year, a Treasurer 
for three years, a Selectman for three years, an Assessor for 
three years, a member of the Board of Public Works for 
three years, a member of the Board of Health for three 
years, two members of the School Committee for three years, 
a member of the Planning Board for five years, a Trustee of 
Memorial Hall Library for seven years, a member of the 
Andover Housing Authority for five years, a member of the 
Andover Housing Authority for one year to fill a vacancy, 
a Tree Warden for three years, three Constables for one 
year, and any other town officers required by law to be 
elected by ballot. 

•All the above candidates to be voted for on one ballot. The 
polls will open from 7 :00 o'clock A. M. to 7 : 00 P. M. 

The Town Clerk announced the results of ballot March 
2nd and declared Arthur Sweeney elected as Moderator for 
the ensuing year and he had previously been sworn to faith- 
fully perform the duties of that office. 

The moderator then declared the other successful candi- 
dates elected. 

J. Everett Collins, Selectman for Three Years. 

J. Everett Collins, Assessor for Three Years. 

Thaxter Eaton, Treasurer for Three Years. 

Sidney P. White, Board of Public Works for Three Years. 

15 



Anna M. Greeley, School Committee for Three Years. 

Dorothy T. Partridge, School Committee for Three Years. 

William V. Emmons, Board of Health for Three Years. 

Leon A. Field, Planning Board for Five Years. 

Alan R. Blackmer, Trustee of Memorial Hall Library for 
Seven Years. 

George R. Abbott, Tree Warden for Three Years. 

George A. Noury, Andover Housing Authority for Five 
Years. 

Thomas R. Wallace, Andover Housing Authority for One 
Year, (to fill a vacancy) 

George B. Brown, Constable for One Year. 

Roy A. Russell, Constable for One Year. 

George N. Sparks, Constable for One Year. 

Article 2. — To elect all officers not required by law to be 
elected by ballot. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED Edward P. 
Hall be elected Trustee of Cornell Fund for three years. 

Aritcle 3. — To see if the Town will vote that a general 
wage increase, not to exceed $5.00 per week to any indivi- 
dual, be granted to all full-time employees except the school 
department and that funds to meet the increase referred to 
be included in the departmental budgets and be put into 
effect April 1, 1953. 

Upon motion duly seconded it was VOTED that a general 
wage increase, not to exceed $5.00 per week to any indivi- 
dual, be granted to all full-time employees except the school 
department and the library and that funds to meet the in- 
crease referred to be included in the departmental budgets 
and be put into effect April 1, 1953. 

Article U- — To see if the town will vote to increase the 
regular weekly wage of the full time employees of the Board 
of Public Works by twenty percent (20%), on petition of 
Oliver Pike and others. 

This article was stricken from the Warrant. 

16 



Article 5. — To establish the salary of elected Town Officers 
for the ensuing year. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that the 
salaries of the elected Town Officers for the ensuing year be 
established at: (each item being voted on separately) : 
Chairman, Board of Selectmen per annum $ 800.00 

Two members each per annum 600.00 

Board of Assessors 

Three members each per annum 400.00 

Board of Public Welfare 

Three members each per annum $100.00 

Town Clerk 

To April 1st 3800.00 After April 1st Per Annum 4060.00 
Collector of Taxes 

To April 1st 3800.00 After April 1st Per Annum 4060.00 
Town Treasurer 

To April 1st 3700.00 After April 1st Per Annum 3960.00 
Moth Superintendent and Tree Warden 

combined salary for both per week 

To April 1st 67.00 After April 1st 72.00 

Board of Health 

Three members each per annum 100.00 

Chairman, Board of Public Works 300.00 

Secretary, Board of Public Works 100.00 

Treasurer, Library Trustees 100.00 

Moderator, per meeting 10.00 

•Article 6. — To determine what sums of money shall be 
appropriated for the following purposes : 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to raise and 
appropriate the following sums of money, each item being 
voted on separately: 

American Legion 600.00 

Veterans of Foreign Wars 600.00 

Disabled Veterans 480.00 

Armistice Day 150.00 

Memorial Day 1525.00 

Aid to Dependent Children 15000.00 

Veterans Services 19400.00 

17 



Old Age Assistance 76000.00 

Public Welfare 13000.00 

Disability Assistance 5800.00 

Retirement Fund 22953.00 

Damages to Persons and Property 500.00 

Elections and Registrations 4405.00 

Insurance 20000.00 

Essex T. B. Hospital 19838.04 

Recreation 10894.25 

Public Dump 1500.00 

Printing Town Report 1400.00 

Selectmen 3600.00 

Treasurer 5389.00 

Collector of Taxes 8359.00 
Parking Meter (From meter fund) 300.00 

Accountant 5692.00 

Assessors 11595.00 

Town Clerk 6215.00 

Moderator 30.00 

Town Counsel 750.00 

Finance Committee 20.00 

Planning Board & Survey 200.00 

Board of Appeal 100.00 

Dog Officer 225.00 

Animal Inspector 350.00 

Building Inspector 2355.00 

Town Scales 200.00 

Inspector of wires 1175.00 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 760.00 

Municipal Buildings 9336.00 

Infirmary (Includes 12.76 unpaid bill 1952) 13850.00 

Moth Suppression 8850.00 

Dutch Elm Disease 8400.00 
Police Department (Includes 7.64 unpaid bill 1952) 74450.00 

Parking Meter Account (From meter fund) 4300.00 
Fire Department Includes 110.00 upaid bill 1952) 94025.00 

Brush Fires 1800.00 

Interest 11406.25 

Retirement of Bonds 79000.00 



18 



17000.00 
20250.00 
26600.00 
20560.00 

1,354799.12 
4600.00 

1,359399.12 



Tree Warden 10075.00 

Board of Health 7040.00 

Care of T. B. Patients 3500.00 

Trustees of Memorial Hall Library 

(plus dog license receipts) 35827.58 

Spring Grove Cemetery 18379.00 

School Committee 498690.00 

Highway Maintenance 61150.00 

Water Maintenance 60000.00 

Parks 6400.00 

Sewer Maintenance 7150.00 

Snow Removal and Sanding,(2000. equip, and 

snow removed from private ways) 
Trucks, Garage and Repair Shop 
Street Lighting 
Administrative and Office 
Total to be raised by taxation 
Total not to be raised by taxation 
Grand total appropriated 

Special Articles 

Article 12. — Chain Link fence at dump 1000.00 

Article 13. — Engineering study of playground area 1000.00 
Article 1U. — New Police Automobile 

(Plus turn in 1952 car) 750.00 
Article 15. — Purchase and develop parking areas 

' (From meter fund) 10000.00 

Article 16.— Traffic booth, Elm Square 4000.00 
Article 17. — Utility Truck, Fire Department 

(Turn in old) 1300.00 

Article 18. — Moral obligation to Albert Cole, Jr. 207.00 

Article 19. — Repair and build sidewalks 7500.00 
Article 20. — Extending and Improving Water 

System (Plus carry over from 1952 3678.77) 1300.00 

Article 21 .—Chapter 90— Highway Maintenance 3000.00 

Article 22.— Three Sand Spreades, B.P.W. 1595.00 
Article 23.— Snow Loader, B.P.W. 11000.00 
Article 24.— Street Sweeper B.P.W. 

(Plus turn in old one) 9700.00 



19 



Article 25.— Pick Up Truck, B.P.W. 

(Plus turn in old one) 1300.00 

Article 26.— Tractor, B.P.W. (Plus turn in old one) 925.00 
Article 27.— Supt. Automobile, B.P.W. 

(Plus turn in old one) 1600.00 

Article 28.— Widening Whittier Street 4000.00 

Article 29. — Greenwood Road, purchase of land 

and construction 200.00 

Article 30.—B.F.W. Baseball diamonds at Playstead 750.00 
Article 31. — B.V. Sewer (From Available Funds) 

plus $40000.00 40000.00 

Article 33. — Engineering Study, Special Committee 200.00 
Article 3U> — Sewer Extension, Summer Street 6150.00 

Article 35.— Storm Drain, William Street 1275.00 

Article 39. — State Aided Vocational Education 1700.00 

Article UO. — School planning Committee 1000.00 

Article UU. — Power mower, Spring Grove Cemetery 450.00 

Total Special Articles raised by taxation 101902.00 

Total Special Articles net raised by taxation 203241.93 

Grand Total Budget and Special Articles 1,664543.05 

Article 7. — To see if the town will vote to require the 
Board of Selectmen, when sitting as the Board of Selectmen, 
to hold such sittings open to the public, on petition of Ray- 
mond LaRosa and others. 

Motion made and duly seconded to use secret ballot for 
this article was lost. 

This article was defeated. 

Article 8. — To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to sell, all or part of town owned land 
in the triangle bounded southerly by Greenwood Road, 
northerly by Chandler Road and westerly by Ledge Road, 
either by public auction or by private sale, for such price and 
upon such terms as they deem proper and to deliver a deed 
or deeds of said property in pursuance of this vote. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 8 as read. 

20 



Article 9. — To see if the town will vote to make the follow- 
ing changes in our building code : 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 9 as read. The vote was unanimous. 

Article 10. — To see if the town will vote to accept the pro- 
visions of Chapter 624, acts of 1952 increasing the retire- 
ment allowances and annuities payable to certain former 
town employees retired prior to April 1, 1951. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 10 as read. 

Article 11. — To see if the town will vote to accept the pro- 
visions of Chapter 419 of the Acts of 1952 which amends 
Chapter 41 of the General Laws by inserting after Section 
111-E the following Section : 

"Section 111-F. Whenever a police officer or fire fighter 
of a city, town, or fire district or water district is incapaci- 
tated for duty because of injury sustained in the performan- 
ce of his duty without fault of his own, he shall be granted 
leave without loss of pay for the period of such incapacity : 
provided, that no such leave shall be granted for any period 
after such police officer or fire fighter has been retired or 
pensioned in accordance with law or for any period after a 
physician designated by the board or officer authorized to 
appoint police officers or fire fighters in such city or town, 
or district determines that such incapacity no longer exists. 
All amounts payable under this section shall be paid at the 
same times and in the same manner as, and for all purposes 
shall be deemed to be, the regular compensation of such 
police officer or fire fighter." 

Article 11 was withdrawn from the warrant. 

Article 12. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $1000.00 for the purpose of purchasing 
and erecting 270 lineal feet of seven foot chain link fences 
at the dump off Chandler Road. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 12 as read. 

21 



Article 13. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $1000.00 to make an engineering study 
of the playground area north and east of the present base- 
ball and football fields at the central playstead. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 13 as read. 

Article Ik. — To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $750.00 for the purchase of a new 
automobile for the Police Department, and use the trade in 
value of a 1952 Ford Sedan as part of the purchase price. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 14 as read. 

Article 15. — To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to purchase and develop land near the center of 
town for the purpose of constructing public parking areas, 
and transfer from parking meter funds the amount of 
$1000.00 for this purpose, no amount to be expended unless 
approved by the Finance Committee. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED unanimously 
to accept Article 15 as read. 

Article 16. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $4000.00 for the purpose of erecting a 
traffic booth in Elm Square that will include the installa- 
tion of the necessary traffic lights to govern all travel at that 
location. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 16 as read. 

Article 17. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $1300.00 to be used with the turn in 
value of the old utility truck for the purchase of a new 
utility truck for use in the Fire Department. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 17 as read. 

Article 18. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 

22 



propriate the sum of $207.00 for the purpose set forth in 
Chapter 166 of the Acts of 1952 as follows : 

"Section 1. For the purpose of discharging a moral obli- 
gation, the Town of Andover is hereby authorized to 
appropriate the sum of $207.00 and to pay the same to 
Albert Cole, Jr., Deputy Chief of the Fire Department of 
said town, which sum of money is due him under the pro- 
visions of Section 24 of Chapter 708 of the acts of 1941, as 
most recently amended by Chapter 203 of the Acts of 1947." 
on petition of Albert Cole, Jr. and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 18 as read. 

Article 19. — To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to repair and build sidewalks, and raise 
and appropriate the amount of $7500.00 therefor. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 19 as read. 

Article 20. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the amount of $16300.00 for the purpose of exten- 
ding and improving the water system of the Town of 
Andover, all work to be done under the supervision of the 
Board of Public Works, and no work to be started until 
approved by the Board of Selectmen, the Finance Committee, 
and the Board of Public Works. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to raise and 
appropriate the amount of $1300.00 plus a carry-over of 
$3678.77 from 1952 for the purpose of extending and im- 
proving the water system of the Town of Andover, all work 
to be done under the supervision of the Board of Public 
Works, and no work to be started until approved by the 
Board of Selectmen, the Finance Committee, and the Board 
of Public Works. 

Article 21. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate or transfer from unappropriated available funds 
in the treasury a sum of money for Chapter 90 Highway 
Maintenance, or take any action in relation thereto. 

23 



Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $3000.00 for Chapter 90 Highway- 
Maintenance, or take any action in relation thereto. 

Article 22. — To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to purchase three sand spreaders, and raise 
and appropriate the amount of $1595.00 therefor. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 22 as read. 

Article 23. — To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to purchase one snow Loader, and raise 
and appropriate the amount of $12000.00 therefor. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to authorize 
the Board of Public Works to purchase one snow loader, and 
raise and appropriate the amount of $11000.00 therefor. 

Article 2U> — To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to purchase a street sweeping machine, and 
turn in the present 1946 machine as partial payment, and 
raise and appropriate the amount of $9700.00 for the balance 
of payment. i 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 24 as read. 

Article 25. — To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to purchase a pickup truck for Water De- 
partment use, and turn in present 1946 Dodge truck as 
partial payment, and raise and appropriate the amount of 
$1300.00 for the balance of payment. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 25 as read. 

Article 26. — To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to purchase a rubber tired tractor with 
Frame and bucket, and turn in the present tractor as partial 
payment, and raise and appropriate the amount of $925.00 
for the balance of payment. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 26 as read. 

24 



Article 27. — To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to purchase an automobile and raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1600.00 therefor, and the price 
allowed for a 1946 Plymouth Coupe, known as the superin- 
tendent's car, be used as part payment for the new automo- 
bile. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 27 as read. 

Article 28. — To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the amount of $4000.00 for purpose of widening 
a portion of Whittier Street near the school property, and for 
constructing additional access roadway to the school par- 
king area, on petition of the Board of Public Works. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 28 as read. 

Article 29. — To see if the town will vote to purchase a 
parcel of land on Greenwood Road necessary to permit the 
widening and relocation of said road near High Plain Road, 
Said parcel being owned by Elmer O. and Betty S. Peterson 
and is shown on a plan on file at the office of the Town Clerk ; 
and grade said portion of relocated road, and raise and ap- 
propriate the amount of $200.00 for said land acquisition 
and construction work, on petition of the Board of Public 
Works. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 29 as read. 

Article 30. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the amount of $750.00 for the purpose of con- 
structing and maintaining baseball diamonds at the Play- 
stead, and for the purchase of related materials ; all for use 
of the so-called Little League and all work to be performed 
under the supervision of the Board of Public Works ; on pe- 
tition of the Board of Public Works. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to raise and 
appropriate the amount of $750.00 for the purpose of con- 
structing and maintaining baseball diamonds at the Play- 

25 



stead, and for the purchase of related materials ; all for the 
use of the younger children of our Town and all work to be 
performed by and under the supervision of the Board of 
Public Works. 

Article 31. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate, or transfer from available funds, the sum of 
$80000.00 to engineer and construct a sewerage system in 
Ballardvale, and to construct a complete sewage treatment 
plant, including all apparatus, appurtenances and appro- 
aches, and authorize the Selectmen to secure land and rights 
of way for this purpose by purchase or by right of eminent 
domain, on petition of Special Committee on Water and 
Sewerage. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that $40,000 
be transferred from available funds and that the Town raise 
and appropriate $40,000 to engineer and construct a sewer- 
age system in Ballardvale and a complete sewage treatment 
plant with all apparatus, appurtenances and approaches, all 
under the supervision of the Board of Public Works ; that no 
construction be started until approved by a majority of the 
Selectmen, the Board of Health, and the Finance Committee ; 
and that the Selectmen be authorized to secure land and 
rights of way for this purpose by purchase or by right of 
eminent domain. 

Article 32. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $2500.00 to be expended under the su- 
pervision of the Board of Public Works, for the purpose of 
extending and improving the sewerage system of the Town 
of Andover, no work to be started until approved by the 
Board of Health, the Finance Committee, and the Board of 
Public Works, on petition of Special Committee on Water 
and Sewerage. 

Article 32. was withdrawn from the warrant. 

Article 33. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $500.00 to be expended for engineering 

26 



study, advice, and similar purposes, under the direction of 
and on petition of the Special Committee on Water and 
Sewerage. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $200.00 to be expended for engineer- 
ing study, advice, and similar purposes, under the direction 
of the Special Committee on Water and Sewerage. 

Article 34. — To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Public Works to extend the sewer easterly in Sum- 
mer Street for a distance of about 1208 feet from the pre- 
sent end opposite 135 Summer Street, and raise and ap- 
propriate the amount of $6150.00 therefor; on petition of 
the Board of Health with the endorsement of the Board of 
Public Works. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept Ar- 
ticle 34 as read. 

Article 35. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the amount of $1275.00 for the purpose of ex- 
tending the existing storm drain in William Street westerly 
for a distance of about 380 lineal feet ; on petition of Sebas- 
tiano Magnano and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 35 as read. 

* Article 36. — To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to extend the present 10" water main on 
Bailey Road a distance of about 1200 feet from the existing 
dead end, and raise and appropriate the amount of $11200.00 
therefor, on petition of Allan Young and others. 

Article 36 was defeated. 

Article 37. — To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to extend the water main from the corner 
of River Road and Brundrett Avenue along Brundrett 
Avenue northerly for a distance of about 1600 feet to the 
property of Jacob Schlakis, and raise and appropriate the 
amount of $6400.00 therefor, on petition of Jacob Schlakis 

27 



and others. 

Article 37 was defeated. Yes 163, No 258 

Article 38. — To see if the town will authorize the Board 
of Public Works to extend the water line on Salem Street a 
distance of about 3550 feet from the property owned by 
Fred A. Gould to a point opposite the Conway property at 
the corner of Jenkins Road and Salem Street, and raise and 
appropriate the amount of $21009.00 therefor, on petition 
of John J. Conway and others. 

Article 38 was withdrawn from the warrant. 

Article 39. — to see if the town will vote to authorize the 
School Committee to continue to maintain State-Aided Vo- 
cational Education in accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 74, General Laws, and Acts amendatory thereto, or 
dependent thereon, and further raise and appropriate the 
sum of $1700.00 therefor. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 39 as read. 

Article 40. — To see if the town will authorize the Mod- 
erator to appoint a school housing planning committee, this 
committee to investigate school housing conditions and to 
formulate long-range school building plans, and appropriate 
the sum of $1000.00 therefor. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 40 as read. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to take up 
Articles 63 and 64 which may be found in regular order in 
the Town Meeting records. 

Article 41. — To see if the town will vote to increase the 
School Committee membership from the present five mem- 
bers to nine members in the following manner : 

By electing three members to the Committee instead of 
only one member at the annual 1954 election, and by electing 
three members to the Committee instead of two at the annual 
1955 election, and by electing three members to the Com- 

28 



mittee instead of two at the annual 1956 election, thereby 
making it a Committee of nine following the 1956 election, 
on petition of Helen E. Jolliffe and others. 
Article 41 was defeated. 

Article 42. — To see if the town will vote to name the 
new West Andover Elementary School the "Thomas Edward 
Carter Elementary School' ' in honor of the late Lt. Thomas 
E. Carter, World War I veteran, killed in action November 
4, 1918 at Latuilerie Ferme, France, on petition of Arthur 
R. Lewis and others. 

Article 42 was withdrawn from the warrant. 

Article 43. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $600.00 to improve and resurface a 
portion of Central Playground for year round recreational 
purposes, this money to be expended in conjunction with the 
$2300.00 appropriated in 1950 and under the supervision of 
the Board of Public Works and the Committee on Recreation. 

Article 43 was defeated. 

Article 44. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $450.00 for the purpose of purchasing a 
new rotary power mower for Spring Grove Cemetery to re- 
place a mower sixteen years old. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 44 as read. 

Article 45. — To see if the town will vote to make the tree 
department and the moth department divisions of the de- 
partment of public works, to be consolidated with and into 
that department, and to instruct the selectmen to take the 
necessary steps for that consolidation so that final action 
may be taken at the 1954 Annual Town Meeting. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 45 as read. 

Article 46. — To see if the town will vote to change the 
name of a section of Chandler Road, beginning at Lowell 

29 



Street, opposite Lincoln Street, and running westerly to a 
point known as the dead end circle and accept the name 
Chandler Circle in order that it may be indentified from the 
section of Chandler Road which begins on the westerly side 
of Beacon Street and continues to run westerly to River 
Road, on petition of George C. S. Williams and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 46 as read. 

Article 47. — To see if the town will vote to accept as a 
public way and name Beech Circle, as approved by the 
Board of Survey and laid out by the Board of Selectmen. 
Said way being shown on a plan entitled, "Beech Circle" 
Andover, Mass. dated November 1952 and drawn by Ralph 
B. Brasseur C. E. of Haverhill, Mass. This plan being now on 
file in the office of the Town Clerk, on petition of James L. 
Handley and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 47 as read. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to consider 
Articles 48, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55 and 56 together and referred 
to next special or regular Town Meeting. 

Article 48. — To see if the town will vote to accept as a 
public way and name Cassimere Street as approved by the 
Board of Survey, laid out by the Board of Selectmen, and 
shown on a plan entitled Subdivision and Acceptance Plan 
of Cassimere Street dated December, 1952, Clinton F. Good- 
win, Registered Professional Engineer, Haverhill, Mass. 
Both plan and description referred to being on file at the 
office of the Town Clerk, on petition of David L. Markert 
and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to refer 
Article 48 to the next special or regular Town Meeting. 

Article 49. — To see if the town will vote to accept as a 
public way, and name Forbes Lane, a distance of 960 feet, 
together with a portion of Karlton Circle extending from 
the end of Forbes Lane to Porter Road a distance of 432 ft ; 

30 



same being approved by the Board of Survey and laid out by 
the Board of Selectmen, as shown on a plan entitled "Accept- 
ance plan of Karlton Field, Andover, Mass." ; dated June, 
1952 same plan being made by Fred W. Stowers, Civil En- 
gineer of Methuen, Mass. Both plan and description referred 
to being on file at the office of the Town Clerk and in the 
Registry of Deeds of Essex County, on petition of Karl C. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept as a 
public way, and name Forbes Lane, a distance of 350 feet, 
westerly from Hidden Road as shown on a plan entitled 
"Acceptance plan of Karlton Field, Andover, Mass." ; dated 
June, 1952 same plan being made by Fred W. Stowers, Civil 
Engineer of Methuen, Mass. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to refer the 
balance of Article 49 to the next special or regular Town 
Meeting. 

Article 50. — To see if the town will vote to accept as a 
public way and name Judson Road, as approved by the Board 
of Survey and laid out by the Board of Selectmen, as shown 
on a plan entitled "Subdivision and Acceptance Plan" owner 
Trustees of Phillips Academy, Clinton F. Goodwin, Engineer 
dated January, 1952, both plan and description referred to 
being on file at the office of the Town Clerk, on petition of 
William T. Rich III and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 50 as read. 

Article 51. — To see if the town will vote to accept as a 
public way and name Linwood Street, the private way forty 
feet in width shown as Linwood Street on a plan entitled : 
"Acceptance Plan of Proposed Linwood Street, Fred W. 
Stowers, Reg. Surveyor, dated November 1951" recorded 
with North Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 2510, said 
Street extending Southerly from Haverhill Street about six 
hundred (600) feet and thence ruinning Easterly 
about eight hundred (800) feet to Dufton Road 
Extension, and accept as a public way and name Enmore 
Avenue the way running Westerly from the mid-portion of 

31 



said Linwood Street to Enmore Street, as shown on said 
plan, having a width of fifty feet and a length of about two 
hundred feet." The plan for both the above streets approved 
by the Board of Survey, laid out by the Board of Selectmen 
and on file at the office of the Town Clerk. This article on 
petition of Grace B. Peters and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to refer 
Article 51 to the next special or regular Town Meeting 

Article 52. — To see if the town will vote to accept as a 
public way and name Lockway Road from Carmel Road 
northerly to Walnut Avenue as shown on a plan entitled 
Street Acceptance Plan made December 1952 by Clinton F. 
Goodwin, Engineer, Haverhill, Mass. as approved by the 
Board of Survey and laid out by the Board of Selectmen. 
Both the plan and description referred to being on file at 
the office of the Town Clerk, on petition of Phillips B. Mars- 
den, Jr. and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to refer 
Article 52 to the next special or regular Town Meeting. 

Article 53. — To see if the town will vote to accept as a 
public way and name Shirley Road, as approved April 4, 
1952 by the Board of Survey, as laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen, as shown on a plan entitled Acceptance Plan for 
Shirley Road, Andover, Mass. made by Charles Cyr, Civil 
Engineer, Lawrence, Mass. Both plan and description re- 
ferred to being on file at the office of the Town Clerk, on 
petition of Carl H. Stevens and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to refer 
Article 53 to the next special or regular Town Meeting. 

Article 54. — to see if the town will vote to accept an ex- 
tension of Sutherland Street, from the present terminus, 
northwesterly thereof, as a public way, for a distance of five 
hundred and five linear feet, as approved by the Board of 
Survey and laid out by the Board of Selectmen and shown 
on a plan filed with the Town Clerk, entitled "Plan of Su- 
therland Street Extension, Andover, Massachusetts, for 

32 






Acceptance" dated December, 1952, Herbert W. Parthun, 
Civil Engineer, on petition of Lillian E. Howe and others. 
Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to refer 
Article 54 to the next special or regular Town Meeting. 

Article 55. — To see if the town will vote to accept as a 
public way, and name Theodore Ave. for 500 feet, as ap- 
proved by the Board of Survey, and laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen, as shown on a plan entitled Sub-division, and 
Acceptance Plan-Shawsheen Highlands, made August 19, 
1952 by Ralph Brasseur, Engineer, Haverhill, Mass. Both 
plans and descriptions referred to being on file at the Town 
Clerk's Office on petition of George R. Cairns and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to refer 
Article 55 to the next special or regular Town Meeting. 

Article 56. — To see if the town will vote to accept as a 
public way and name Alden Road, as approved by the Board 
of Survey and laid out by the Board of Selectmen, as shown 
on the plan entitled "Sub-division and Acceptance Plan for 
Hidden Acres" made on January, 1947, by Clinton F. Good- 
win, both plan and description referred to being on file at 
the Town Clerk's Office, on petition of Johnston Bird and 
others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to refer 
Article 56 to the next special or regular Town Meeting. 

Article 57. — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate a certain amount of money for the purpose of 
surfacing and improving Alden Road, all work to be done 
under the supervision of the Board of Public Works; on 
petition of Johnston Bird and others. 

Article 57 was withdrawn from the warrant. 

Article 58. — To see if the Town will accept from J. P. 
Stevens & Co., Inc. a deed of a triangular parcel of land si- 
tuated on the northerly side of Stevens Street in Andover, 
bounded and described as follows : 

Bginning at the most easterly corner thereof at a drill 

33 



hole in the sidewalk in the northerly line of Stevens Street 
as laid out in February 1885, said drill hole being located 
10.50' southwesterly from a drill hole in the concrete side- 
walk marking the intersection of the northerly line of Ste- 
vens Street with the westerly line of North Main Street; 
thence N. 66°-07'W by the said northerly line of Stevens 
Street 113.30' to a spike in the pavement at land of the 
grantor; thence turning and running N. 49°-59'-30" E by 
said land of the grantor 58.40' to an iron pipe marking an 
angle in said line; thence turning and running N. 81°-51' E. 
still by remaining land of the grantor and point of beginning 

The above parcel as described contains 917 sq. ft. be the 
same more or less. 

Said parcel being triangular in shape and is shown on a 
plan entitled, "Plan of Land in Andover, Mass. to accompany 
deed from M.T. Stevens & Sons Co. to the Town of Andover", 
Scale l"-20', dated December 1952 as made by Clinton F. 
Goodwin, Registered Professional Engineer, Haverhill, 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 58 as read. 

Article 59. — To see if the town will vote to accept Chapter 
40, Section 6A of the General Laws which provides that a 
town may appropriate annually a sum not exceeding one 
two-hundredths of one percent of the assessed valuation of 
the preceding year for the purpose of advertising its re- 
sources, advantages and attractions, and, as provided under 
said section, to appropriate, or transfer from available 
funds, the sum of $900.00 dollars to be expended by the 
Andover Board of Trade for Christmas Lighting and par- 
ticipation in the publicity program of the Essex County 
Boards of Trade, on petition of the Andover Board of Trade 
and others. 

Article 59 was withdrawn from the warrant. 

Article 60. — To see if the town will instruct the Modera- 
tor to appoint a committee of five to study the advisability 
of fluoridation of the water supply to help control tooth de- 
cay in children, a report to be submitted to the next annual 

34 



town meeting, on petition of David L. Darling and others. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 60 as read. 

Article 61. — To see if the town will vote to authorize and 
empower the town treasurer of the Town of Andover to im- 
print his fascimile signature to and upon any and all notes, 
drafts, checks, orders for the payment of moneys and any 
and all other instruments in writing required to be signed 
and endorsed by said town treasurer, and direct that the 
facsimile signature of the said town treasurer shall have the 
same effect and validity thereon as the written signature of 
the said town treasurer, on petition of Thaxter Eaton and 
others. 

Article 61 was withdrawn from the warrant. 

Article 62. — To see if the town will vote to accept $4308. 
00 received in 1952 for the perpetual care of lots in Spring 
Grove Cemetery, $100.00 for a flower fund, and the Kate 
Adams Swift fund of $300.00 for the use of Memorial Hall 
Library, on petition of Thaxter Eaton, Treasurer. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 62 as read. 

Article 63. — To see if the town will vote to transfer $20, 
000 from Overlay Reserve to the Reserve Fund. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 63 as read. 

Article 64. — To see if the town will vote to permit the 
Assessors to use $60,000.00 free cash to reduce the 1953 tax 
rate and to offset appropriations for capital outlay voted at 
the 1953 town meeting. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
Article 64 as read. 

Article 65. — To determine what disposition shall be made 

of unexpended appropriations and free cash in the treasury. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED that all un- 

35 



expended appropriations be turned into the treasury, except 
the following: 

Police Department $ 2800.00 

Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital 349.42 

Article 19, 1945 Special Sewer Committee Study 486.07 

Board of Public Works Machinery Account 4571.07 

Article 19, 1952, Improvement Beacon St. 963.63 

Article 41, 1952, Grading Canterbury St. 1500.00 

Disability Assistance-Federal Grants 448.46 

Disability Assistance Adm.-Federal Grants 11.47 

Aid to Dependent Children-Federal Grants 7.36 

Old Age Assistance-Federal Grants 1029.16 

Old Age Assistance Adm.-Federal Grants 405.92 

Article 1, 1950, School Construction 31875.50 

Civil Defense 1734.38 
Article 2, 1951 Special Town Meeting-Land 

Purchase 3188.15 

Article 8, 1946 History of Andover 1800.00 

Article 12, 1952, Shaw Property-Parking Lot 6960.88 

Article 22, 1944, Plan for Shaw Property 2500.00 
Article 29, 1952, Improve and Resurface Central 

Playground " 2300.00 

Article 22, 1951, Enclosing Rogers Brook 795.13 

Article 1, 1950, Supplementary Warrant 1131.87 

Article 18, 1952-16" Low Service Force Main 4704.69 
Article 23, 1952, Extending and Improving Water 

System 3678.77 



Article 66. — To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to accept 
the report of the Town Officers and place on file. 



Article 67. — To transact any other business that may 
legally come before the meeting. 

Upon motion duly seconded, it was VOTED to adjourn at 
11:50 P. M. 



36 



APPOINTMENTS BY THE MODERATOR 



Finance Committee 

Louis E. Gleason, Chairman 

Leo F. Daly Charles W. Arnold Charles D. McDuffie 

Ernest L. Wilkinson Norman L. Miller 

William S. Titcomb, Secretary 



School Housing Planning Committee 

Gordon L. Colquhoun, Chairman 
Anna M. Greeley Vasco E. Nunez Edward I. Erickson 
Louis E. Gleason Howell M. Stillman 



Committee to Study the Advisability of Fluoridation 
of Water Supply to Help Tooth Decay in Children 

Dr. John C. Brown Dr. Charles H. Hollis Sidney P. White 
Dr. William V. Emmons Harold R. Rafton 



The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

Attest : 

George H. Winslow, Town Clerk 



37 



Report of the Town Clerk 



To the Board of Selectmen : 

I hereby submit my report for the office of the Town Clerk 
for the year 1953. 

The total number of registered voters in Andover at the 
close of registration July 1, 1953 was 7,668 by precincts as 
follows : 

1 1736 

2 1431 

3 1538 

4 901 

5 682 

6 1380 



7668 
VITAL STATISTICS 



Number of births recorded 




244 


Males 


126 




Females 


118 




Number of deaths recorded 




147 


Males 


67 




Females 


80 




Number of marriages 




123 


Respectfully submitted, 




George H. Winslow, 


Town Clerk 



38 



Report of the Director of Accounts 



March 3, 1953 

To the Board of Selectmen : 
Mr. Roy E. Hardy, Chairman 
Andover, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen : 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the books and 
accounts of the town of Andover for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1952 made in accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 44, General Laws. This is in the form of a report 
made to me by Mr. Herman B. Dine, Assistant Director of 
Accounts. 

Very truly yours, 
Francis X. Lang 

Director of Accounts 



Mr. Francis X. Lang 

Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

State House, Boston 

Sir: 

As directed by you, I have made an audit of the books and 
accounts of the town of Andover for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1952 and submit the following report thereon : 

The financial transactions as recorded on the books of the 
several departments collecting or disbursing money for the 
town or committing bills for collection were examined, 
checked, and verified. 

39 



The books and accounts of the town accountant were ex- 
amined. The ledger accounts were analyzed, the receipts as 
recorded were checked with the treasurer's record of re- 
ceipts, the payments were compared with the treasury war- 
rants approved by the board of selectmen, and the appropri- 
ation accounts were checked with the appropriations and 
transfers voted by the town as listed from the town clerk's 
record of town meetings. The ledger record of departmental 
accounts receivable was checked with the records of the 
several departments committing the bills and with the 
treasurer's books, and a balance sheet, which is appended 
to this report, was prepared showing the financial condition 
of the town on December 31, 1952. 

The books and accounts of the town treasurer were ex- 
amined. The recorded receipts were analyzed and checked 
with the records of the departments making payments to the 
treasurer and with the other sources from which money was 
paid into the town treasury. The expenditures were com- 
pared with the treasury warrants approved by the board of 
selectmen and with the accountant's records, and the cash 
balance on December 31, 1952 was proved by reconciliation 
of the bank balances with statements furnished by the banks 
of deposit, by an acknowledgement by a bank of the treasury 
bills in its custody, and by actual count of the cash in the 
office. 

The payments on account of debt and interest were proved 
by comparison with the amounts of debt maturing and with 
the cancelled securities and coupons on file. 

The savings bank books and securities representing the 
investment of the trust and investment funds in the custody 
of the town treasurer were examined and listed, the income 
being proved and the payments to the town being verified. 

The municipal contributory retirement funds in the cus- 
tody of the town treasurer were examined. The retirement 
ledger accounts were analyzed, the receipts as recorded were 
checked with the appropriations voted by the town, with 
the deductions from the salaries and wages of the members, 
and with the interest earned on invested funds. The pay- 
ments were compared with the treasury warrants approved 

40 



by the retirement board, and the balance of the funds on 
December 31, 1952 was proved by examination of the securi- 
ties and by reconciliation of the bank balance with a state- 
ment received from the bank. 

The deductions from employees' salaries for federal taxes, 
for the purchase of savings bonds, and for Blue Cross and 
Blue Shield were listed and reconciled with the amounts due 
and paid to the Federal Government, and to the Massachu- 
setts Hospital Service, Inc. 

The records of tax titles held by the town were examined 
The tax title register was analyzed and checked with the 
colector's and the treasurer's accounts and with the records 
at the Registry of Deeds. 

The transactions of the several trust funds in the custody 
of the treasurers of the John Cornell, Punchard Free School, 
and Memorial Hall Library funds were verified, and the se- 
curities and savings bank books representing the investment 
of these funds were examined and listed. 

The books and accounts in the tax collector's office were 
examined and checked. The taxes, excise, and assessments 
outstanding at the time of the previous audit and all subse- 
quent commitments were audited and compared with the 
assessor's warrants. The cash receipts as posted in the com- 
mitment books were compared with the cash book record of 
collections, the abatements were compared with the asses- 
sor's record of abatements granted, the payments to the 
treasurer were verified, and the outstanding accounts were 
listed and proved with the control accounts in the account- 
ant's ledger. 

The town clerk's records of sporting, dog, and town 
licenses, as well as of permits, recording fees, etc., were ex- 
amined and checked. The payments to the Division of 
Fisheries and Game were verified by comparison with the 
receipts on file, and the payments to the town treasurer 
were compared with the treasurer's cash book. 

The surety bonds of the officials required by law to furnish 
them were examined and found to be in proper form. 

The records of departmental accounts receivable were ex- 
amined. The payments to the treasurer were verified, the 

41 



abatments were checked, and the outstanding accounts 
were listed and reconciled with the accountant's ledger ac- 
counts. 

The books and accounts of the public works department 
were examined. The records of water and sewer charges 
were examined and checked. The recorded collections were 
compared with the payments to the treasurer, the abate- 
ments as recorded were verified, and the outstanding ac- 
counts were listed and reconciled with the accountant's led- 
ger accounts. 

Verification of the outstanding tax, excise, assessment, de- 
partmental, and water accounts was made by sending notices 
to a number of persons whose names appeared on the books 
as owing money to the town, and from the replies received 
it appears that the accounts, as listed, are correct. 

The records of cash receipts of the saler of weights and 
measures, of the inspectors of buildings, wires, and plumb- 
ing, of the health, police, town scales, school, and library de- 
partments, and of all other departments wherein money is 
collected for the town were examined and checked, the pay- 
ments to the treasurer and the cash on hand being verified. 

Appended to this report in addition to the balance sheet, 
are tables showing a reconciliation of the treasurer's cash 
summaries of the tax, excise, assessment, tax title, depart- 
mental, and water accounts, as well as tables showing the 
condition and transactions of the trust, investment, and 
municipal contributory retiremnt funds. 

For the cooperation extended by the several town officials 
during the audit, I wish, on behalf of my assistants and for 
myself, to express appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Herman B. Dine, 

Assistant Director of Accounts 



42 



Report of the 
Town Accountant 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1953 



To the Board of Selectmen, 
Andover, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

In accordance with Chapter 41, Section 61, of the General 
Laws, I submit herewith my anuual report for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1953. 

A detailed statement of the receipts and their sources, and 
of the payments and the purposes therefor, follows. The 
condition of the various trust funds, as well as the Town of 
Andover Retirement Fund, sources of incomes and the 
amounts paid out are also set forth. A statement of the tem- 
porary loans, maturing debt and interest is included. 

A balance sheet, which is appended to this report, was 
prepared showing the assets and liabilities as of December, 
31, 1953. 

The State Accountants have complied with statutes and 
audited the Town books for the year ending December 31, 
1952. They are expected in the near future to audit the 
Town's accounts for 1953. 

May I express my thanks for the co-operation accorded to 
me by your Board, as well as by each Town Department dur- 
ing the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George C. Napier, Town Accountant 



43 



Appropriations for 1953 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1953 
TOWN MEETING, MARCH 9, 1953 

General Government $ 55,691.00 

Protection of Persons & Property 208,515.00 

Health and Sanitation 86,378.04 

Highways 165,795.00 

Charities and Soldiers' Benefits 143,050.00 

Schools and Libraries 537,217.58 

Recreation and Unclassified 88,219.25 

Enterprises and Cemeteries 81,429.00 

Interest and Maturing Debt 90,406.25 



Total Appropriations, March 9, 1953 $1,456,701.12 



Receipts for 1953 



TAXES 



Current Year: 

Real Estate $ 799,398.65 

Personal Property 109,587.30 

Poll 7,186.00 

Loss of Taxes — State 1,331.09 



Previous Years: 




Real Estate 


46,231.11 


Personal Property 


5,454.50 


Poll 


28.00 


Estate of Deceased Persons 


1,124.30 


Tax Title Redemptions 


172.03 


Andover Housing Authority 


1,226.40 



$ 917,503.04 



54,236.34 
Amount Carried Forward $ 971,739.38 



44 



Amount Brought Forward $ 971,739.38 



From the State : 

Corporation Taxes 138,341.35 

Income Taxes 110,790.55 



$ 249,131.90 
$1,220,871.28 



LICENSES AND PERMITS 

Selectmen 7,983.50 

Town Clerk 1,084.00 

Police Department 50.00 

Hawkers' and Pedlers' Licenses - State 126.00 
Health Department 587.00 

Board of Appeals 24.00 



$ 9,854.50 



FINES AND FORFEITS 

Police Court $ 673.40 

GRANTS AND GIFTS 

From the Federal Government : 

Old Age Assistance - Admin. $ 1,956.47 
Old Age Assistance - Aid 58,582.02 

Aid to Dependent Children - Admin. 235.28 
Aid to Dependent Children - Aid 8,546.39 
Disability Assistance - Admin. 205.30 

Disability Assistance - Aid 3,668.38 

School Cafeterias - Subsidy 8,496.10 

School Milk - Subsidy 356.94 

$ 82,046.88 



From Commonwealth of Massachusetts : 
Meals Tax for Old Age Assistance 3,007.58 
Vocational Education 824.54 

High School Transportation 5,899.02 

School Construction 36,597.98 



$ 46,329.12 



Amount Carried Forward $1,359,775.18 

45 



Amount Brought Forward $1,359,775.18 

From County of Essex : 

Dog Licenses - 1952 2,139.03 

Chapter 90 - Highway Maintenance 667.00 



$ 2,806.03 
$ 131,182.03 



PRIVILEGES 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise Taxes : 
Current Year $ 107,433.96 

Prior Years 13,740.16 



$ 121,174.12 

Parking Meter Fees 11,210.33 



$ 132,384.45 



SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS 

Sewer Assessments 1953 ? 1,312.27 

Sewer Assessments 1952 315.15 

Sewer Unapportioned Asses, 1953 4,083.19 
Sewer Unapportioned Asses. 1949 498.00 
Sewer Unapportioned Asses. Not Due 255.79 
Sewer Asses. Paid in Advance 1,995.13 



$ 8,459.53 

Classified Forest Land 1953 5.72 



General Government: 

Commission on Public Tele. $ 98.48 

Rent of Town Property 1,732.50 



$ 8,465.25 



$ 1,830.98 



Treasurer : 

Historical Booklets $ .40 

Unidentified Cash 8.36 

Tailings 3.88 

$ 12.64 

Amount Carried Forward $1,505,274.53 

46 



Amount Brought Forward $1,505,274.53 

Tax Collector: 

Certificates of Municipal Liens $ 352.00 



$ 2,195.62 



Protection of Persons and Property 
Police Department: 

Auction Sale of Equip. $ 159.00 

Sale of Junk 3.25 



Health and Sanitation : 

Sewer Connections $ 68.00 

Tuberculosis Subsidy - State 1,053.57 



Highways: 

Sale of Junk $ 22.48 

Snow Removal - State 138.00 



162.25 



Fire Department: 

Use of Ambulance $ 336.00 

Auction Sale of Pumper 250.00 

Oil Burner Permits 131.50 

Sale of Junk 3.20 

$ 720.70 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 237.55 

Building Inspector's Fees 2,689.00 

Wire Inspector's Fees 560.00 

Public Weigher's Fees 53.50 

Supervision of Tree Trimming - Tree Warden 870.00 



$ 5,293.00 



1,121.57 



$ 160.48 



Infirmary : 

Board and Care $ 1,260.90 

Amount Carried Forward $1,513,462.48 

47 



Amount Brought Forward 






Charities : 






Reimbursements For : 






General Relief: 






State 


$ 


60.00 


Cities and Towns 




53.90 


Individuals 




10.00 


Old Age Assistance : 






State 


$ 


41,267.49 


Cities and Towns 




1,806.00 


Individuals Recoveries 




10,720.27 



$1,513,462.48 



123.90 



$ 53,793.76 
Aid to Dependent Children : 

State $ 6,439.33 

Disability Assistance: 



State - Administration 


$ 


102.64 






State - Aid 




3,749.54 


? 


3,852.18 










$ 


64,209.17 


Veterans Benefits: 










State 






$ 


6,161.07 


Veterans Service: 










Photostatic Copies 


$ 


9.25 






From Individual 




15.00 


$ 










24.25 


Schools : 










Tuition — State Wards 


$ 


1,439.88 






Smith-Hughes George Barden Fund 42.32 






Other Tuition — 










Towns and Individuals 




7,900.50 






School Cafeterias 




40,173.04 






Punchard A. A. 




4,517.45 






Rental and Other 




373.93 







$ 54,447.12 
Amount Carried Forward $1,638,304.09 

48 



Amount Brought Forward $1,638,304.09 

Libraries : 

Fines, Sales and Damage to Books 1,724.43 
Income from Investments 2,800.00 



$ 4,524.43 



Public Services Enterprises: 

Water Department: 

Metered Rates 75,077.42 

Services 685.45 

Damages, Pumping Station Motor 942.48 



Unidentified Cash 


177.62 






Hydrant Service 


35.64 






Boat Plates 


20.50 






Water Liens Added to Taxes 


867.22 






Miscellaneous 


2.55 


$ 








77,808.88 


Cemetery Department: 








Sale of Lots $ 


32.00 






Care of Lots 


387.00 






Perpetual Cares Withdrawals 


2,664.07 






Interments and Tomb 


2,093.00 






Foundations 


337.18 






Miscellaneous 


149.00 


$ 








5,662.25 


Interest : 








Taxes $ 


1,783.60 






Special Assessments 


93.60 






Committed Interest 


431.33 






Motor Vehicle & Trailer Ex. Taxes 182.14 






Tax Titles 


25.72 


$ 








2,516.39 


Amount Carried Forward 




$1,728,816.04 



49 



Amount Brought Forward 

Trust and Investment : 

Cemetery Perpetual Cares 
Income : 

Trust and Investments 

Agency : 

Dog Licenses for County $ 2,979.00 
Sewer Connection Deposits 1,345.00 
Withholding Taxes 100,351.80 
U. S. Savings Bonds 4,510.68 
Mass. Hosp. Service - Blue Cross 9,787.00 


$1 

$ 
$ 

? 

$ 
$ 

$ 

$1 
$ 
$2 


,728,816.04 

2,703.00 
1,980.05 

118,973.48 

1,800.00 

149.99 


Sale of Town Owned Real Estate 
Sale of Town Owned Land 

Refunds : 

General Departments $ 
Petty Cash and Other 


582.83 
365.73 


Total Receipts for 1953 
Cash on Hand, January 1, 1953 
Grand Total for 1953 




948.56 
,855,371.12 
510,111.66 

,365,482.78 



% 



Expenditures for 1953 



APPROPRIATION ACCOUNTS 



SELECTMEN 




Cr. 

Appropriation 




$ 3,600.00 


Dr. 

Salaries, Selectmen 

Clerks 
Office Maintenance and Other 


$ 2,000.00 

1,018.00 

454.78 




Balance to Revenue 


$ 3,472.78 
127.22 






$ 3,600.00 


$ 3,600.00 


ACCOUNTANT 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$ 5,692.00 


Dr. 






Salaries, Accountant 

Clerk 
Office Maintenance 


$ 3,884.73 

1,115.00 

392.59 




Balance To Revenue 


$ 5,392.32 
299.68 





$ 5,692.00 $ 5,692.00 
51 





TREASURER 






Cr. 






Appropriation 


Dr. 




$ 5,389.00 


Salary, Treasurer 




$ 3,895.00 




Wages, Clerks 




657.39 




Office Maintenance 




471.11 




Dues, Carfares 




26.70 




Surety Bond 




274.40 




Recording Tax Titles 




57.50 






$ 5,382.10 


Balance to Revenue 




6.90 





$ 5,389.00 $ 5,389.00 

TREASURER PARKING METERS 
Cr. 

Transfer from Parking Meters Account $ 300.00 

Dr. 
Wages, Parking Meters Clerks $ 255.29 

Balance to Parking Meters Account 44.71 





$ 300.00 


$ 300.00 


TAX COLLECTOR 




Cr. 

Appropriation 




$ 8,359.00 


Dr. 






Salaries, Tax Collector 


$ 3,995.00 




Clerk 


2,685.40 




Office Maintenance 


1,543.45 




Recording Tax Taking Deeds 


11.00 






$ 8,234.85 




Balance to Revenue 


124.15 





$ 8,359.00 $ 8,359.00 
52 





Cr. 






Appropriation 






$11,595.00 


Petty Cash Refund 


Dr. 




5.00 


Salaries, Assessors 




$ 1,200.00 




Clerks 




4,827.00 




Wages, Assistant Assessors 


800.00 




Engineering 




2,837.56 




Photostated Records of 


Deeds 


444.61 




Office Maintenance 




664.71 




Carfares, Dues, Etc. 




22.20 




Petty Cash Advance 




5.00 






$10,801.08 




Balance to Revei 


nue 


798.92 






$11,600.00 


$11,600.00 


Towr 






Cr. 






Appropriation 


Dr. 




$ 6,215.00 


Salaries, Town Clerk 




$ 3,995.00 




Clerks 




1,677.00 




Office Maintenance 




468.84 






$ 6,140.84 




Balance to Rever 


rue 


74.16 






$ 6,215.00 


$ 6,215.00 


ELECTION AN! 






Cr. 






Appropriation 






$ 4,405.00 


Transfer from Reserve Fund 




350.00 




Dr. 






Salary, Clerks 




$ 1,076.00 




Wages, Registrars 




156.00 




Assistant Registrars 


800.00 




Amount Carried Fortvard 




$ 2,032.00 


$ 4,755.00 



53 



Amount Brought Forward 


$ 2,032.00 


$ 4,755.00 


Election Officers 


666.00 




All Other 


405.81 




Street Lists 


456.00 




Printing and Advertising 


872.50 




Election Expenses 


130.86 




Office Maintenance 


133.85 








$ 


4,697.02 




Balance To Reserve Fund 


57.98 




$ 4,755.00 


$ 4,755.00 


MODERATOR 






Cr. 






Appropriation 




$ 30.00 


Dr. 






Moderator $ 


20.00 




Balance to Revenue 


10.00 





$ 30.00 $ 30.00 
FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 20.00 

Dr. 
Membership Dues $ 10.00 

Balance to Revenue 10.00 



$ 20.00 $ 20.00 
TOWN COUNSEL 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 750.00 

Dr. 
Salary $ 500.00 

Services 161.35 



$ 661.35 
Balance to Revenue 88.65 



54 



$ 750.00 $ 750.00 
/ 



PLANNING BOARD AND BOARD OF SURVEY 

Cr. 



Appropriation 




$ 


200.00 


Dr. 








Salary, Clerk 


$ 100.00 






Balance to Revenue 


100.00 








$ 200.00 


$ 


200.00 


BOARD OF APPEALS 






Cr. 








Appropriation 




? 


100.00 


Dr. 








Advertising Hearings 


$ 27.08 






Balance to Revenue 


72.92 








$ 100.00 


$ 


100.00 


MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS 






Cr. 








Appropriation 




$ 


9,336.00 


Dr. 








Salaries, Janitors 


$ 2,944.40 






Additional Janitorial Service 


55.25 






Labor, Tree Department and 








Board of Public Works 


112.54 






Fuel 


1,700.23 






Lawrence Electric Company 


733.94 






Repairs 


2,047.17 






Janitor's Supplies 


427.32 






Water Bills and All Other 


192.36 








$ 8,213.21 




Balance to Revenue 


1,122.79 







$ 9,336.00 $ 9,336.00 
55 



POLICE 1 


DEPART] 
Cr. 


MENT 




Balance from 1952 






$ 2,800.00 


Appropriation 






74,450.00 


Petty Cash Refund 






25.00 


Refund 






32.12 


^C O m T*1 t~\ Ct • 


Dr. 






oaiaries . 
Chief 




$ 2,754.00 




Patrolmen 




58,067.85 




Reserve Police, Clerk 




3,542.04 




Other Employees 




937.40 




Purchase New Car 




1,763.89 




Equipment Maintenance 




3,200.91 




Equipment for Men 




863.84 




Traffic Lights, Signs and 


Signals 


1,072.59 




Office Maintenance and All Other 


1,552.96 




Petty Cash Advance 




25.00 






$73,780.48 




Overlay Surplus 




1,036.11 




Balance to Revenue 


2,490.53 





$77,307.12 $77,307.12 

POLICE PARKING METERS MAINTENANCE 

Cr. 

Transfer from Parking Meters Receipts $ 4,300.00 

Dr. 
Salary, Police Officer $ 3,397.20 

Labor 445.50 

Maintenance 251.91 



$ 4,094.61 
Balance to Parking Meters 

Receipts 205.39 



$ 4,300.00 $ 4,300.00 



56 



ARTICLE 14.— POLICE DEPARTMENT— NEW 

AUTOMOBILE 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 750.00 

Dr. 
Purchase New Automobile $ 746.42 

Balance to 1954 3.58 



$ 750.00 $ 750.00 
ARTICLE 16.— TRAFFIC BOOTH— ELM SQUARE 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 4,000.00 

Dr. 
Labor, Traffic Count $ 63.40 

Balance to 1954 3,936.60 





$ 4,000.00 


$ 4,000.00 


FIRE DEPARTMENT 




Cr. 

Appropriation 




$94,025.00 


Dr. 






Salaries : 






Chief 


$ 4,424.30 




Fire Fighters 


69,836.57 




Call Men: 






Central 


4,005.83 




Ballardvale 


1,347.50 




Ambulance Assistance 


92.85 




Equipment 


3,080.78 




Equipment for Men 


847.85 




Maintenance and Repairs 


4,118.71 




Fuel 


1,454.66 




Lawrence Gas and Electric Company 590.33 




Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds 3,244.04 




Office Maintenance and All Other 


979.40 






$94,022.82 




Balance to Revenue 


2.18 





$94,025.00 $94,025.00 
57 



ARTICLE 17.— UTILITY TRUCK-FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 1,300.00 

Dr. 
Purchase Utility Truck $ 1,246.43 

Balance to 1954 53.57 







$ 1,300.00 


$ 


1,300.00 


FOREST FIRES 






Appropriation 

Salary, Forest Warden 
Wages, Fighting Fires 
Apparatus Maintenance 
All Other 


Cr. 
Dr. 

nue 


$ 225.00 

826.50 

684.95 

41.33 


$ 


1,800.00 


Balance to Reve 


$ 1,777.78 
22.22 






$ 1,800.00 


$ 


1,800.00 


DOG OFFICER 






Appropriation 
Salary, Dog Officer 


Cr. 
Dr. 


$ 225.00 


? 


225.00 



$ 225.00 $ 225.00 

ANIMAL INSPECTOR 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 350.00 

Dr. 
Salary, Animal Inspector § 325.00 

Balance to Revenue 25.00 



$ 350.00 $ 350.00 
58 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 2,355.00 

Dr. 

Salary, Building Inspector $ 1,820.00 

Use of Car and All Other 328.08 





$ 


2,148.08 


- 


Balance to Revenue 




206.92 






$ 


2,355.00 


$ 2,355.00 


WIRE INSPECTOR 




Cr. 

Appropriation 






$ 1,175.00 


Dr. 








Salary, Wire Inspector 


$ 


850.00 




Use of Car and All Other 




136.50 






$ 


986.50 




Balance to Revenue 




188.50 





$ 1,175.00 $ 1,175.00 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 760.00 

Dr. 
Salary, Sealer Weights & Measures $ 540.00 
Use of Car and All Other 188.17 



Balance 


to Revenue 

MOTH SUPPR 
Cr. 

Forward 


$ 


728.17 
31.83 




Appropriation 
Amount Carried 


ESSIC 


760.00 

»N 


$ 760.00 

$ 8,850.00 
$ 8,850.00 



59 



Balance Brought Forward $ 8,850.00 

Dr. 
Salary, Moth Superintendent $ 1,118.70 

Labor 5,420.08 

Insecticides, Hardware and Tools 1,085.77 
Gasoline, Oil and Truck Maintenance 793.39 
Office Maintenance and All Other 301.69 



$ 8,719.63 
Balance to Revenue 130.37 



$ 8,850.00 $ 8,850.00 

CONTROL DUTCH ELM DISEASE 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 8,400.00 

Dr. 

Salary, Superintendent $ 489.60 

Labor 4,892.08 

Insecticides 1,382.83 

Hardware and Tools 943.03 

Gasoline, Oil and Truck Maintenance 675.56 

All Other 14.40 





$ 8,397.50 




Balance to Revenue 2.50 






$ 8,400.00 


$ 8,400.00 


TREE WARDEN 






Cr. 




Appropriation 




$10,075.00 


Refund 


Dr. 


14.00 


Salary, Tree Warden 


$ 1,934.00 




Labor 


6,693.07 




Trees 


281.41 




Hardware and Tools 


572.78 




Gasoline, Oil and Truck Maintenance 375.78 





Amount Carried Forward $ 9,857.04 $10,089.00 

60 



Amount Brought Forward 


$ 9,857.04 


$10,089.00 


Office Maintenance and All Other 


231.38 






$10,088.42 




Balance to Revenue 


.58 






$10,089.00 


$10,089.00 


HEALTH DEPARTMENT 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$ 7,040.00 


Petty Cash Refund 




10.00 


Dr. 






Salaries, Board of Health 


$ 300.00 




Agent 


2,868.75 




Clerical Assistance 


317.50 




Petty Cash Advance 


10.00 




Office Maintenance 


203.38 




Agent, Use of Car 


395.80 




Contagious Diseases 


193.19 




Medical Care and Medicines 


153.46 




Vital Statistics 


12.50 




Plumbing Inspector 


1,067.00 




Dog Vaccinations 


328.91 




Baby Clinic 


429.63 




Milk Inspector, Salary and Expenses 319.19 






$ 6,599.31 




Balance to Revenue 


450.69 





$ 7,050.00 $ 7,050.00 

CARE AND TREATMENT OF TUBERCULAR PATIENTS 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 3,500.00 

Dr. 
Care and Treatment of Tubercular 

Patients $ 2,222.00 

Balance to Revenue 1,278.00 



$ 3,500.00 $ 3,500.00 
61 



ESSEX COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL 

Cr. 

Balance from 1952 $ 349.42 

Appropriation 19,838.04 

Dr. 

Essex County Tuberculosis Hospital $22,237.67 
Revenue 1953 349.42 





$22,587.09 




Balance to 1954 - Deficit 




2,399.63 




$22,587.09 


$22,587.09 


PUBLIC DUMP 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$ 1,500.00 


Dr. 






Salary, Keeper of Dump 


$ 1,295.00 


. 


Labor and Bulldozer 


203.56 






$ 1,498.56 




Balance to Revenue 


1.44 





$ 1,500.00 $ 1,500.00 

ARTICLE 12.— CHAIN LINK FENCE AT DUMP 

Cr. 

$ 1,000.00 



Appropriation 

Erection Chain Link Fence 
Labor 


Dr. 


$ 


907.32 
2.90 


Balance to 1954 


$ 


910.22 

89.78 



$ 1,000.00 $ 1,000.00 
62 



SEWER MAINTENANCE 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 7,150.00 

Dr. 

Labor $ 4,058.90 

Lawrence Gas and Electric Company 2,579.55 
Tools and Equipment 405.67 



$ 7,044.12 
Balance to Revenue 105.88 



$ 7,150.00 $ 7,150.00 

ARTICLE 19.— 1945— SEWER SPECIAL COMMITTEE 

STUDY 



Balance from 1952 


Cr. 




$ 486.07 


Engineering 
Balance to 1954 


Dr. 


$ 39.00 
447.07 






$ 486.07 


$ 48G 0? 


ARTICLE 31.— 


BALLARDVALE SEWER 


Appropriation 
Transfer from Surplus 


Cr. 

Revenue 




$40,000.00 
40,000.00 


Engineering 
All Other 


Dr. 


$ 7,874.09 
17.91 




Balance to 1954 


$ 7,892.00 
72,108.00 





$80,000.00 $80,000.00 
63 



ARTICLE 34.— SEWER EXTENSION— SUMMER STREET 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 6,150.00 



Dr. 




Labor 


$ 2,737.80 


Engineering 


225.00 


Pipe, Fittings and Manhole Covers 


1,052.61 


Tarvia, Sand and Gravel 


331.85 


Back-Hoe and Tractor Use 


1,132.00 


Blasting 


160.75 


All Other 


169.74 




$ 5,809.75 


Balance to 1954 


340.25 



$ 6,150.00 $ 6,150.00 



HIGHWAYS MAINTENANCE 
Cr. 



A npropriations 




$61,150.00 


Dr. 






Labor 


$34,473.43 




Pipe and Fittings 


441.48 




Tools and Equipment 


2,004.40 




Shovel Hire 


261.00 




Asphalt, Tarvia and Road Oil 


18,560.87 




Broken Stone, Gravel, Etc. 


2,627.30 




Use of Cars 


588.75 




Telephone and All Other 


111.08 






$59,068.31 




Balance to Revenue 


2,081.69 





$61,150.00 $61,150.00 
64 



TRUCKS, GARAGE AND REPAIR SHOP MAINTENANCE 

Cr. 

Appropriation $20,250.00 

Dr. 
Labor $ 6,015.51 

Gasoline, Oil and Truck Maintenance 7,360.04 
Tires and Tubes 2,471.75 

Equipment, Hardware and Tools 3,010.66 

Fuel Oil 661.90 

Lawrence Gas and Electric Company 464.69 
Telephone and All Other 233.88 



Balance to Revenue 


$20,218.43 
31.57 


$20,250.00 $20,250.00 
ARTICLE 19.— 1952— IMPROVEMENT BEACON STREET 

Cr. 

Balance from 1952 $ 963.63 

Dr. 
Labor $ 448.33 
Tar Patch and All Other 214.04 


Balance to 1954 


$ 


662.37 
301.26 



$ 963.63 $ 963.63 
ARTICLE 19.— REPAIR AND BUILD SIDEWALKS 

Cr. 



Appropriation 


Dr. 




$ 7,500.00 


Labor 




$ 3,032.06 




Tarvia, Cement and Gravel 




1,489.45 




Equipment 




214.44 






$ 4,735.95 




Balance to 1954 




2,764.05 





$ 7,500.00 $ 7,500.00 
65 



ARTICLE 21.— CHAPTER 90— HIGHWAYS 
MAINTENANCE 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 3,000.00 

Dr. 

Labor $ 924.03 

Tar Patch, Crushed Stone and Other 2,075.97 



$ 3,000.00 $ 3,000.00 

ARTICLE 22.— THREE SAND SPREADERS— B. P. W. 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 1,595.00 

Dr. 

Purchase Three Sand Spreaders $ 1,530.00 
Balance to 1954 65.00 



$ 1,595.00 $ 1,595.00 

ARTICLE 24.— STREET SWEEPER— B. P. W. 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 9,700.00 

Dr. 

Purchase Street Sweeper $ 8,574.60 

Balance to 1954 1,125.40 



$ 9,700.00 $ 9,700.00 

ARTICLE 26.— TRACTOR— B. P. W. 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 925.00 

Dr. 

Purchase Ford Tractor and Loader $ 925.00 



$ 925.00 $ 925.00 
66 



ARTICLE 27.— SUPERINTENDENTS AUTOMOBILE— 

B. P. W. 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 1,600.00 

Dr. 
Purchase Automobile $ 1,403.75 

Balance to 1954 196.25 



$ 1,600.00 $ 1,600.00 

ARTICLE 28.— WIDENING WHITTIER STREET 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 4,000.00 

Dr. 
Labor $ 1,847.23 

Tarvia 940.92 

Sand and Gravel 174.63 

Conduit Services 241.60 

Equipment, Range Oil and Shovel Hire 97.61 



$ 3,301.99 
Balance to 1954 698.01 



$ 4,000.00 $ 4,000.00 

ARTICLE 29.— GREENWOOD ROAD 

PURCHASE LAND AND CONSTRUCTION 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 200.00 

Dr. 
Purchase Land $ 100.00 

Land Acquisition Deed 6.50 

Blue Printing 2.00 



$ 108.50 
Balance to 1954 91.50 



$ 200.00 $ 200.00 



67 



ARTICLE 35.— STORM 


DRAIN- 
Cr. 


-WILLIAM STREET 


Appropriation 
Labor 


Dr. 


$ 1,275.00 
$ 412.22 


Pipe, Grates and Frames 




546.93 


Back Hoe and Other 




169.83 




$ 1,128.98 


Balance to 1954 




146.02 



$ 1,275.00 $ 1,275.00 
ARTICLE 41— GRADING— CANTERBURY STREET 

Cr. 

Balance from 1952 $ 1,500.00 

Dr. 



Labor 




$ 968.27 




Tar Patch 




201.86 




Shovel Hire 




270.00 






$ 1,440.13 




Balance to 1954 




59.87 






$ 1,500.00 


$ 1,500.00 


SNOW AND 


ICE 
Cr. 


REMOVAL 




Appropriation 


Dr. 




$17,000.00 


Labor 




$ 9,439.59 




Tools and Equipment 




1,275.11 




Salt 




2,040.00 




Sand 




272.03 




Snow Plowing 




2,138.13 




Weather Services and Other 




174.07 






$15,338.93 




Balance to Revenue 


1,661.07 





$17,000.00 $17,000.00 
68 



STREET LIGHTING 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$26,600.00 


Dr. 


• 




Street Lighting 


$24,603.13 




Balance to Revenue 


1,996.87 
$26,600.00 






$26,600.00 


PUBLIC WELFARE 




Cr. 






Appropriation 




$13,000.00 


Refund 




15.00 


Dr. 






Salaries, Board of Public Welfare 


$ 300.00 




Agent 


460.00 




Clerk 


398.40 




Groceries and Provisions 


661.30 




Cash Grants to Individuals 


2,470.50 




Medicine and Medical Attendance 


551.15 




State Institutions 


4,107.63 




Relief by Other Cities and Towns 


390.50 






$ 9,339.48 




Balance to Revenue 


3,675.52 
$13,015.00 






$13,015.00 


DISABILITY ASSISTANCE 




(TOWN) 






Cr. 






Appropriation 




$ 5,800.00 


Transfer from Reserve Fund 




500.00 


Refund 




45.00 


Dr. 






Administration : 






Salary, Agent 


$ 138.60 




Disability Assistance 


6,030.35 
$ 6,168.95 




Transfer to Reserve Fund 14.65 




Balance to Revenue 


161.40 






$ 6,345.00 


$ 6,345.00 



69 



DISABILITY ASSISTANCE 

(FEDERAL GRANTS) 

Cr. 

Balance from 1952 . $ 459.93 

Federal Grants Received in 1953 3,873.68 

Dr. 
Administration : 

Salary, Agent $ 153.90 

Disability Assistance 4,116.84 



$ 4,270.74 
Balance to 1954 62.87 







$ 


4,333.61 


$ 4,333.61 


AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN 






(TOWN) 










Cr. 








Appropriation 


Dr. 






$15,000.00 


Administration : 










Salaries, Agent 




$ 


342.19 




Clerk 






235.24 




Aid: 










Aid to Dependent Children 




9,506.29 





$10,083.72 
Balance to Revenue 4,916.28 



$15,000.00 $15,000.00 
AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN 
(FEDERAL GRANTS) 
Cr. 



Balance from 1952 






$ 7.36 


Federal Grants Received in 1953 






8,781.67 


Dr. 








Administration : 








Salaries, Agent 


$ 


131.56 




Clerk 




185.16 




Amount Carried Forward 


$ 


316.72 


$ 8,789.03 


70 









Amount Brought Forward 


$ 316.72 


$ 8,789.03 


Aid: 








Aid to Dependent C 


hildren 


8,472.31 

$ 8,789.03 






$ 8,789.03 


OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 




• 


(TOWN) 
Cr. 






Appropriation 






$76,000.00 


Refunds 


Dr. 




210.55 


Administration : 








Salaries, Agent 




$ 1,083.47 




Clerk 




694.08 




Office Maintenance 




170.02 




Aid: 








Old Age Assistance 




66,050.24 




Paid to Other Cities 


and Towns 


6,738.29 






$74,736.10 




Balance to Revenue 


1,474.45 





$76,210.55 $76,210.55 
OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 
(FEDERAL GRANTS) 
Cr. 

Balance from 1952 $ 1,435.08 

Federal Grants Received in 1953 60,538.49 

Recoveries 6,987.97 

Dr. 
Administration : 

Salaries, Agent $ 1,282.70 

Clerk 1,334.47 

Office Maintenance 242.60 

Aid: 

Old Age Assistance 63,703.02 



$66,562.79 
Balance to 1954 2,398.75 



$68,961.54 $68,961.54 



71 



INFIRMARY 
Cr. 

Appropriation $13,850.00 

Dr. 

Salary, Matron $ 1,753.00 

Other Employees 2,811.00 

Groceries and Provisions 3,191.72 

Dry Goods and Clothing 125.47 

Maintenance of Building 1,754.65 

Fuel 675.26 

Lawrence Gas and Electric Company 455.60 

Household Furnishings and Supplies 419.90 

Use of Car 197.15 

Medical Service and Medicine 224.68 

Telephone and All Other 273.48 



$11,881.91 
Balance to Revenue 1,968.09 





$13,850.00 


$13,850.00 


VETERANS SERVICE 




Cr. 

Appropriation 




$19,400.00 


Refund 




57.00 


Dr. 






Administration : 






Salaries, Agent 


$ 4,123.83 




Clerk 


2,530.00 




Clerk, Photostats 


86.75 




Office Maintenance 


676.59 




Veterans Benefits: 






Ordinary Allowances 


9,495.29 




Provisions, Rent and Clothing 


563.50 




Medical and Dental Services 


1,071.84 




Veterans Burial Allowance 


314.50 






$18,862.30 




Balance to Revenue 


594.70 





$19,457.00 $19,457.00 
72 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 






Cr. 






Appropriation 




$ 


498,690.00 


Transfer from Reserve Fund 




15,000.00 


Petty Cash Refund 






65.00 


Refunds 


Dr. 




85.98 


Salaries, Superintendents 


$ 


6,802.40 




Clerks 




9,138.74 




Truant Officer 




100.00 




Petty Cash Advance 




65.00 




Office Maintenance 




2,802.59 




Traveling Expenses 




1,356.49 




School Census 




150.00 




Teachers' Salaries: 








High 




84,282.48 




Elementary 




182,695.09 




Junior High 




68,364.75 




Text Books and Supplies : 








High 




9,410.65 




Elementary 




14,905.90 




Junior High 




4,493.07 




Tuition, High 




1,418.36 




Transportation : 








High 




7,960.72 




Elementary 




7,926.06 




Junior High 




7,910.24 




Janitor's Services: 








High 




12,051.02 




Elementary 




12,050.89 




Junior High 




12,055.93 




Fuel and Light: 








High 




5,232.02 




Elementary 




9,571.48 




Junior High 




5,067.45 





Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds : 

High 7,434.05 

Elementary and Junior High 19,572.95 
Amount Carried Fomvard $ 492,818.33 $ 513,840.98 

73 



Amount Brought Fomvard 


% 492,818.33 


Auxiliary Agencies: 




Health: 




High 


2,751.12 


Elementary 


2,636.21 


Junior High 


2,666.80 


Athletic : 




High 


4,378.75 


Junior High 


120.00 


Library : 




High 


52.12 


Junior High 


290.75 


Elementary 


5.50 



Lawrence Gas and Electric Company : 

High 2,551.93 

Elementary 2,802.80 

Junior High 2,551.92 

Studen Drivers' Car 167.77 






$ 513,794.00 
Balance to Reserve Fund 46.98 



$ 513,840.98 $ 513,840.98 

ARTICLE 39— ST ATE -AIDED- VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 1,700.00 

Dr. 

Teachers' Salaries % 1,434.00 

Other Employees 118.00 

Equipment 10.63 



$ 1,562.63 
Balance to 1954 137.37 



% 1,700.00 % 1,700.00 



74 



ARTICLE 1— SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION 


Cr. 

Balance from 1952 




$31,875.50 


Refunds 




26.93 


CENTRAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 




Dr. 






Walter L. Ritchie, Contractor 


$ 1,000.00 




Clerk of Works 


101.25 




Clerical Assistance 


88.50 




Paving Parking Area 


3,501.01 




Sidewalks 


218.88 




Furniture and Furnishings 


1,814.58 




Plumbing and Wiring 


400.00 




Janitor's Supplies 


116.39 




Office Supplies 


445.19 





$ 7,685.80 
WEST CENTER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Walter L. Ritchie, Contractor $ 432.32 

Furniture and Furnishings 733.46 

Projector 386.00 

Office Supplies 414.57 





$ 1,966.35 






$ 9,652.15 




Balance to 1954 


$22,250.28 
$31,902.43 






$31,902.43 


SCHOOL CAFETERIAS 




Cr. 






Balance from 1952 




$ 36.60 


Receipts in 1953 




47,984.14 


Petty Cash Refunds 




75.00 


Transfer from School Milk Fund 




747.24 


Dr. 






Salaries, Supervisors 


$ 5,540.00 


• 


Cafeteria Assistants 


11,451.50 




Amount Carried Fomvard 


$16,991.50 


$48,842.98 



75 



Amount Brought Forward $16,991.50 $48,842.98 

Groceries and Provisions 27,147.84 

Maintenance of Kitchens 4,275.74 

Petty Cash Advance 75.00 

Express, Telephone and Conventions 348.18 

$48,838.26 



Balance to 1954 


4.72 








$48,842.98 


$48,842.98 


SCHOOL MILK FUND 






Balance from 1952 




$ 


460.97 


Receipts in 1953 






1,042.44 


Dr. 








Purchase of Milk 


$756.17 






Tranfer to School Cafeterias Fund 


747.24 








$ 1,503.41 


$ 


1,503.41 


PUNCHARD ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 




dr. 

Balance from 1952 




$ 


179.13 


Receipts in 1953 






4,517.45 


Petty Cash Refund 






100.00 


Dr. 








Salary, Director of Athletics 


$ 150.00 






Services, Officials at Games 


270.00 






Equipment 


1,352.70 






Medical Supplies and Services 


386.35 






Police and Janitors' Services 


246.00 






Game Guarantees 


543.10 






Insurance 


500.00 






Transportation ,and Meals 


567.83 






Programs, Tickets and Ticket Selling 257.89 






Petty Cash Advance 


100.00 






Telephone and All Other 


175.02 







$ 4,548.89 
Balance to 1954 247.69 



$ 4,796.58 $ 4,796.58 
76 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 






Cr. 






Appropriation 






$35,827.58 


Dog Account Refund 






2,139.03 


Income from Investments 






2,800.00 


Refund 


Dr. 




1.25 


Salaries, Librarian 




$ 4,526.00 




Assistants 




16,447.10 




Treasurer 




100.00 




Janitors 




3,558.89 




Books and Periodicals 




7,967.98 




Binding 




867.21 




New Meeting Room 




1,878.35 





Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds 1,329.46 
Fuel and Light 1,780.66 

Office Maintenance 1,636.46 

Janitors' Supplies 454.01 

Express and All Other 218.81 



$40,764.93 
Balance to Revenue 2.93 



$40,767.86 $40,767.86 

AMERICAN LEGION QUARTERS 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ . 600.00 

Dr. 
Rent for Quarters $ 600.00 



$ 600.00 $ 600.00 

DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS QUARTERS 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 480.00 

Dr. 
Rent for Quarters $ 480.00 



$ 480.00 $ 480.00 
77 



VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS QUARTERS 

Cr. 
Appropriation $ 600.00 

Dr. 

Rent for Quarters $ 600.00 





? 


600.00 


$ 


600.00 




ARMISTICE DAY 








Appropriation 


Cr. 




$ 


150.00 


Showing of Film 
Wreaths and Bugler 
Essay Contest 
Entertainment 


Dr. 


75.00 
13.00 
20.00 
40.00 









$ 


148.00 


Balance to Revenue 




2.00 




$ 


150.00 


MEMORIAL DAY 




Cr. 






Appropriation 






. Dr. 






Bands and Sound Service 


$ 


335.20 


Flowers and Wreaths 




646.00 


Flags and Markers 




158.15 


Transportation and Refreshments 




181.95 




$ 


1,321.30 


Balance to Revenue 




203.70 



$ 150.00 



$ 1,525.00 



$ 1,525.00 $ 1,525.00 



78 



CIVIL DEFENSE 
Cr. 



Balance from 1952 




$ 1,734.38 


Petty Cash Refund 




25.00 


Dr. 






Salary, Director 


$ 1,200.00 




Clerical Assistance 


50.00 




Office Maintenance 


144.22 




Petty Cash Advance 


25.00 




Equipment and Entertainment 


96.98 






$ 1,516.20 




Balance to 1954 


243.18 






$ 1,759.38 


$ 1,759.38 



DAMAGES TO PERSONS AND PROPERTY 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 500.00 

Dr. 
Damages to Persons and Property $ 97.30 
Balance to Revenue 402.70 



$ 500.00 $ 500.00 

ARTICLE 12— 1952-SHAW PROPERTY PARKING LOT 

Cr. 



Balance from 1952 


Dr. 




$ 6,960.88 


Labor 




$ 2,486.47 




Shovel Hire 




1,076.02 




Tar Patch and Mixture 




866.09 




Erection Wire Fence 




894.30 




Equipment 




127.71 
$ 5,450.59 




Balance to 1954 




1,510.29 





$ 6,960.88 $ 6,960.88 
79 



ARTICLE 13— ENGINEERING STUDY OF PLAYGROUND 

AREA 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 1,000.00 

Dr. 
Engineering $ 610.00 



$ 610.00 
Balance to 1954 390.00 



$ 1,000.00 $ 1,000.00 

ARTICLE 18— MORAL OBLIGATION TO ALBERT COLE Jr. 

Cr. 



Appropriation 

Dr. 

Moral Obligation $ 


207.00 


$ 207.00 


$ 207.00 

INSURANCE 

Cr. 

Appropriation 
Refund 

Dr. 
Insurance $19,584.18 
Balance to Revenue 423.32 


$ 207.00 

$20,000.00 
7.50 


$20,007.50 

EUGENE V. LOVELY PENSION 

Cr. 

Appropriation 

Dr. 

Eugene V. Lovely Pension $ 2,354.00 


$20,007.50 
$ 2,354.00 



$ 2.354.00 $ 2,354.00 
80 



TOWN REPORTS 
Cr. 

Appropriation $ 1,400.00 

Dr. 

Printing Town Report $ 1,320.00 

Balance to Revenue 80.00 





$ 


1,400.00 


$ 1,400.00 


TOWN SCALES 






Cr. 








Appropriation 






$ 200.00 


Transfer from Reserve Fund 






1,800.00 


Dr. 








Salary, Public Weigher 


$ 


100.00 






$ 


100.00 




Transfer to 1954 




1,800.00 




Balance to Revenue 




100.00 





$ 2,000.00 $ 2,000.00 

RENT CONTROL BOARD 
Cr. 

Transfer from Reserve Fund $ 300.00 

Dr. 

Clerical Assistance $ 98.75 

Office Supplies and Advertising 31.58 



$ 130.33 
Balance to Reserve Fund 169.67 



$ 300.00 $ 300.00 

81 



ADMINISTRATIVE AND OFFICE, 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Cr. 

Appropriation $20,560.00 

Petty Cash Refund 50.00 

Dr. 
Salaries, Chairman, 

Board of Public Works $ 300.00 



Superintendent 

Engineer 

Clerks 
Petty Cash Advance 
Office Maintenance 


5,379.00 
4,505.00 
7,907.00 
50.00 
1,645.23 




Balance to Revenue 


$19,786.23 

823.77 




$20,610.00 

PARK DEPARTMENT 
Cr. 

Appropriation 


$20,610.00 
$ 6,400.00 



Dr. 

Labor $ 5,528.26 

Rental and Maintenance of Grounds 530.25 

Equipment 334.60 



$ 6,393.11 
Balance to Revenue 6.89 



$ 6,400.00 $ 6,400.00 

ARTICLE 30— BASEBALL DIAMONDS AT PLAYSTEAD 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 750.00 

Dr. 
Labor $ 627.60 

Equipment 122.40 



$ 750.00 $ 750.00 
82 



ARTICLE 22— 1951-ENCLOSING ROGERS BOOK 

Cr. 



Balance from 1952 






$ 


795.13 


Dr. 










Labor 


$ 


361.02 






Grates 




41.96 








$ 


402.98 




Balance to 1954 




392.15 








$ 


795.13 


$ 


795.13 


RECREATION 








Cr. 










Appropriation 






$10,894.25 


Dr. 










Playgrounds : 










Salaries, Instructors 


$ 3,653.95 






Police and Other Employees 




121.00 






Labor 




315.13 






Repairs 




376.53 






Equipment 




1,334.13 






Miscellaneous Supplies 




426.73 






-Entertainment 




382.59 






Pomps Pond: 










Salaries, Lifeguards, Matron 










and Others 




2,630.20 






Transportation 




520.00 






Repairs 




587.81 






Miscellaneous Supplies and All Other 233.95 






Skating 




300.73 







Balance to Revenue 



$10,882.75 
11.50 



$10,894.25 $10,894.25 



83 



WATER DEPARTMENT 
Cr. 



Appropriation 


$60,000.00 


Dr. 




Lawrence Gas and Electric Company $15,034.46 


Labor 


17,354.53 


Pipe and Fittings 


3,643.38 


Meters and Fittings 


5,103.87 


Equipment, Hardware and Tools 


737.01 


Office Maintenance and All Other 


867.65 


Maintenance of Pumping Station : 




Engineers 


9,422.57 


Lime and Chlorine 


1,493.20 


Coal 


3,995.74 


Pumping Equipment 


1,202.64 


Repairs on Buildings 


578.13 




$59,433.18 


Balance to Revenue 


566.82 



$60,000.00 $60,000.00 

ARTICLE 18—1952—16" LOW SERVICE FORCE MAIN 

Cr. 



Balance from 1952 


Dr. 




$ 4,704.69 


Labor 




$ 1,042.37 




Inspection Services — State 




299.24 




Tar Patch and Mixture 




342.39 




Grass Seed and Fertilizer 




119.23 






$ 1,803.23 




Balance to 1954 




2,901.46 





$ 4,704.69 $ 4,704.69 
84 



ARTICLE 20— EXTENDING AND IMPROVING 

WATER SYSTEM 

Gr. 

Appropriation $ 1,300.00 

Dr. 
Wayne Backhoe $ 60.57 

Balance to 1954 1,239.43 







$ 1,300.00 


$ 1,300.00 


ARTICLE 23— 1952— EXTENDING AND IMPROVING 


WATER SYSTEM 






Cr. 






Balance from 1952 


Dr. 




$ 3,678.77 


Labor 




$ 2,279.36 




Backhoe 




618.99 




Fittings and Compounds 




655.93 




All Other 




124.49 






$ 3,678.77 


$ 3,678.77 



ARTICLE 25— PICKUP TRUCK— BOARD OF 

PUBLIC WORKS 

Cr. 

Appropriation $ 1,300.00 

Dr. 
Purchase Truck $ 1,131.32 

Balance to 1954 168.68 



$ 1,300.00 $ 1,300.00 

SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 
Cr. 

Appropriation $18,379.00 

Perpetual Cares Income 2,664.07 

Raymond Fund Income 60.00 

Petty Cash Refund 10.00 

Amount Carried Forward $21,113.07 

85 



Amount Brought Forward 


$21,113.07 


Dr. 




Salaries, Superintendent 


$ 3,074.00 


Clerk 


250.00 


Labor 


11,120.52 


Office Maintenance 


234.62 


Petty Cash Advance 


10.00 


Equipment 


1,001.85 


Truck Maintenance 


345.42 


Seed, Loam and Gravel 


259.09 


Tarvia 


418.43 


Containers 


600.00 


All Other 


60.91 




$17,374.84 


Balance to Revenue 


3,738.23 



$21,113.07 $21,113.07 

ARTICLE 44— POWER MOWER— SPRING GROVE 
CEMETERY 



Appropriation 




$ 450.00 


Dr. 






Purchase Power Mower $ 


416.50 




Balance to 1954 


33.50 




$ 


450.00 


$ 450.00 


INTEREST 






Cr. 






Appropriation 




$11,406.25 


Dr. 






Interest $11,406.25 





$11,406.25 $11,406.25 

86 



MATURING DEBT 




Appropriation 

Dr. 
General Loans 




$79,000.00 


$79,000.00 
$79,000.00 






$79,000.00 


Town Clerk's Dog License Money 


$ 


2,951.80 


Cemetery Perpetual Cares 




2,703.00 


Income Cemetery Perpetual Cares 




743.47 


Income Private Trust Accounts 




1,176.58 


Essex County Tax 




60,261.25 


Clam Purification Plant 




423.69 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts 




3,761.55 


Retirement Fund 




22,953.00 


Withholding Taxes 




100,351.80 


U. S. Savings Bonds 




4,556.25 


Massachusetts Hospital Service - Blue Cross 


10,198.10 


Refunds 




5,240.49 


Refund — Estimated Receipts — Police Dept. 


29.60 


Total Expenditures for 1953 


$1,754,052.12 


Cash on Hand — January 1, 1954 




611,430.66 


Grand Total for 1953 


$2,365,482.78 


RESERVE FUND 




Cr. 






Transfer from Overlay Surplus 




$20,000.00 


Transfer of Balances 




289.28 


Dr. 






Rent Control 


$ 300.00 




Elections and Registration 


350.00 




Town Scales 


1,800.00 




Disability Assistance 


500.00 




School Department 


15,000.00 
$17,950.00 




Balance to Overlay Surplus 


l 2,339.28 
$20,289.28 






$20,289.28 



87 



TAXES 1950 



Balance from 1952 
Collected in 1953 
Tax Title Taken 
Abated 



$ 173.70 



48.60 

9.00 

116.10 







$ 173.70 


$ 173.70 




TAXES 


1951 




Balance from 1952 




$ 8,291.25 




Collected in 1953 






$ 5,925.75 


Tax Title Taken 






815.00 


Abated 






1,493.40 


Audit Adjustment, Surplus Revenue 


20.00 


Balance to 1954 






37.10 




$ 8,291.25 


$ 8,291.25 




TAXES 


1952 




Balance from 1952 




$50,640.08 




Refunds 




20.80 




Collected in 1953 






$45,739.26 


Tax Title Taken 






60.50 


Tax Titles Added 






849.20 


Abated 






956.00 


Balance to 1954 






3,055.92 




$50,660.88 


$50,660.88 




TAXES 


1953 




Commitments 1953 




$968,089.12 




Refunds 




2,358.21 




Adjustments, Overlay 1953 


6.00 




Collected in 1953 






$916,171.95 


Tax Titles Taken 






8.80 


Abated 






13,577.11 


Balance to 1954 


1 




40,695.47 



$970,453.33 $970,453.33 



88 



ESTATE OF DECEASED PERSONS 

Commitments 1953 $ 1,124.30 

Collected in 1953 $ 1,124.30 



$ 1,124.30 $ 1,124.30 
TAX TITLES 



Balance from 1952 $ 1,488.60 




Tax Titles Taken 1,954.59 




Tax Titles Added 880.08 




Audit Adjustment, Tax Title Revenue 1.00 




Redemptions 


$ 110.42 


Balance to 1954 


4,213.85 



$ 4,324.27 $ 4,324.27 

TAX TITLE POSSESSIONS 

Balance from 1952 $ 841.42 

Balance to 1954 $ 841.42 



$ 841.42 $ 841.42 
MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE TAXES 1951 

Balance from 1952 $ 1,032.71 

Collected in 1953 $ 465.73 

Abated 566.98 



$ 1,032.71 $ 1,032.71 
MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE TAXES 1952 



Balance from 1952 


$ 6,627.47 




Commitments in 1953 


8,686.08 




Refunds 


323.37 




Collected in 1953 




$13,274.43 


Abated 




2,193.76 


Balance to 1954 




168.73 



$15,636.92 $15,636.92 
89 



MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE TAXES 1953 

Commitments $130,182.21 

Refunds 2,153.74 

Collected in 1953 $107,433.96 

Abated 7,067.55 

Balance to 1954 17,834.44 



$132,335.95 $132,335.95 

CLASSIFIED FOREST LAND 

Commitment $ 5.72 

Collected in 1953 $ 5.72 



$ 5.72 $ 5.72 

SEWER ASSESSMENTS PAID IN ADVANCE 

Commitments $ 1,995.13 

Collected in 1953 $ 1,995.13 



$ 1,995.13 $ 1,995.13 

UNAPPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS NOT DUE 

Commitments $ 255.79 

Collected in 1953 $ 255.79 



$ 255.79 $ 255.79 

UNAPPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1949 

Balance from 1952 $ 1,466.91 

Collected in 1953 $ 498.00 

Apportioned 702.81 

Tax Titles Taken 159.20 

Balance to 1954 106.90 



$ 1,466.91 $ 1,466.91 

UNAPPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1952 

Balance from 1952 $ 444.58 

Sewer Assessments 1953 $ 444.58 



$ 444.58 $ 444.58 
90 



UN APPORTIONED SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1953 

Commitment $ 5,740.39 

Collected in 1953 $ 4,083.19 

Apportioned 1,201.20 

Balance to 1954 456.00 



$ 5,740.39 $ 5,740.39 

SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1952 

Balance from 1952 $ 842.15 

Collected in 1953 $ 315.15 

Balance to 1954 527.00 



$ 842.15 $ 842.15 

SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1953 

Commitment $ 1,326.87 

Unapportioned Sewer Asses. 1952 444.58 

Collected in 1953 $ 1,312.27 

Balance to 1954 459.18 



$ 1,771.45 $ 1,771.45 

COMMITTED INTEREST ON SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1952 

Balance from 1952 $ 72.49 

Collected in 1953 $ 72.49 



$ 72.49 $ 72.49 

COMMITTED INTEREST ON SEWER ASSESSMENTS 1953 

Commitment $ 366.60 

Collected in 1953 $ 358.84 

Balance to 1954 7.76 



$ 366.60 $ 366.60 

OVERLAY 1950 

Balance from 1952 $ 173.70 

Abatements $ 116.10 

Overlay Surplus 57.60 



$ 173.70 $ 173.70 

91 





OVERLAY 


1951 




Balance from 1952 
Abatements 




$ 1,493.40 


$ 8,291.25 


Overlay Surplus 




6,760.75 




Balance to 1954 




37.10 






$ 8,291.25 


$ 8,291.25 




OVERLAY 


1952 




Balance from 1952 






$15,417.43 


Abatements 




$ 956.00 




Overlay Surplus 




11,405.51 




Balance to 1954 




3,055.92 
$15,417.43 






$15,417.43 




OVERLAY 


1953 




Overlay 1953 






$28,602.91 


Poll Taxes 1953 






6.00 


Abatements 




$13,577.11 




Balance to 1954 




15,031.80 

$28,608.91 






$28,608.91 


OVERLAY SURPLUS 




Balance from 1952 






$34,146.10 


Overlays 1950 - 1951 


-1952 




18,223.86 


Reserve Fund Unexpended Balances 


2,339.28 


Reserve Fund 1952 - 


Police Dept. 


Bal. 


1,036.11 


Transferred to Reserve Fund 


$20,000.00 




Balance to 1954 




35,745.35 





$55,745.35 $55,745.35 
DEPARTMENTAL ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Balances from 1952 $ 4,212.35 

Charges, Accounts Receivable in 1953 74,637.39 

Refunds 338.50 

Balances from 1952 

Collected in 1953 

Abated 

Balance to 1954 505.00 



> 235.00 

74,530.92 

314.00 

4,613.32 



$79,693.24 $79,693.24 



92 



STATE AND COUNTY AID TO HIGHWAYS 
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Charges for 1952, Audit Adjustment $ 667.00 
Charges for 1953 1,000.00 

Collected in 1953 $ 667.00 

Balance to 1954 1,000.00 



$ 1,667.00 $ 1,667.00 

WATER RATES ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Balance from 1952 $12,329.69 

Commitments, Charges 1953 83,093.63 

Water Services and Miscellaneous 2.60 

Water Revenue, Audit Adjustment 2,156.32 
Collected in 1953 $75,080.02 

Water Liens Added to Taxes 2,257.86 

Water Services and Miscellaneous 35.64 

Water Revenue, Audit Adjustment 10.76 

Balance to 1954 20,197.96 



$97,582.24 $97,582.24 

WATER SERVICES AND MISCELLANEOUS 
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

Balance from 1952 $ 190.24 

Charges 735.80 

Water Rates 35.64 

Collected in 1953 $ 721.04 

Water Rates 2.60 

Balance to 1954 238.04 



$ 961.68 $ 961.68 

WATER LIENS ADDED TO TAXES 1949 

Balance from 1952 $ 32.29 

Collected in 1953 $ 10.00 

Tax Titles Taken 22.29 



$ 32.29 $ 32.29 

93 



WATER LIENS ADDED TO TAXES 1951 

Balance from 1952 $ 249.15 

Collected in 1953 $ 249.15 

$ 249.15 $ 249.15 
WATER LIENS ADDED TO TAXES 1952 
Balance from 1952 $ 177.06 

Collected in 1953 $ 177.06 



$ 177.06 $ 177.06 
WATER LIENS ADDED TO TAXES 1953 

Water Rates $ 2,257.86 

Refund 22.95 

Collected in 1953 $ 431.01 

Abated 92.99 

Balance to 1954 1,756.81 



$ 2,280.81 $ 2,280.81 

SURPLUS REVENUE 

Balance from 1952 $400,483.15 

Unexpended Appropriation Balances 1952 531.39 

State and County Aid to Highways Revenue 667.00 

Old Age Assistance Recoveries 6,795.22 

Estate of Deceased Persons Revenue 1,124.30 

Tax Title Revenue 110.42 

Revenue 1953 113,785.20 

Insurance for Damages to Motor Pumping Station 942.48 
Miscellaneous Refunds 87.00 

Real Estate Taxes 1951 - 

Audit Adjustment $ 20.00 

Article 31 - Ballardvale Sewer 40,000.00 

Revenue 1953 (To Reduce 1953 

Tax Rate) 60,000.00 

Estimated Receipts, Damages to 

Motor, Pumping Station 942.48 

Tax Titles Taken 884.50 

Tax Titles Added 849.20 

Balance to 1954 421,829.98 

$524,526.16 $524,526.16 

94 



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96 



Report of the 
Trustees of Punchard Free School 



Year Ending December 31, 1953 

PRINCIPAL FUND 

January 1, 1953 

Cash in Banks $13,405.62 

Real Estate Mortgages 33,575.00 

Bonds at Book Value 30,019.38 



r 31, 1953 

Cash in Banks 

Real Estate Mortgages 

Bonds at Book Value 


$14,136.92 
32,843.70 
30,019.38 


INCOME ACCOUNT 

1,1953 Cash on Hand $6,982.11 
Interest and 

Dividends Rec'd 2,640.54 



Expenditures 

Safe Deposit Box $ 12.00 

Treasurer's Bond 25.00 

E. E. Hammond — Salary 200.00 

Expenditures for Punchard 

Library, Commerical Dept., 

Manual Training Dept., 

Transportation, etc. 2,204.15 

December 31, 1953 — Cash on Hand 7,181.50 



97 



$77,000.00 



$77,000.00 



$ 9,622.65 



$ 9,622.6r> 



GOLDSMITH FUND 

Jan. 1, 1953 Cash in Savings Bank $ 350.22 
Interest Received 8.55 





$ 358.77 


Prizes Awarded 


10.00 


Dec. 31, 1953 Cash in Savings Bank 




DRAPER FUND 




Jan. 1, 1953 Cash in Savings Bank 


$1,512.26 


Interest Received 


37.66 




$1,549.92 


Scholarship Awarded 


30.00 


Dec. 31, 1953 Cash in Savings Bank 




BARNARD FUND 




Jan. 1, 1053 Cash in Savings Bank 


$ 29.32 


Dividends Received 


40.00 


Interest Received 


.47 




$ 69.79 


Prizes Awarded 


40.00 


Dec. 31, 1953 Cash in Savings Bank 




CHAPIN FUND 




Jan. 1, 1953 Cash in Savings Bank 


$2,249.99 


Interest Received 


55.96 




$2,305.95 


Scholarship Awarded 


50.00 


Dec. 31, 1953 Cash in Savings Bank 




RESERVE FUND 




Jan. 1, 1953 Cash in Savings Bank 


$3,901.72 


Interest Received 


98.14 



$ 348.77 



$1,519.92 



$ 29.79 



$2,255.95 



Dec. 31, 1953 Cash in Savings Bank $3,999.86 

98 



HENRY WARREN BARNARD AND MABEL PARADISE 
BARNARD FUND 

Jan. 1, 1953 Cash in Savings Bank $1,026.83 
Interest Received 25.82 



^ec. 31, 1953 Cash in Savings Bank $1,052.65 

ELIZABETH T. GUTTERSON SCHOLARSHIP 

Jan. 1, 1953 Cash in Savings Bank $1,031.33 
Interest Received 25.69 



$1,057.02 
Scholarship Awarded 20.00 



Dec. 31, 1953 Cash in Savings Bank $1,037.02 

M. E. GUTTERSON BOTANY PRIZES 

Jan. 1, 1953 Cash in Savings Bank $ 313.66 
Interest Received 7.81 



$ 321.47 
Prizes Awarded 5.00 



Dec. 31, 1953 Cash in Savings Bank $ 316.47 

ALICE M. BELL FUND 

Jan. 1, 1953 Cash in Savings Bank $1,013.43 
Interest Received 25.49 



Dec. 31, 1953 Cash in Savings Bank $1,038.92 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edmond E. Hammond 

Treasurer 

This is to certify that the securities belonging to the 
Trustees of Punchard Free School and the income accruing 
therefrom have been checked and found to be correct. 

The remaining items in the above account are examined by 
the Town Accountant. 

Roy E. Hardy 
Harry Sellars 

99 



Report of 
Trustees of Memorial Hall Library 



Cash January 1, 1953 

Income from Investments, Savings Banks 

and Contributions 
Redemption of Bonds 


$ 546.64 

3,094.04 
999.00 


Total Cash and Income 

Paid Town of Andover 

Safe Deposit Box Rental 

Surety Bond for Treasurer 

Electrical Contractor 

World Politics Discussion Group 


$4,639.68 

$2,800.00 
12.50 
25.00 

7.74 
48.00 


Total Disbursements 
Balance December 31, 1953 

LeoF. 


$2,893.24 
$1,746.44 

Daley 
Treasurer 



100 



JOHN CORNELL WOOD AND COAL FUND 
Principal Fund. 



Andover Savings Bank, Andover #13259 
Essex Savings Bank, Lawrence #82865 
Broadway Savings Bank, Lawrence #13403 
City Inst. Savings Bank, Lowell #69782 
The Central Savings Bank, Lowell #21760 



Receipts 

Balance on hand January 1st, 1953 
Interest received during 1953 



Expenditures 
1953 None 

Balance on hand January 1st, 1954 

Respectfully submitted, 



$1,000.00 
$1,000.00 
$1,000.00 
$1,000.00 
$1,000.00 

$5,000.00 



$ 787.97 
132.50 

$ 920.47 



00.00 



$ 920.47 



Edward P. Hall, Chairman 
Fred E. Cheever, Treasurer 
Arthur W. Cole 



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112 



Town Debt 

DETAIL OF PAYMENT BY YEARS 





Junior High 


Elementary 






School 


Schools 




Year 


2% 


iy 2 % 


Total 


1954 


$4,000. 


$ 55,000. 


$ 59,000. 


1955 


4,000. 


55,000. 


59,000. 


1956 




55,000. 


55,000. 


1957 




55,000. 


55,000. 


1958 




55,000. 


55,000. 


1959 




55,000. 


55,000. 


1960 




55,000. 


55,000. 


1961 




55,000. 


55,000. 


1962 




50,000. 


50,000. 


1963 




50,000. 


50,000. 


1964 




50,000. 


50,000. 


1965 




50,000. 


50,000. 


1966 




50,000. 


50,000. 


Totals 


$8,000. 


$690,000. 


$698,000. 



113 



Andover Contributory 
Board of Retirement Report 



To the Board of Selectmen : 
Andover, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

The Town of Andover Contributory Board of Retirement 
herewith submits the following report for the year 1953: 



Cash on Hand, January 1, 


1953 




$ 4,748.70 


Receipts : 








Appropriations : 








Town Pension Fund 




$21,153.00 




Expense Fund 




1,800.00 




Andover Housing Authority 






Pension Fund 




177.00 






$23,130.00 




Members Contributions 




21,154.20 


• 


Bonds Matured 




5,000.00 




Interest on Investments 




7,541.39 


$61,574.29 



Expenditures : 

Retirement Allowances $34,747.18 

Investments 20,300.00 

Accrued Interest on Investments 167.74 

Refunds, Contributions and Interest 4,282.42 
Office Maintenance: 

Clerical Assistance 1,509.60 

Office Supplies, Postage & All Other 296.43 



$ 1,806.03 

$61,303.37 
Cash on Hand, January 1, 1954 $ 270.92 



114 



Statement of Assets and Liabilities 

Assets 

Cash, Andover National Bank $ 270.92 

Investments : 

Bank Stocks 17,565.00 
Government Bonds 110,412.30 

Railroad Bonds 52,558.34 

Telephone Bonds 21,785.63 

Public Utility Bonds 43,038.31 

Interest Due and Accrued, December 31, 1953 1,618.48 



$247,248.98 



LIABILITIES 

Annuity Savings Fund $156,112.41 

Special Fund for Military Service 1,711.27 

Annuity Reserve Fund 35,106.98 

Pension Fund 54,306.54 

Expense Fund ^ 11.78 



$247,248.98 



The required appropriation by the Town for 1954 is, Pen- 
sion Fund $30,534.00, Office Maintenance, $1,800. Andover 
Housing Authority, Pension Fund $271.00. 

During the year eleven employees were taken into the 
system. Seven members were retired and six left the employ 
of the Town. One pensioner died. 

On December 31, 1953 there were one hundred and thirty 
four active members, four inactive and thirty-two on re- 
tirement. 

Respectfully submitted 

George C. Napier, Chairman 
David L. Nicoll, Secretary 
Edmond E. Hammond, 

Board of Retirement 

115 



Treasurer's Report 



Receipts and payments for the year were as follows: 
Balance, January 1, 1953 $ 510,111.66 
Receipts 1,855,371.12 

$2,365,482.78 

Payments 1,754,052.12 



Balance, December 31, 1953 $ 611,430.66 

Disbursements were in accordance with 107 Selectmen's 
warrants and nearly 19,000 checks were issued. Included in 
the totals above is $100,351.80 for federal taxes withheld 
from the pay of 355 persons, two-thirds of whom were full- 
time town employees. Payroll deductions for the purchase of 
U. S. Savings Bonds amounted to $4,501.11 and $9,787.00 for 
Blue Cross — Blue Shield dues. 

Cemetery perpetual care and other trust funds, as well 
as the funds of the Retirement Board, all in the treasurer's 
custody, are listed on other pages of this report. One pen- 
sioner died during the year and 7 new ones were added, ma- 
king a total of 32. The average monthly pension increased 
by $16. to over $106. 

Tax titles number 151, of which 128 are in the "Andover 
Park" Section in Ballardvale, and amount to $3,591.78. 

The treasurer is just completing a quarter century in 
town office. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thaxter Eaton, Treasurer 



116 



Report of Tax Collector 



POLL TAXES 




Year Collected 


Abated 


Outstanding 


1953 


1953 


Jan. 1, 1954 


1952 $ 28.00 




None 


1953 7,186.00 


*$ 1,424.00 


$ 12.00 


*Of this amount: 







Abatements to Men over 65 years $926.00 
Abatements to Men in Armed Services $362.00 



PERSONNAL TAXES 



Year 


Collected 


Abated 


Outstanding 




1953 


1953 


Jan. 1, 1954 


1950 


$ 48.60 


$ 116.10 


$ None 


1951 


728.48 


1,137.00 


37.10 


1952 


4,677.42 


529.10 


1,229.14 


1953 


109,587.30 


636.68 


4,282.94 




REAL ESTATE 


TAXES 




Year 


Collected 


Abated 


Outstanding 




1953 


1953 


Jan. 1, 1954 


1951 


$ 5,197.27 


$ 356.40 


$ None 


1952 


41,033.84 


426.90 


1,826.78 


1953 


799,398.65 


11,514.43 


36,400.53 




MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE 




Year 


Collected 


Abated 


Outstanding 




1953 


1953 


Jan. 1, 1954 


1951 


$ 465.73 


$ 566.98 


$ None 


1952 


13,274.43 


2,193.76 


168.73 


1953 


107,433.96 


7,067.55 


** 17,834.44 



: $20,806.87 committed in Dec. and not due until Jan. 



17 



MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTIONS 

Water Liens $ 867.22 

Sewer Assessments 1,627.42 
Sewer Assessments (apportioned) Paid in advance 1,995.13 

Sewer Assessments (unapportioned) 4,836.98 

Committed Interest on Sewer Assessments 431.33 

Classified Forest Land Tax 5.72 

Interest on Delinquent Taxes 2,059.34 

Estate of Deceased Persons 1,124.30 






118 




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19 



Assessors' Report 



We herewith submit our annual report : — 
Number of polls assessed 4,282 

Number of persons assessed 3,854 

(real and personal) 



Valuation — personal prop. 


$ 2,601,130.00 


Valuation — real estate 


19,204,075.00 




$°1 RO^ °0^ 00 




<p£jX)0\JtJ,d\JO • \J\J 


Tax on polls 


$ 8,564.00 


Tax on personal property 


114,449.72 


Tax on real estate 


844,979.30 




967 993 0^ 




V\J 1 ,UtJO.\J£i 


Apportioned Sewer 


1,326.87 


Committed Interest 


366.60 


Water Liens added to taxes 


2,257.86 


Abatements : — 




Poll taxes 


1,420.00 


Personal Property 


2,418.88 


Real Estate 


12,297.73 


Rate of taxation per $1,000. 


- $44.00 


Number of assessed : — 




Horses 


63 


Cows 


392 


Yearlings, bulls, and heifers 201 


Swine 


395 


Sheep 


155 


Fowl 


49,470 


All other 


333 


Number of acres assessed 


16,906 + 


Number of dwelling houses assessed 3,506 






Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 
Number of vehicles assessed 6,403 

Assessed valuation $3,429,100.00 

Excise 138,827.27 

Abatements 9,828.29 

Rate per $1,000. - $50.42 

120 



Additional Assessments 
Number of polls assessed 20 

Number of persons assessed 7 

(real and personal) 
Valuation — personal prop. $ 250.00 

Valuation — Real Estate 1,155.00 

Tax on polls 40.00 

Tax on personal property 11.00 

Tax on real estate 50.82 

Number of acres assessed 36.87+; 

Respectfully submitted, 

Roy E. Hardy, Chairman 
J. Everett Collins 
Sidney P. White 

MUNICIPAL PROPERTIES AND PUBLIC 
IMPROVEMENTS 





Land and 
Buildings 


Equip, and 
other prop. 


Total 


Town Hall 


$ 115,900 


$ 15,150 


$ 131.050 


Shaw Property 


12,000 




12,00 


Fire Department 


92,175 


60,000 


152,175 


Police Department 


600 


4,000 


4,600 


Schools 


2,754,750 


82,000 


2,836,750 


Library 


212,000 


40,000 


252,000 


Water Department 


139,000 


1,319,430 


1,458,430 


Sewer Department 


2,700 


636,095 


638,795 


Highway Department 


26,200 


76,000 


102,200 


Parks and Playgrounds 


69,300 


6,200 


75.500 


Tree Warden & Moth Departments 




10,000 


10,000 


Infirmary 


80.300 


2,500 


82,800 


Spring Grove Cemetery 


36,350 


1,125 


37.475 


Weights and Measures 




350 


350 


Town Scales 




500 


500 


Old Schoolhouses 


47,750 




47,750 


Punchard School Fund 




84,199 


84,199 


Memorial Hall Investment Funds 




93.055 


93,055 


Pomps Pond Bathing Beach 


7,050 


300 


7,350 


Beacon & Lowell Sts. - land 


1,00C 




1,000 


Burnham Road - land 


2,500 




2,500 


Indian Ridge -land 


1,000 




1,000 


Woodland - West District 


275 




275 


Carmel Woods - land 


12,000 




12,000 


Main & Dwight Sts. - land 


5,000 




5,000 


Public Dump Site - land 


2,800 




2,800 


Tax Title Possessions 


2,225 




2,225 


Totals 


3,622,875 


2,430,904 


6,053,779 



121 



Board of Public Welfare 



The Board of Public Welfare submits the following 
report for the year 1953. 

Under the Old Age Assistance program we added twenty- 
seven cases to our rolls during 1953, and dropped twenty- 
eight through death and other causes. We had forty-one ap- 
plications for this form of aid, and of these, fourteen were 
found to be ineligible. On January 1, 1953, we had one hun- 
dred and seventy-five cases, and at the close of the year one 
hundred and seventy-four. Collections under the lien law 
which went into effect on January 1, 1952, amounted to $10, 
448,50. Under this law, we are able to collect from Old Age 
Assistance recipients who own real estate, either at the time 
of death, or through a sale of real estate prior to death, all 
assistance rendered from January 1, 1952, to time of sale. 
Medical care under all forms of assistance has grown to be 
one of the most expensive items of government, and the State 
Department of Public Welfare is working on a uniform fee 
schedule for doctors. However, hospital rates for indigent 
persons have risen from $4.00 a day in 1945 to $14.00 a day 
on January 1, 1954. 

Our Aid to Dependent Children form of assistance has 
shown a slight drop in the number of cases, and also in the 
cost. At the start of the year we were aiding fourteen cases, 
and we had twelve cases on our roll at the end of the year. 

Disability Assistance has shown an increase each year 
since it was started in 1951. More and more people have 
been unable to find employment due to physical handicaps, 
and have discovered that they are unable to qualify under the 
Old Age and Survivors Insurance Act. Due to medical needs, 
some form of assistance is necessary until they reach the 
age of sixty-five. Seventy-five per cent of the funds for this 
program are contributed by the State and Federal Govern- 
ments. Although we are only aiding nine cases at the close 
of 1953, some of these cases have been very expensive, due 
to lengthy hospitalization. 

122 



General Relief has been about the same for the past few- 
years, but with so much unemployment we can expect more 
people to seek relief in one form or another. However, our 
President is seeking numerous changes in the Social Security 
Act, which could affect the overall picture of public welfare, 
and we believe there are many good features in his program. 

We wish to take this opportunity to thank all citizens and 
private organizations who have assisted our department and 
contributed to the welfare of our citizens. 

Respectfuly submitted, 

Roy E. Hardy, Chairman 
J. Everett Collins 
Sidney P. White 

Arthur W. Cole, Welfare Agent 



123 



Report of Trustees of Spring Grove 

Cemetery 



The Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery submit their an- 
nual Report for the Year 1953. 

There were sixty nine Interments during the year. Nine- 
teen new Lots were sold which are all under Perpetual care. 

The amount of perpetual care for lots sold during the year 
was $2,303.00 dollars. Four old lots were placed under per- 
petual care totalling $400.00 dollars. 

The income from perpetual care funds for the year amoun- 
ted to $2,664.07 dollars. 

Monies received from annual care, Sale of lots, Founda- 
tions, Interments, Flower rings, etc., amounted to $5,225.12 
dollars. There were 31 Foundations set during the year. 

Four hundred and twenty five feet of permanent hard 
black top road was constructed on the East side of the Ceme- 
tery. 

Fifty feet of curbing was installed on the West side of the 
Cemetery. 

Three hundred and twenty five feet of stone wall border- 
ing Abbot Street has been recapped. 

Trees and shrubery have had their annual prunning and 
trimming. 

The Trustees are cooperating with the Board of Public 
Works making available our equipment and men during 
snow storms. 

Frank R. Petty, Chairman 
Fred E. Cheever, Secretary 
Albert E. Curtis 
Malcolm E. Lundgren 
William D. McIntyre 
Trustees of Spring Grove Cemetery^ 

124 



Office of Veterans' Service 



The Veteran population of Andover still increases weekly 
as our Tenth Annual Report of Veterans' Services and Re- 
habilitation is presented. Young men and women are still 
joining the various branches of the Armed Services and 
those whose tour of duty has been completed are returning 
home to participate in the various benefits offered by the 
State and Nation. This will continue until Congress or the 
President officially declares that the Korean Campaign is 
terminated. 

The number of veterans in Masachusetts, including all 
wars, has now reached one million and in Andover twenty- 
three hundred would be a fair guess. Veterans' laws take 
into consideration the wives, children, and parents of vete- 
rans so the potential number of our townsmen who may be 
eligible for benefits some time is approximately half of the 
town population. This, of course, refers to Federal and State 
benefits. 

The number of conferences involving paper work or re- 
search during the year was 2,085. The main categories of 
Rehabilitation were : photostatic copies of discharge papers, 
270; pension claims, 127; medical cases, 119; education and 
training, 94 ; insurance, 91 ; employment, 60 ; hospitalization, 
54; housing, 50; with the remaining 1,220 cases embracing 
scores of other items connected with service to veterans. 

As 1953 ended our office had processed 231 applications 
for the Massachusetts State Korean Bonus and completed 
follow-up work on 112 such applications. 

During the year, there were 6 veteran deaths: 3 World 
War I ; 2 World War II ; and I Spanish American War. 

In mid-Summer the local textile industry laid off many 
employees and as 1953 drew to an end other local industries 
started to lay off help gradually. Many of those who found 

125 



themselves without work were from fifty-five to over sixty 
years of age. They were not old enough to collect Social 
Security Benefits and found that their Unemployment Com- 
pensation Benefits were becoming exhausted in November 
and December. These factors will have a very definite effect 
on our calls for aid during the year 1954 as many of these 
unfortunate people are veterans of World War I or depend- 
ents of veterans of recent wars. 

We wish to thank all veterans organizations, the Red Cross 
Chapter, and all local charitable organizations for their con- 
tinued cooperation and support towards this office. Their 
efforts in assisting us are deeply appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Roy E. Hardy, Chairman 
Board of Selectmen 

J. Everett Collins 
Sidney P. White 

Francis P. Markey, Agent 
Office of Veterans' Services 



126 



Fourth Annual Report of the Andover 
Housing Authority 



Nineteen hundred and fifty-three was the third full year 
of occupancy of the Andover Housing Project 200-1. 

Two new members were elected to the Andover Housing 
Authority in 1953. Thomas R. Wallace was elected to a one 
year term, and George Noury to a five year term to expire in 
1958. Franklin K. Haggerty served as chairman of the Au- 
thority in 1953. 

There was a turnover of twelve families in the project 
in the year 1953. Most of the families leaving the Project 
bought or built homes of their own. The Authority has at 
present five needy applications for two and three bedroom 
units. All Andover Veterans that have been approved to en- 
ter the project have been taken care of and it is the policy of 
the Authority to take care of the Andover Veterans when it 
is possible. 

The parking area has been increased to take care of twelve 
more cars so that each apartment has parking for one car. 
Plans are being made to have all the trim, windows, and iron 
railings painted this year. Also screens will be installed on all 
cellar windows for better ventilation. 

There are 56 units in the project with an average shelter 
rent of $37.00 plus utilities and the income limits to enter 
the project are: one minor dependents, $3650.00; two minor 
dependents $3775.00; three or more minor dependents, 
$3900.00. 

The payment to the Town of Andover in lieu of taxes for 
the year 1952 was $1,226.40. 

The members of the Andover Housing Authority .as of 
December 31, 1953 are Franklin K. Haggerty, Chairman; 
Garrett Burke, Vice Chairman ; Thomas R. Wallace, Treasu- 
rer; George Noury, Ass't Treasurer; Charles C. Hatch, Se- 
cretary; Ernest N. Hall is Executive Director and Project 
Secretary, James E. Manning, is Manager. 

127 



A balance sheet and statement of operations for the nine 
month period ending December 31st is attached. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Ernest N. Hall, Executive Director 

BALANCE SHEET 
December Si, 1953 



ASSETS 






Cash — Andover National Bank 






Administration Fund 


$23,775.56 




Security Deposit Fund 


660.00 




Accounts Receivable — Tenants 




$ 24,435.56 


Debt Service Fund 




117.00 


Debt Service Trust Fund 




9,167.67 


Investment Debt Service Trust Fund 


1,000.00 


Development costs 




626,000.00 


Total 




661,611.03 


LIABILITIES AND 


CAPITAL 




Income Tax Witholding 




19.60 


Pension Fund Deduction 




17.50 


Accrued Liabilities 






Insurance 


$ 2,957.00 




Payments in lieu of taxes 


1,465.33 




Matured Interest and Principal 


10,769.92 


15,192.25 


Undistributed Credits 






Tenants Security Deposits 


660.00 




Tenants Prepaid Rent 


105.00 


765.00 


Fixed Liabilities 






Bonds Authorized and Issued 




626,000.00 


Reserves 






Debt Service 


3,484.15 




Unamortized Bond Premium 


1,890.80 




Operating Reserve 


8,492.64 


13,867.59 
$655,861.94 


Surplus (Deficit) 




5,749.09 
$661,611.03 



128 



Statement of Operations for Nine Months Ending 
December 31, 1953 

Income 



Rents 


$27,570.00 




Less - Vacancy loss 


130.02 


$27,440.00 


Contribution from State-Twelve Mo: 


nths Period 


15,650.00 


Total Income 


$43,090.00 


Expenses 






Management Expenses 


$ 1,887.55 




Operating Services 


955.80 




Utilities 


7,786.90 




Repairs, Maint. & Replacements 


2,535.69 




Insurance Expense 


1,314.88 




Payments in lieu of Taxes 


1,009.93 




Provision for Operating Reserve 


2,520.00 





Provision for Debt Service Reserve 1,493.21 
Debt Service Requirements 17,259.95 

Operating Improvements 577.00 



37,340.91 



Surplus Deficit $ 5,749.09 



129 



Board of Appeals Report 



To the Board of Selectmen : — 

The Board of Appeals under the Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Andover has the following members: James S. 
Eastham, Chairman, term expiring May 1, 1955; Roy E. 
Hardy, Secretary, term expiring May 1, 1956; Edward P. 
Hall, term expiring May 1, 1954 ; and two associate members, 
Leon A. Field and Walter C. Tomlinson, terms expiring 
May 1, 1954. 

During the year 1953, the eighteenth year of the Zoning 
By-Law, the Board decided eleven cases as follows : 

Petition of Harry A. Ramsdell, decided on February 20, 
1953, for permission to subdivide property owned by him on 
the northwest corner of Whittier and Summer Streets, there 
being two houses located on the property. Granted 

Petition of Chester D. Abbott, decided on April 2, 1953, 
for permission to convert a one-family house to be owned 
by him at 115 Red Spring Road into a two-apartment house. 

Granted 

Petition of Douglas N. Howe, decided on April 2, 1953, 
for permission to build and maintain a residence at the 
southwest corner of Kennilworth Street and Riverina Road, 
with a side yard of less than 15 feet. Granted 

Petition of Carl A. Wetterberg and Glennie P. Wetterberg, 
decided on April 2, 1953, for permission to convert a one- 
family house owned by them at 53 Summer Street into a 
two-apartment house. Granted 

Petition of Fred E. Cheever, decided April 2, 1953, for 
permission to convert a dwelling house owned by him on 
Hidden Road into a nine-apartment house. Granted 

130 



Petition of Guy B. Howe and Carolyn D. Howe, decided 
on May 15, 1953, for permission to erect and maintain a 
motel at the northwest corner of Prospect Road and the 
Andover By-Pass. Denied 

Petition of Guy B. Howe and Carolyn D. Howe, decided 
on May 15, 1953, for permission to erect and maintain a 
motel at the northeast corner of Gould Road and South Main 
Street. Denied (Because of one negative vote) 

Petition of Mary C. McClellan, decided on June 5, 1953, 
for a variance from the Zoning By-Law to permit a land 
subdivision of property owned by her on Shawsheen Road, 
resulting in front and side yards less than are permitted by 
the Zoning By-Law. Denied 

Petition of Ann M. Sweeney and Elizabeth R. Sweeney, 
decided on June 5, 1953, for permission to subdivide property 
owned by them on the east side of Florence Street, being 
numbered 16-22 Florence Street, there being two houses and 
a barn located on the property. Granted 

Petition of Woodworth Motors, Inc., decided on September 
25, 1953, for permission under Section VI, Paragraph 7, of 
the Zoning By-Law to use the vacant lot on the northeast 
corner of North Main and Haverhill Streets in Shawsheen 
Village for the sale of motor vehicles under a Class 1 Deal- 
er's license. Granted 

Petition of William J. Young, decided on November 23, 
1953, for permission to convert a three-apartment house 
owned by him at 44 Elm Street into a four-apartment house. 

Granted 

Respectfully submitted, 

James S. Eastham, Chairman 
Roy E. Hardy, Secretary 
Edward P. Hall 



131 



Report of Planning Board and Board 

of Survey 



The following Public Hearings were held by the Planning 
Board during the year 1953 : 

January 26 — A petition by Samuel Arcidy requesting the 
approval of a plan of land at Sutherland Street Extension 
for the purpose of subdivision and opening for public use a 
private way as shown thereon. 

The Board voted not to approve this plan until certain 
conditions are met as: water main extension, gravel on re- 
quired width, grade altered and a banking at side of way 
removed. 

April 3 — The petitioner, Frank Cairns, requested appro- 
val of a plan located east of Pine Street for the purpose of 
subdivision and opening for public use a private way as 
shown thereon. 

The Board agreed to take no action at this meeting and 
voted to meet on April 9, 1953 for further consideration. 

April 9 — At this meeting the Board agreed to approve 
and sign a plan of land east of Pine Street for Mr. Cairns 
provided he obtained a Performance Bond to cover work on 
Water, Sewer and Drain Installations and brought to the 
required grade. 

June 18 — Fred E. Cheever requested approval of a plan 
of land known as the "Lewis Estate" located between Hid- 
den Road and Main Street for purpose of subdivision only. 
This plan was approved. 

At this meeting, the plan of Sutherland Street Extension, 
hearing for which was held on January 26, was approved 
and signed. 

132 



Also, the plan of land east of Pine Street on petition by 
Frank Cairns was approved and signed since Mr. Cairns 
through a Surety Bond guaranteed that the road surface 
will meet the grade requirements and will be properly gra- 
veled. 

A profile plan of a way in Shawsheen Hylands off Lowell 
Street revised May 15, 1953 was approved and signed. The 
original hearing was held July 7, 1952. 

A recorded plan of a private way off School Street, for- 
merly the Jerome Cross land, was approved. 

October 9 — The Board met to consider approval of the se- 
cond section or extension of "Pine Acres" off Pine Street on 
petition of Frank Cairns. This plan was approved and covers 
lots 9 through 14 and circle area. 

November 6 — The petitioner Fred E. Cheever requested 
approval of a plan of land located on Shawsheen Road and 
abuting Beech Circle for the purpose of subdivision and 
opening for public use a private way as shown thereon. This 
plan was approved. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter C. Tomlinson, Chairman 
Leon A. Field, Secretary 
Frederick E. Cheever 
Kirk R. Batcheller 
Richard C. Simmers 

Edward R. Lawson, Clerk 



133 



Report of Recreation Committee 



Summer Activities 
The total registration on the five town playgrounds was 
975. The total attendance figure for the summer was 30,459. 
Games, sports, arts, and crafts, special weekly activities, 
tournaments and inter-playground competitions were blen- 
ded to give the children a busy and enjoyable season. The 
Canobie Lake Excursion, the Annual Field Day and Annual 
Ballardvale carnival were featured events in which all play- 
grounds participated. The Twi-light Baseball League had a 
very successful season, the calibre of baseball played being 
the best in recent years. This phase of summer recreation 
is rapidly increasing in interest and personnel. Our Commi- 
ttee also assisted materially the Junior League and the Bal- 
lardvale Inter-Church League. 

Pomps Pond 
From the standpoint of Life Saving and Water Safety 
instruction, the past season was the best in the last decade. 
For the first time, specialized classes in Water Safety were 
inaugurated and the morning hours at the beach were res- 
tricted to only those taking courses. The good results we 
hoped for were accomplished as 420 registered for these 
classes. There were 286 Beginners ; 25 swimmers ; 75 Inter- 
mediates; 18 Junior Life Saving; 16 Senior Life Saving. 
Out of this group, 147 pupils passed the examinations in 
their respective fields and were awarded certificates. The 
beach opened at 10 A. M. and special bus service brought the 
children to class and returned them at noon. After 12 o'clock 
noon, the beach was opened to everybody for general water 
recreation. We plan to carry out the same program this year. 

Winter Activities 
Skating areas were maintained at Ballardvale and Cen- 
tral. A new hot-top area is anticipated at Central this year 

134 



which will bring better skating conditions in the future. The 
Sacred Heart School has offered the use of that rink to all 
Andover children. Our committee urges all to use this area 
rather than the hazardous Hussey's Pond. The National So- 
ciety of Out Door Winter Activities is very emphatic against 
using natural bodies of water for skating and frowns upon 
municipal supervision of such spots. Periodic dances at the 
Youth Center were also part of the winter program. 

Easter and Halloween 

The Annual Easter Egg Hunt was held in the Park on 
Easter Saturday with an attendance larger than in the past 
years. Halloween Parties were conducted at Central, Bal- 
lardvale, West Center and North District. Many veteran and 
civic organizations made donations to both these annual 
events and their generosity defrayed almost half the expen- 
ditures. 

This year the Recreation Committee is sponsoring again 
a special article in the Town Warrant for $600.00 to be spent 
in conjunction with the special appropriation of $2,300.00 
approved at the 1950 Town Meeting to improve and resur- 
face a portion of Central Playground for year round recrea- 
tional activities. 

We extend our sincere thanks to all organizations — ve- 
teran, civil and social — whose generosity and cooperation 
helped so much in making the past years so successful. 

Stafford A. Lindsay, Chairman 

Alan F. Dunlop 

Francis P. Markey, Secretary 

George Stanley, Jr. 

Alco E. Taylor 



135 



Report of The Special Committee 
On Water and Sewerage 



During 1953 no money was appropriated for major exten- 
sions to our water supply system, but the Board of Public 
Works made good use of the annual money set up for their 
use to complete many minor extensions and improvements, 
as well as a large number of house connections. This will 
still further increase the demand on Haggetts Pond which 
every year comes closer to the safe yield, and thus brings 
us nearer to the time when it will be necessary to take steps 
to increase that yield. 

At the last Town Meeting, $80,000 was voted to begin the 
installation of sewers in Ballardvale with the necessary 
treatment plant. Detailed engineering study, and the unex- 
pectedly high prices when bids were called for, showed that 
although the basic plan was sound it would be more econom- 
ical to prepare broader plans. The Town is therefore being 
asked to appropriate another $80,000, which will permit the 
construction of a suitable plant and the extension of sewer- 
age facilities to a much wider area than originally planned. 

Your committee believes that while the Town is consider- 
ing more new schools and an office building, it should also 
keep in mind the necessity for increasing the storage at 
Haggetts Pond, further extensions to our distributing sys- 
tem, increased reservoir capacity, and particularly the rein- 
forcement of our inadequate high pressure system, all of 
which have been previously recommended by your commit- 
tee. 

Joseph A. McCarthy, Chairman 
William R. Edwards 
Sidney P. White 



136 



Andover Town Infirmary 

January 28, 1954 
Gentlemen : 
To the Selectmen of Andover: 

I hereby submit my report of the Town Infirmary for the 
year 1953. During the past year we have had ten residents, 
two of whom were temporary. One was a veteran discharged 
from Togus, Me., who needed a few day's lodging. He found 
work at Phillips Academy after two days. The other was a 
Andover resident who needed care for two weeks while his 
daughter was in the hospital. We lost one of our oldest mem- 
bers in May after a short illness. On January first, we had 
seven, all in general good health. Two are over 80, four are 
between 70 and 80, and one is between 60 and 70. Our present 
cook has been with us a year. 

In the late spring some much needed papering and pain- 
ting was done to five rooms and the extensive hall in the 
matron's quarters. During the summer the outside of the 
infirmary was given two coats of paint by a local contractor 
and the appearance of the building is much improved. A new 
linoleum was laid, after the old had been removed and floor 
sanded, in one of the front rooms. More need the same. 

During the seven years I have been here, the house has 
settled considerable, making for warped doors, cracked 
ceilings, and loose windows, which in the winter let in more 
cold air than should be. A great deal of heat is lost. One new 
storm window was purchased, but that now is a total of 19 
which have extra protection and there are more than 60 
windows in the Infirmary. 

With so much salt and sand being used on the road in the 
winter, the lawns have become almost non-existant, the 
rains wash-the sand over to the lawns and leaving it there. 
The Y made in the back lawn four years ago has proved most 
unsuccessful and really something should be done to prevent 
the washing away of what little grass there is left. We seeded 
one large patch with some new loam but the first heavy rain 
took all the hard work away. 

137 



During the Christmas season, the residents were very 
kindly remembered by the Abbot Academy Christian Asso- 
ciation, the Andover Garden Club, the November Club, the 
Courteous Circle of the King's Daughters, the Sacred Heart 
Sodality, Cub Scouts, Brownies, Carolers from Christ 
Church, West Parish and St. Augustine's neighbors and a 
nurse at the Lawrence General Hospital. Hundreds of cards 
were received and each individual birthday is remembered. 
The Salavation Army brought Sunshine baskets at Easter 
and Christmas, and up until a few months ago they also 
brought movies once a month which are thoroughly enjoyed. 

They are also entertained three or four night's a week by 
watching television through the courtesy of the matron's 
family. 

Very truly yours, 

Jean E. Weeks, Matron 



138 



Fire Department 



February 2, 1954 
Board of Selectmen 
Town Hall 
Andover, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to submit my thirteenth annual report as 
Chief of the Andover Fire Department. 

During the year 1953 the department answered the fol- 
lowing alarms: 93 Bell; 206 Stills; 2 False; Total 301. 

Assessed value of buildings where fire occurred was 
$647,525.00. 

Loss in buildings where fires occured was $16,212.00. 

Ambulance calls for the year totaled 681. 

Fire prevention inspections in public and mercantile 
buildings 160. Oil heating systems and Liquefied Petroleum 
Gas systems inspected 395. Total inspections 555. 

The new Jeep Utility truck, authorized by the Town Meet- 
ing in March, was put in service April 16, 1953. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. Edward Buchan, Chief 
Andover Fire Dept. 



139 



Police Department 



To the Board of Selectmen, 
Andover, Massachusetts 

January 26, 1954 

Gentlemen : 

I submit a summary of the activities of the Police Depart- 
ment for the year ending December 31, 1953. 

Arrests and Charges 

Drunkenness 49 

Larceny 3 

Capias 1 

Assault and Battery 7 

Non Support 5 

Vagrancy 3 

Overtime Parking 9 

Operating Under Influence of Liquor 7 

Operating after Suspension of License 3 

Operating to Endanger 2 

Operating Motor Vehicle * No Sticker 2 

Operating without a License 12 

Operating Uninsured Motor Vehicle 1 

Surrender Warrant 1 

Idle and Disorderly 1 

Refusing to stop for Officer in Uniform 1 

Speeding 20 

Leaving scene of Accident 1 

Armed Robbery _ 1 

Peeping Tom t 1 

Breaking and Entering 3 

Unlawful use of Automobile 1 

A. W. 0. L. 2 

Delinquent Child 11 

Allowing improper person to operate a Motor Vehicle 1 

140 



Carrying a gun without a License 2 

Failure to give Hand Signal 2 

Preventing another Motor Vehicle to overtake 1 

Peddlar — No License 1 

Disposition of Cases 

Convicted in District Court 85 

On File 1 

Probation 17 

Released by Probation Officer 34 

Dismisssed 2 

Turned over to out of town Police 6 

Turned over to State Police 1 

Turned over to Army Authorities 2 

Sentenced to House of Correction 7 

Turned over to Youth Service Board 5 

Miscellaneous complaints received and investigated 573 

Summons served for out of town police 142 

Automobiles stolen in Andover 1 

Automobiles recovered in Andover 1 

Bicycles Stolen in Andover 16 

Bicycles Recovered in Andover 11 

Breaks in Camps and Dwellings 22 

Doors in Business District found open and secured 123 

Sheep killed by dogs 5 

Lost children returned to parents 9 
Runaway children returned to parents or institutions 19 

Dogs killed by automobiles 23 

Attempted suicides 2 
Street Lights reported out to Lawrence Electric Co. 428 

Dogs lost and returned to owner 37 

Number of persons bitten by dogs 31 
Board of Health and animal Inspector notified on dogbites31 

Cattle lost and returned to owner 4 

Dead bodies cared for by police 2 

Suicides reported and investigated by police 1 

Persons notified for out of town police 29 

Tramps put up for night in lock-up 7 

141 



Dwellings inspected while owners away 266 

Articles found and returned to owner 11 

Summons served on local complaints in Andover 21 

Missing persons reported, located, and returned 4 

Highway conditions reported to B. P. W. 22 

Water leaks in street reported by police to B. P. W. 3 

Tree Dept. notified of limbs and trees down in street 9 

Persons taken to Danvers State Hospital 2 

Persons taken to Hospital by Police in Cruisers 9 

Hens killed by dogs, investigated by Police 273 

Ducks killed by dogs, investigated by Police 3 

Turkeys killed by dogs, investigated by Police 3 

Bell Alarms of fire covered by Police 66 
Cards sent to Registry of Motor Vehicles for 

violation of motor law 176 

Arrests made for out of town police 6 

Breaks in Business District 8 

Hens reported stolen 50 

Respectfully submitted 

David L. Nicoll, Chief of Police 



142 



Board of Health Nurse and Agent 



December 31, 1953 

To the Board of Health and Townspeople of Andover 

I herewith submit a brief report as Board of Health Nurse 
and Agent for the Town of Andover for the year 1953 : 





1953 


1952 


1951 


Dog Bite 


46 


33 


45 


Tuberculosis 


1 


5 


3 


Scarlet Fever 


5 


2 


19 


Chicken Pox 


97 


14 


19 


Whooping Cough 


12 


19 


8 


Measles 


27 


148 


16 


Mumps 


22 


52 


72 


Syphilis 


1 


1 


3 


Gonorrhea 





1 





Infectious Jaundice 











Meningitis O.F. 


1 





4 


Anterior Poliomyelitis 











German Measles 


12 


12 


48 


Typhoid Fever 


1 


1 





Undulant Fever 





1 





Totals 


225 


289 


237 


Deaths from Contagious Diseases 




Influenzal Meningitis 








1 


Pulmonary Tuberculosis 


1 


2 


2 



Totals 12 3 

In 1954, Andover will continue to hold free clinics. Among 
these clinics will be Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoid innocu- 
lations for children entering school, the Baby Clinic, and the 
Anti-Rabic Clinic for Dogs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lotta M. Johnson, R.N., R.S. 

143 



Milk Inspector's Report 



To the Townspeople of Andovers 

I submit herewith a brief summary of the activities of my 
office for the year ending December 31. 1953. 

The following licenses have been granted and fees for 
these have been turned over to the Town Treasurer whose 
receipt I hold : 

Milk and Cream — 64 
Oleomargarine — 22 
Ice cream and Frozen Desserts — 3 
Pasteurizati on — 6 

The distribution of the milk and cream licenses is as 
follows : 

Distributors ( delivering from tracks ) — 23 
Retailers— 25 
Restaurants — 1 6 
Its also interesting to point out that within the confines 
of this town we have many items of both pride and interest 
in the fields of dairy products. Among these items we find — 

1. A plant that produces a non-fat dry milk solids pro- 
duct known as "Shawsheen Maid". This is manufac- 
tured at the plant of the New England Milk Produ- 
cer's Association in Shawsheen and is widely distri- 
buted. 

2. A plant specializing in the manufacture of Yogurt 
which product is shipped from Andover to many of 
the Atlantic coastal states. 

3. A farm specializing in the raising of prize livestock 
as well as in the production of dairy products. Live- 
stock from the Wild Rose Farm is highly regarded 
at the various fairs and shows where our Andover 
grown stock generally wins its share of blue ribbons. 



This town offers excellent opportunities for student group 
inspections of the dairy field. 

During the year 51 samples of milk and eight samples of 
cream were tested for butter fat, total solids and bacteria 
content. With two exceptions, all of the samples were within 
state standards. 

Periodic inspection trips were made to various farms and 
producing units. 

It is safe to state that the dairy product situation in this 
town is in good shape but the cooperation of all citizens is 
requested in the year ahead. Any infraction or suspected 
infraction of the milk laws in this community should be cal- 
led to our attention at once. 

Respectfully, 

Robert A. Walsh. Milk Inspector 



145 



Report of Building Inspector 



To the Board of Selectmen, 
Town of Andover, Mass. 

Gentlemen 

I herewith submit to your Board my report for the year 
ending December 31, 1953. 

There were One Hundred Ninety Nine (199) permits is- 
sued for construction of New Buildings and One Hundred 
Twenty Eight (128) permits for Additions and Alterations. 

The estimate value of new construction reached a total of 
Two Million Eighteen Thousand and Ninety Five Dollars 
($2018095.00) and One Hundred Ninety Seven Thousand 
Nine Hundred and Seventy Five Dollars ($197975.00) was 
the estimated cost of Additions and Alterations. 

The above making a final estimated total of Two Million 
Two Hundred Sixteen Thousand and Seventy Dollars 
($2216070.00). 

Twelve (12) additional apartments have been provided 
by alterations in existing buildings during the past year, 
thereby bringing the new dwelling count for 1953 to a total 
of One Hundred Sixty Four (164) units. 

The New Building Permits are classified below : 

Dwellings 152 

Single Garages 14 

Two Stall Garages 10 

Greenhouse 1 

Loading Platform 2 

Office Building 1 

Foundation only 1 

Tool Storage and Garage 1 

River Wall 1 

Poultry House 4 

Piggery 1 

Pump House 1 

146 



Swimming Pool 

Temporary Tool House 

Summer House 

Sand & Gravel Plant 

Tool Shed 

Garage Foundation 

Shop 

Radio Control Building 

Storage Building 

This Department has collected in fees and turned over to 
the Town Treasurer Two Thousand Six Hundred Eighty 
Nine Dollars ($2,689.00). 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ralph W. Coleman, Building Inspector 



Report of Wire Inspector 

January 2, 1954 

Board of Selectmen, 

Town Hall 

Andover, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen : 

I hereby submit my report for wiring inspections for the 
year 1953. 

Number of wiring inspection permits 518 

Number of fixture inspection permits 32 



Total 550 

Amount collected and turned over to treasurer, Town of 
Andover, $550.00. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William J. Young, Wire Inspector 

147 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 



December 31, 1953 

Board of Selectmen 
Andover, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen : 

I hereby submit my annual report for the year 1953 : 

Work performed from Jaunary 1, 1953 to December 31, 
1953 inclusive including Scales, Weights, Gasoline meters 
Vehicle tank systems, etc. : 

Adjusted Sealed Not Sealed Condemned 
Total 44 539 3 4 

Other Work Performed 

Complaints investigated 9 
Trial weighings and measurements of commodities 

put up for sale 594 

Other inspections : Pedlars, oil & coal certificates 104 

Total collection for the year 1953 were, $237.55. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph Serio, Sealer 



148 



Report of Tree Warden 



To the Citizens of Andover: — January 1, 1954 

The Tree Warden is an elected officer independent of any 
other town department. He derives all his powers from the 
Legislature and his duties are prescribed under Chapter 87 
of the General Laws of Massachusetts. The Supreme Court 
through Justice Braley has handed down a decision that, 
"public shade trees are planted and maintained not merely 
for the benefit of cities and towns but are for the benefit 
and enjoyment of all the inhabitants of the Commonwealth 
having occasion to use the public ways. There are over six- 
teen thousand shade trees on the public ways of the town 
and many miles of roadside growth under the care of the 
tree wardens department. 

The following number of trained men care for and main- 
tain these trees and roadside growth. 

Two men paid for out of the tree department appro- 
priation. 

Two men paid for out of the Dutch elm disease department 
appropriation. 

One man paid for out of the moth department appropria- 
tion. 

A total of five regular men in all three departments. 
Salary and wages amount to 80% of all appropriations. The 
20% remaining is paid out for insecticides, two sprayings 
of elms by a helicopter, maintenance of two IV2 ton trucks 
and a % ton pickup truck, a tractor, three spraying ma- 
chines, three chain saws and tools. Rent of shop and garage, 
telephone, heat etc. Men of the department repair tools and 
much of the equipment in stormy weather when there are no 
emergency calls. 

Repair or overhaul requiring special servicing is per- 
formed mostly in local garages. This is the same policy as 
used by all other town departments. 

149 






Tree department men are often called out after hours in 
rain and snow storms to clear the roads of fallen trees and 
broken branches. 

In times of emergencies like the flood of 1936 and the 
hurricanes of 1938 and 1944 every town department has all 
its men and equipment alerted to take part in all work, co- 
ordinated by the selectmen. 

Andover is fortunate in the ability of its officials and men 
of all departments. Their knowledge and interest in their 
work sets a high standard for other municipalities to equal. 
There may be a few drones at times but they do not remain 
long. The percentage of good men in town employ is much 
greater than in many other towns and cities as well as in 
industry. 

Men in the tree department are trained in all branches of 
tree maintenance, and receive higher pay for this specilized 
work. 

The men in the tree department are of high intelligence, 
only their love of trees and interest in their work holds them 
from better paid positions in commercial tree companies or 
in industry. 

The foreman of these departments has served the town 
with distinction for nearly twenty five years. He has given 
many unpaid hours to the town, trained many of the men in 
tree work over the years and saved the town hundreds of 
dollars by his skill in repairing ropes, tools and equipment. 
The tree and moth departments in Andover are considered 
by state officials as one of the best of its size in the Common- 
wealth with higher quality work than many larger town and 
city departments. 

Over the past seventeen years we have built a monument 
of service to the town and state, by the maintenance of large 
trees-a legecy from the past - and in the planting of young 
shade trees, a monument that will last as long as the trees 
themselves, a heritage to future generations. 

Your Tree Warden has acquired much knowledge of trees, 
through his association with tree officers from other towns 
and cities, members of commercial tree companies and with 

150 



instructors in shade tree practices; many of whom have 
beaten a path to his door in the past seventeen years. 

Your Tree Warden has served the town with ability, with 
devotion to the shade trees of the town, and with a friendly 
service to all citizens of Andover. 

He offers his services to the town as your Tree Warden as 
long as you care to elect him. He has two more years to serve 
of his present term. A consolidation of the tree department 
into the board of public works would automatically end his 
services to the town, and would end the services of his fore- 
man by retirement and his trained men by their leaving to 
join commercial tree companies. 

Your shade trees - Andovers greatest asset - would suffer 
from neglect as in the few other towns where the tree de- 
partment has been placed under public works department. 
Skilled tree workers soon leave departments under control 
of men with no knowledge of tree care. 

How many more years the present Tree Warden serves 
you are in the hands of the voters of Andover if a bill filed in 
the Legislature this year, by Representative Collins is passed 
allowing this consolidation. 



During 1953 two disastrous storms occured which have 
taken their toll of trees, causing several weeks of repair 
work after each storm, to the exclusion of all other work. 

During the past fourteen years with hot dry summers our 
trees (190 surrounded by hard street pavements) have ac- 
cumulated an excessive amount of dead wood. The two men 
paid from the tree department have not been able to main- 
tain our trees in good condition. Trees in poor condition 
attract borers and other insects that take a heavy toll and 
cause excessive repair work. 

I am requesting the employment of another trained tree 
climber in the tree department at an increase in the appro- 
priation of $3200.00. 

This tree climber would replace one eliminated two years 
ago when the tree department appropriation was reduced by 
three thousand dollars. This reduction has proved unwise 
and costly to the town. 

151 



A special article in the warrant will request $312.00 for a 
20 inch electric chain saw to be operated from our electric 
generator. 

Our present 14 inch electric chain saw purchased two 
years ago and used up in trees has proven a fine invesment 
for the town. Our generator is capable of operating both 
saws at the same time. 

Another special article in the town warrant will request 
$2200.00 for a tractor with safety mower attachments for 
roadside mowing in the summer and the tractor to be used 
at other times in heavy tree removal work especially in the 
removal of large elm trees which have to be removed because 
of infection with the Dutch elm disease. 

The use of the board of public works sidewalk tractor 
proved to be excessively costly to the town in roadside mo- 
wing operations. Not suited for roadside mowing it practi- 
cally ruined a $390.00 mowing machine. In polite language 
it was a costly engineering blunder. 



New Trees 



Because of many storms last spring which delayed plan- 
ting only 32 young trees were planted. In late October after 
heavy rains soaked the ground 35 more young trees were 
planted. 

Two years ago the Andover Village Improvement Society 
appropriated $150.00 for the Tree Warden to purchase new 
trees for the town. Half of the young trees were planted at 
that time while the remainder were held over in a nursery 
and planted this fall. Many of these trees were new varieties 
not often planted in Andover. 

The varieties were Thornless Honey Locust, Moraine 
Locust, Globe Locust, Liquidambar, Gingko, Crimson King 
Maple, Chinese Flowering Dogwood, Magnolia and Gray 
Beech. 

Your Tree Warden tries to supply all young trees reques- 
ted by the home owner, generally two trees in front of each 
home, either in the tree belt on the public ways or inside 

152 



the sidewalk by written permission of the home owner. Such 
trees have a better place in which to grow, away from 
overhead electric wires and the danger of being surrounded 
by hard pavement. 

The interest, appreciation and co-operation in the planting 
and care of these new trees by the home owners is an inspira- 
tion to the Tree Warden and to the men of the tree depart- 
ment. 

Respectfully submitted 

George R. Abbott, Tree warden 



53 



Report of Moth Superintendent 



To the Board of Selectmen & 

The Citizens of Andover:- January 1, 1954 

The Moth Superintendents duties are statutory, that is 
they are prescribed by law passed by the Legislature under 
Chapter 132 of the General Laws of Massachusetts as amen- 
ded by Chapter 660 of 1948 and Chapter 761 of 1949. 

The Moth Superintendent carries out his duties under the 
general direction of the State Moth Superintendent through 
a State Division Moth Superintendent who advises on the 
work to be done, visits infested areas and receives reports 
from the local Moth Superintendent as to sums paid out for 
salary, labor, insecticides, equipment, maintenance etc. 

The state department supplies metal tags, cloth strips and 
duplicate book forms, all numbered to identify elm trees 
from which samples are taken and sent to the laboratory at 
Amherst. 

The main work of the men in the moth department is the 
control of insects designated by the Legislature to be public 
nuisances under Chapter 660 of the General Laws and con- 
trol of the Dutch elm disease as prescribed under Chapter 
761 of the General Laws. 



Scouting for egg clusters of the gypsy moth was carried 
out in all parts of the town last winter at the request of the 
state moth department. Egg clusters were found in small 
numbers in several woodland areas that might in time build 
up into a heavy infestation. They were also found in small 
numbers near the roadsides, scattered in various parts of 
the town. These eggs were destroyed by an application of 
creosote and the insects by our spray program in the spring. 

We are very much concerned with heavy infestations of 
the woodlands in towns to the east of Andover. It is hoped 
that these towns with the assistance of the state department 
will destroy this infestation by spraying the infested wood- 

154 



lands by airplane before the gypsy moth caterpillars can 
spread to new areas. 

Dutch Elm Disease 

We have been able to hold the Dutch elm disease to about 
the same number of diseased trees during the past three 
years. 95 - 96 - 98 elms were destroyed in '51 -'52 -'53. State 
authorities point this out as a good record achieved by spray- 
ing from the ground with an areo-mist machine and a 
hydraulic sprayer; while two seperate applications from 
overhead by a helicopter were applied to about 600 elms in 
residential areas. The removal and burning of diseased trees 
is also a main control measure. Andover, North Andover and 
Tewksbury are fighting to hold this disease in check while 
cities and towns to the north who have neglected to check 
this tree disease are beginning to realize the disaster that 
threatens the lives and property of their citizens. 

One city has already found it necessary to ask the Legis- 
lature for permission to borrow $100,000.00 outside the debt 
limit. This sum to be used to remove dead and dieing trees 
which are dangerous to people traveling on the highway. 
And because the trees have become weak and brittle from 
the action of the disease they are a serious threat to the tree 
worker who attempts to remove them. 

The electric company in the past three years has given us 
valuable assistance by removing dangerous trees along their 
distributing electric lines, in the removal of branches of 
diseased trees from among their high voltage wires and in 
loaning the department safety equipment when our men are 
working near dangerous electric wires. 

Your Superintendent and Tree Warden by his interest in 
Andover trees has shown the electric company the advantage 
to their plant in doing this work because it reduces emer- 
gency work during storms, saves electric equipment from 
burning out, there are fewer interuptions in service to their 
customers and it inhances good public relations. 

The moth department men are proud of their record in 
removing diseased elm trees at a cost as low as any depart- 
ment in the Commonwealth. 

1.35 



Andover by its continuous fight to hold the Dutch elm 
disease in check by prompt removal of diseased trees is 
benefitting by the movement of new home owners to a safer, 
and more beautiful community. This is because young public 
trees are planted each year to restore the beauty which is 
ANDOVER. 

Respectfully submitted 

George R. Abbott, Moth Superintendent 



156 



Report of Civil Defense Agency 



To the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Andover 
Gentlemen: 

I hereby submit the annual report of the Civil Defense 
Agency in the Town of Andover. 

The need for a strong Civil Defense Agency was brought 
out this past year when the tornado struck the Worcester 
area. The saving of countless lives and property damage was 
credited to the speed in which the Worcester Civil Defense 
Agency and surrounding city and town organizations rushed 
in to assist the stricken area. Andover was called upon to 
send volunteers and equipment to Worcester, and on the 
night of the disaster, men, trucks, power saws, and blankets 
were sent. Thus it was brought out that a Civil Defense or- 
ganization can be a peace-time agency as well as a war-time 
one. 

During the past year one air raid test was conducted in 
this area. This test was ordered primarily to test the warn- 
ing devices of the cities and towns. Andover is about one-half 
covered as far as warning devices are concerned. The south 
section of the town beyond Phillips Academy has little or no 
coverage, as is true of the West Andover section. At least 
two air raid sirens comparable to the type used in the last 
war are necessary to give the town ample coverage. 

First Aid equipment supplied by the state for use in emer- 
gency is now stored in the local Civil Defense Office. This 
includes fifty four stretchers, and enough hospital and medi- 
cal supplies to equip a first aid station. 

The Civilian War Aid Division of the local agency is still 
more or less concentrated at Phillips Academy, where much 
planning and work are put in each year to maintain a real 
standby readiness. 

157 



The Auxiliary Police Department is the most active de- 
partment of the Civil Defense Agency. The officers contri- 
bute a great deal of time to the various town functions re- 
quiring police details. They participated in the air raid drill, 
the drive for funds for the Worcester area, the Mother's 
Polio Drive, as well as working at parades, football games, 
and other town functions. In addition to this, they volunteer 
their services for regular police work as part of their train- 
ing. Two of the Auxiliary Officers were present and assisted 
the regular patrolman in the capture of two men who had 
broken into a home in Ballardvale. This year four Auxiliary 
Pistol teams participated in the New England Police Revol- 
ver League matches, and again medals were won by the local 
teams — fourteen medals in all. The town has supplied some 
equipment for these Auxiliary officers, but I believe that 
some uniform equipment should also be furnished. This 
Auxiliary Department is an asset to the town and to the po- 
lice department, and I hope that the town will show some 
appreciation for the time that these men volunteer by sup- 
plying uniforms for them. 

Respectfully submitted, 
David L. Nicoll, Director, Civil Defense 



158 



Town of Andover — Jury List 

JUNE, 1953 



Abbot, David M. 
Abbott, Irene 0. 
Abbott, Richard W. 
Allen, Charles F. 
Allicon, Gertrude A. 
Allis, Frederick S. Jr. 
Anderson, John A. 
Andrew, T. Edwin Jr. 
Ashburn, James R. 
Auchterlonie, John C. 
Auty, Herbert W. 
Bailey, Ralph A. 
Barer oft, Harold 
Barnard, Elizabeth F.D. 
Barss, Helen W. 
Batcheller, Kirk R. 
Bendroth, Norma H. 
Bernardin, Mary V. 
Bird, William F. 
Blake, Winston A. 
Bonner, Ruth W. 
Boutwell, Everett S. 
Brierly, James 
Brown, Christine J. 
Brown, Mildred H. 
Buchan, Raymond L. 
Bullock, Emily 
Burke, Garrett J. 
Burke, Sarah, J. 
Buthmann, Fred A. 
Butler, Anna 0. 
Campbell, George W. 
Carey, Edna B. 
Carmichael, Katherine S. 
Carter, Phoebe B. 



Time Study 89 Abbot St. 

Housewife 83 Bartlet St. 

Builder 25 Upland Rd. 
Foreman 361 Andover St., B.V. 

Nurse 115 Holt Rd. 

Instructor off 20 Salem St. 

Clerk Ballardvale Rd. 
Real Est. & Ins. 14 Riverina Rd. 

Sales Mgr. 135 Haverhill St. 

Mechanic 65 Red Spring Rd. 

Sales Mgr. 6 Chestnut St. 

Salesman Porter Rd. 

YMCA Sec. 34% Summer St. 

Housewife 14 Cabot Rcl. 

Housewife Hidden Field 

Salesman 161 Lowell St. 

Housewife 17 High St. 

Housewife 11 Abbot St. 

Salesman 12 Canterbury St. 

Food Broker 5 Stratford Rd. 
Tel. Operator 69 Highland Rd. 

Farmer High Plain Rd. 
Operative 7 Tewksbury St. B.V. 

Housewife 4 Stratford Rd. 

Housewife 422 Andover St. 

Retired 12 Lincoln St. 

Secretary West Knoll Rd. 

Funeral Dir. 390 No. Main St. 

At Home 390 No. Hain St. 

Statistician Dascomb Rd. 

Housewife 72 Poor St. 

Ins. Agent So. Main St. 

Housewife 33 Balmoral St. 

Housewife 84 Poor St. 

Housewife Lowell St. 



159 



Caswell, Helen E. 
Chadwick, Etta 
Cheever, W. Abbott 
Cheney, Paul M. 
Christison, Leslie 
Churchchill, Elmer T. 
Clarke, Augusta F. 
Clark, Granville A. 
Clark, Wilbur T. 
Colby, Herrick E. 
Collins, Andrew 
Collins, Florence I. 
Collins, William F. 
Cookson, Francis R. 
Creamer, J. Robert 
Cronin, Timothy F. 
Cutler, Granville K. 
Dalrymple, Horace A. 
Dalton, Charles F. 
Darby, James J. 
Denoncourt, Roland 
Desrocher, Edward C. 
Disbrow, Walter A. 
Doherty, William A. 
Donaldson, Donald 
Douglas, Richard S. 
Dowd, Louise M. 
Doyle, Irene 
Draper, Ralph L. 
Driscoll, John J. 
Drolet, Henry E. 
Duffy, Elizabeth I. 
Dufton, Phyllis L. C. 
Dunbar, Mary C. 
Dunnells, Mabel R. 
Eastman, Floyd W. 
Easton, Craig B. 
Eaton, Lucy A. 
Emery, J. Donovan 



Housewife 

Housewife 

Artist 

Ins. Adjuster 

Chemist 

Insurance 

Housewife 

Elec. Dealer 

Guard 

Mach. Op. 

Manager 

Housewife 

Retired 

Photographer 

Reporter 

Contractor 

Dyer 

Accountant 

Druggist 

Salesman 

Chauffeur 

Second Hand 

Operative 

Insurance 

Manufacturer 

Asst. Treas. 

Statistician 

Housewife 

Mech. Eng. 

Store Keeper 

Real Estate 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

At Home 

Clerk 

Retired 

Housewife 

Ins. Mgr. 



5 Dumbarton St. 

50A Whittier St. 

219 Salem St. 

83 Maple Ave. 

100 Burnham Rd. 

98 Chestnut St. 

30 Chestnut St. 

100 Elm St. 

6 Liberty St. 

117 Shawsheen Rd. 

18 Wolcott Ave. 

38 Maple Ave. 

18 Washington Ave. 

123 Main St.. 

90 Haverhill St. 

79 Cheever Circle 

99 Shawsheen Rd. 

10 Foster Circle 

70 Chestnut St. 

125 Main St. 

93 Abbot St. 

21 Florence St. 

Chandler Rd. 

21 Harding St. 

260 No. Main St. 

18 Morton St. 

40 Chestnut St. 

Chandler Rd. 

27 Bartlet St. 

36 Summer St. 

Lowell St. 

4 Arundel St. 

33 Canterbury St. 

53 Phillips St. 

103 Abbot St. 

83 Chestnut St. 

36 Walnut Ave. 

49 Abbot St. 

117 Lowell St. 



160 



Erhardt, Frederick A. 
Erving, John M. Jr. 
Ferrier, Robert L. 
Fleming, Edward R. Jr. 
Flint, Edwin M. 
Forbes, David A. 
Foster, Robert M. 
Francis, Charles H. 
Friel, John A. 
Gabeler, Ruth H. 
Gagne, Dorothy F. 
Gens, Harold F. 
Gilman, William M. 
Glines, Arthur B. 
Gordon, Ella M. 
Gordon, Walter N. 
Gray, William I. 
Greenhow, John M. 
Guay, Raymond R. 
Haartz, Bessie C. 
Hamilton, Frederick L. 
Hannan, Laurence J. 
Hart, William J. 
Haselton, Mabel M. 
Hall, Charles A. Jr. 
Hill, Marion E. 
Holt, Percy R. 
Howard, Joseph A. 
Howe, Carolyn D. 
Howe, Guy B. Jr. 
Howe, Lillian E. 
Johnson, Leonard P. 
Jones, Arthur W. 
Jones, Lucius P. 
Jowett, Robertina 
Judge, Homer G. 
Judge, Irene E. 
Juhlmann, Laura 
Kiernan, Francis H. 



Salesman 
Asst. Mgr. 
Elec. Helper 
Painter 
Farmer 
Janitor 
Asst. Mgr. 



66 Park St. 

59 Salem St. 

82 Essex St. 

37 Maple Ave. 

Pleasant St. 

1 Sweeney Ct. 

4 Dumbarton St. 



Superintendent 14 Beech Circle 
Ins. Agent 89 Chestnut St. 

Housewife 25 Central St. 

H'wife & Treas. 5 Kensington St. 
Real Estate 187 Chestnut St. 
Laborer Lowell St. 

Electrician So Main St. 

Textile Worker Lowell St. 

Maintenance Dept. 78 Main St. 
Real Estate 6 Corbett St. 

Retired 124 Main St. 

Accountant 23 Summer St. 

Bookkeeper 60 High Plain Rd. 
Last Designer 62 Maple St. 

Foreman 63 High St. 

Bus Operator 5 Henderson Ave. 
Housewife 11 Cheever Circle 
Electrician 13 Chestnut St. 

Purchasing Agt. 93 Central St. 
Clerk 6 Morton St. 

Construction 130 Hidden Rd. 
Saleswoman 234 Highland Ave. 
Service Mgr. 6 Henderson Ave. 
Manager 27 Sutherland St. 

Architect 22 York St. 

Clerk 98 Main St. 

Baseball Scout 10 Stratford Rd. 
Clerk 6 Binney St. 

Carpenter 219 Highland Rd. 
Housewife 219 Highland Rd. 
Retired 70 Center St. 

Constr. Eng. West Knoll Rd. 



161 



Killorin, Karl 
Knipe, Wilson Jr. 
Krinsky, Morris 
Lamb, Ernest R. 
Lawrence, Camille 
Lawson, Ronald R. 
Leahy, William F. 
Lindsay, Edith F. 
Livingston, Delia M. 
Livingston, Harold S. 
Lloyd, Walter 
Lord, Wilfred 
Lundergan, Charles J. 
MacDonald, David 
Marcille, Arthur J. 
Markey, Gertrude M. 
Mattheson, Wendell A. 
McCarthy, Irene H. 
McDonald, William L. 
McFarlin, Margaret H. 
McGhie, Gavin H. 
McLay, Hugh Jr. 
Mill, Victor J. Jr. 
Miller, Frances S. 
Milliken, Ralph N. 
Milne, David 
Minard, Dorothy L. 
Monro, Frances 
Mooar, Mary R. 
Morehouse, W. Ray 
Mosher, James R. 
Mowat, Raymond G. 
Murray, John M. 
Nason, Harry C. 
Nelligan, Francis A. 
Nowell, Frederick N. 
Noyes, May L. 
O'Donnell, Eunice M. 
Otis, Herbert H. 



Real Estate 

Clerk 

Junk Dealer 

Chauffeur 

Cashier 

Salesman 

Operative 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Florist 

Salesman 

Retired 

Painter 

Operative 



77 Main St. 

1 Stratford Rd. 

41 Elm St. 

54 Lowell St. 

4 Lewis St. 

County Rd. 

65 Red Spring Rd. 

Lincoln Circle 

Brown St. 

107 Abbott St. 

7 Argyle St. 

23 Wolcott Ave. 

68 Essex St. 

1 Upland Rd. 



Plant Clerk 249 Andover St. B.V. 
Housewife 48 Chestnut St. 

Bank Auditor 12 Clark Rd., B.V. 
Secretary 74 Morton St. 

Retired Railroad St. 

Housewife 2 Punchard Ave. 
Railroad 72 Clark Rd. B.V. 

R. R. E'ploy. 1 Marland Rd. B.V. 
Manufacturer 4 Cedar Rd. 

Housewife 17 Lowell St. 

Manufacturer 37 Canterbury St. 
Laborer 20 Cuba St. 

Housewife 17 Salem St. 

Housewife 105 Chestnut St. 

Housewife Lowell St. 

Service Mgr. 124 Chestnut St. 
Clerk 78 Haverhill St. 

Real Estate 104 Pine St. 

Gas Station Prop. 27 Summer St. 
Carpenter 369 Andover St. 

Oil Business 49 Carmel Rd. 

Property Mgr. 63 Chestnut St. 
General Work 19 Love joy Rd. 
Teacher 11 Tewksbury St. 

Insurance 70 Summer St. 



162 



Patterson, Helen 
Perkins, Henry F. 
Pike, Walter N. 
Piper, Gladys M. 
Poland, William 
Polgreen, John A. 
Quigley, Evelyn M. 
Rafton, Helen G. 
Read, Arthur E. Jr. 
Reed, Viola C. 
Regan, Charles D. 
Remmes, Joseph T. 
Rice, Mary A. 
Robb, James G. 
Robbins, May V. 
Robbins, Ralph I. 
Roberts, George P. 
Rockwell, Henry D. Jr. 
Rooks, Barbara L. 
Roundy, Virginia A. 
Schirner, Dorothy 
Schirner, Emil G. Jr. 
Sherman, Arthur F. 
Sherry, Frank R. 
Sherrock, Bessie R. 
Shorten, Mildred R. 
Sjostrom, Ivar L. Jr. 
Smith, Frederick H. 
Smith, Geraldine P. 
Souter, John B. Jr. 
Sparks, Jane T. 
Spinney, Chares H. 
Stedman, Herbert D. 
Steinert, Arthur E. 
Stevens, Carl H. 
Stevenson, Frank B. 
Stopford, William W. 
Sullivan, Augustine P. 
Sweeney, Gerald S. 



Housewife 17 High Plain Rd. 
Engineer 46 Walnut Ave. 

Core Maker 18 Walnut Ave. 
Burler 29 Canterbury St. 

Clerk 37 High St. 

Insurance 36 Whittier St. 

Housewife So Main St. 

Chemist & Housewife Alden Rd. 
Sales P'tion 107 High Plain Rd. 
Secretary Dascomb Rd. 

Gas Sta. Mgr. 79 Summer St. 
Electrician Woodland Rd. 

Housewife 8 Morton St. 

Rubber Worker 98 So. Main St. 
Housewife 55 Red Spring Rd. 
Mech. Engr. 55 Red Spring Rd. 
Engineer Abbot St. 

Carder 47 Cuba St. 

Gift Shop Mgr. 8 Lincoln St. 
Housewife 28 Wolcott Ave. 

Housewife 3 Lincoln Circle 
IBM Operator 75 Pine St. 

Ind. Enginer 17 Lincoln Circle 
Pattern Maker 247 Andover St. 
Housewife 8 Maple Ave. 

Clerk 53 Abbot St. 

Organist 84 Main St. 

Real Estate 86 Main St. 

Housewife 20 Johnson Rd. 

J'ry Repair 32 Washington Ave. 
Secretary Rocky Hill Rd. 

Machinist 97 Chestnut St. 

Florist 78 Lowell St. 

Contractor 1 Union St. 

Contractor Virginia Rd. 

Engineer 23 Chandler Rd. 

Operative 50 Chestnut St. 

Accountant 34 Essex St. 

Salesman 7 Argyle St. 



163 



Sweeney, Mildred L. 
Symonds, Eva M. 
Taft, Rebekah L. 
Tavern, Dorothy S. 
Taylor, Josephine B. 
Teichert, Elsie M. 
Thompson, Lester M. 
Thompson, Margaret H. 
Thomson, David M. 
Trow, Henry, J. 
Wallace, Thomas R. 
Ward, Roswell E. 
Weimar, Helen N. 
Wetterberg, Carl A. 
Wetterberg, Glennie P. 
Wilkinson, Marcia A. 
Wilkinson, Raymond, E, 
Williams, Isabelle M. 
Zecchini, John A. 



Housewife 64 Central St. 

Housewife 4 Beech Circle 

Student 232 Salem St. 

At Home 6 Locke St. 

Housewife 38 Canterbury St. 
Housewife West Knoll Rd. 

Sales Manager Chandler Circle 
Housewife Porter Rd. 

Laborer Clinton Court, B. V. 
Chauffeur 56 River St. 

Asst. Purch. Agent 54 High St. 
Salesman 2 Brechin Terr. 

Housewife 21 High Plain Rd. 
53 Summer St. 






Janitor 

Clerk 

Housewife 

Wool Dealer 

Housewife 

Salesman 



53 Summer St. 

46 York St. 

6 Cabot Rd. 

Chandler Circle 

County Rd. 



164 



Trustees and Staff of Memorial 
Hall Library 



CAROLINE P. LEAVITT LEO F. DALEY 
EDWARD I. ERICKSON ARTHUR W. REYNOLDS 
JOSEPH SERIO WILLIAM N. PERRY 

ALAN R. BLACKMER 

Chairman 
ARTHUR W. REYNOLDS 

Secretary 
WILLIAM N. PERRY 

Treasurer 
LEO F. DALEY 

Librarian 
MIRIAM PUTNAM 

MARGARET D. MANNING, Assistant Librarian, in 
charge Readers' Services 

MARGARET LANE, Children's Librarian 

SHEILA M. C. TAYLOR, Catalog and Reference Librarian 

ELEANORE G. BLISS, Circulation Assistant* 

GERTRUDE B. HART, Secretarial Assistant 

M. ETHEL, ZINK, Branch Librarian, Ballardvale 

Building Custodian 
MARK SURETTE 

* Part-time 

165 



THE LIBRARY REACHES PEOPLE 

Often it seems difficult to think of fresh ways in which to 
describe the library and its services, yet it should not be so 
since no two years are ever just alike. Each year new people, 
young and old, discover the library for the first time. Each 
year new books are published, a few to find enduring places 
on the library's shelves, but more destined to be soon forgot- 
ten. Each year, too, old books take on new life and signifi- 
cance as they are freshly interpreted by the new readers 
which they attract. Well-seasoned library users, with recent- 
ly discocered interests, find hitherto untapped resources in 
their familiar library. 

The Library Reaches People 

How many people does the library reach directly or indi- 
rectly in the course of a year? if we could find the answer 
to this question, we should be in possession of quite start- 
ling statistics. Like a stone thrown into a pool of clear 
water, setting in motion many ripples, the library reaches 
more people than those who come through its doors. 

For a moment let us look, at this wider library public and 
what it means to the total library picture. All those who 
come within its orbit have an impact upon it and should 
any part of them be lost then some of the effectiveness of the 
library would be lost with them. 

Members of the community at large comprise a very 
important part of this wider public for by accepting the 
library's budget at town meeting, they enable it to carry 
on its many sided program and to be a dynamic rather 
than a static community force. If we look rather wistfully 
at the people at town meeting whom we do not see within the 
library's walls, there is some consolation in the thought that 
there is scarecely an Andover family which does not feel 
the influence of the library at some point. 

However, support, no matter how good, will be of little 
use if the library has no sense of direction. The direction 
is provided by the members of the Library Board who are 
the people who establish policy and thus set the library on 

166 



its course. Yet this would be merely intellectual exercise 
were it not for the Library Staff whose important job it is 
to translate this policy into effective action. 

We do not underestimate, either, the importance to the 
success of any library program of a solid core of devoted 
library users who promote the library in the community 
far more effectively than the best considered kind of public 
relations program. Valuable interpreters of the library, too, 
are the men and women who provide the leadership for music 
evenings, discussion groups and similar activities and so 
make possible the library's group program. 

The Library Reaches Beyond its Walls 

Less close the library but sharers in it nonetheless 
are the men and women who belong to organizations for 
which the library has planned an evening of films, who have 
borrowed its projection equipment, used its meeting rooms, 
or gotten a glimpse of its larger resources through a book 
talk, a specially prepared book list or book exhibit. 

Although the heart of the library's service is with indivi- 
duals, the library's influence extends often beyond the indi- 
vidual seeker. The book read for sheer enrichment may af- 
fect, not only the reader, but the people with whom he comes 
in contact. In like manner, library resources which help an 
individual to prepare a paper for a church or club group, 
select games for a cub scout meeting, or a prose and poetry 
selection for a prize speaking contest, prepare a book review 
for a business group, entertain a group of friends with an 
evening of recordings, or select decorative designs for a 
tray painting course reach a wide circle of people for whom, 
quite consciously the individual is preparing. On the other 
hand, some one whose use of the library enables him to au- 
thenticate details for a book he is illustrating, gain informa- 
tion for an editorial, or work on the solution of a problem 
does not work in a vacuum either although he can never 
surely know the people he may reach and influence. It is 
apparent that no library statistics can measure the total 
number of people indirectly reached by its services. 

167 



The Library Reaches the Wider Community 

No library works in a vacuum either, nor can it be entire- 
ly self contained in its own community. Ideas which are its 
life blood, once released, link it to the larger community 
and the people in it. Books which increase our understanding 
of some of the problems facing the world's people may suffice 
to illustrate what we have in mind. 

In a sense visitors to the Memorial Hall Library both 
from this country and abroad are part of this wider com- 
munity. They are important, if only for the fresh viewpoint 
which they bring. Perhaps it is an old friend returning to a 
familiar scene, a family anxious to see its place of origin, 
an American librarian who wants to see how another small 
library does things. A more striking example was provided 
by the visit of a German librarian, in this country under a 
State Department program, who spent a day in our library 
and community with the result that for those who met her. 
Gottingen, hereafter, will have a rather personal point of 
reference. More lasting, because of longer duration, has been 
the association with an English librarian from East York- 
shire, a fellow staff member until next June, with whom 
we have profitably exchanged professional experiences and 
from whom both staff and public alike have gained a fresh 
appreciation of a country bound to ours by many ties. 

Mention should be made, too, of the numerous individuals, 
organizations and town departments whose special-know- 
how or other unsual contribution, has been so helpful to the 
library in its work. This know-how may take the form of 
sharing a hobby, arranging an interesting exhibit, like